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Be grateful for the blessings of the U.S.

first_imgWe raised five children, for 30 consecutive years, in the Schenectady school district. I have always been a strong advocate of the district and the educational opportunities that are available — if you choose to take advantage of them.The picture of the football teams in the Sept. 30 Gazette was great. It seems the coaches and players handled the situation nicely. They are to be commended for their maturity and resolve.That picture and the many flags I see flying (seems like there’s a lot these days) remind me that we live in a God-blessed country. We are not perfect, we are very diverse and we will never all agree on the same things.However, when was the last time you read or heard about people literally or figuratively dying to get into any other country in the world? This should speak to us that despite our differences, we should be thankful for the bounty and blessings of this country. We should continue to lend a helping hand here and around the world.Susan HoverSchenectadyMore from The Daily Gazette:Schenectady department heads: Budget cutbacks would further stress already-stretched departmentsEDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationSchenectady NAACP calls for school layoff freeze, reinstatement of positionsSchenectady police reform sessions pivot to onlineSchenectady High School senior class leaders look to salvage sense of normalcy Categories: Letters to the Editor, Opinionlast_img read more

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Newest Gazette reporter joins tradition of adventurers

first_imgCategories: Editorial, OpinionJournalists are an adventuresome bunch by nature.During my 30 years in newspapers, I’ve had the privilege to work with countless colleagues who are passionate about exploration, reporters and editors eager to hike the next peak, paddle a new river.One of my former co-workers left his job for a year to trek in Nepal and elsewhere in South Asia.Another one left her reporting career altogether to hike the Appalachian Trail (and she made it!).On a more modest scale, one current Gazette co-worker recently bicycled the length of the Erie Canal bike route for her summer vacation.  Last fall, a different co-worker loaded up his little Subaru for a weeklong solo road trip to the remote and chilly reaches of northern Canada.To sleep at night, he stretched out his 6-foot, 2-inch frame in the back of his hatchback.Then there are the weekend warriors.Nary a week goes by that some Gazette newsie isn’t snowshoeing in the Adirondacks, backcountry skiing in Vermont or discovering on foot some up-and-coming city in the Northeast.Adventure is a big part of life for many Gazette staffers.And so it comes as a pleasant bonus that the newest member of the Gazette team is an explorer himself.PHOTOS PROVIDEDPete DeMolaPete DeMola started last week as our new reporter covering government and other happenings in Schenectady. More from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsEDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesEDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationFoss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?EDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the census Pete, 36, is a veteran of numerous adventures big and small. At last count, he’d visited 15 countries outside the United States.Pete’s grandest adventure to date was his eight-year stint in China, a trip he embarked on shortly after graduation from Syracuse University in 2005.There, he worked for a period of time as a freelance journalist before landing a business-reporting gig with a state-run media outlet, a music-reporting position with a social media startup and a job with a Beijing-based record label.Life in the land of 1.4 billion people was vastly different from Pete’s childhood in upstate New York in his hometown of Marcellus, population 6,210.The experience was profound.“Reporting from China during such a transitional time in the country’s history was eye-opening and formative,” DeMola says now.When Pete returned to the States in 2013, it didn’t take him long to set out on his next adventure.center_img He’s already crisscrossing the city in search of stories, a better sense of life in the Electric City and, perhaps most importantly, good places to eat. Cooking, it turns out, is one of his top two hobbies along with traveling.So far, thanks to a crowd-sourcing effort on social media, Pete has put together a growing list of eating establishments to try.The list includes More Perreca’s, Druther’s and Mike’s Hot Dogs —and he’s just getting started.So if you see Pete out and about in the coming weeks, perhaps enjoying an Italian pastry at Civitello’s or a pickle at The Dilly Bean, say hello.If you’re lucky, he might have a minute to share a story about one of his adventures.Miles Reed is the editor of The Daily Gazette. He relocated to New York’s North Country for a job reporting for a small newspaper in Essex County, the Sun Community News. There, he quickly dove into reporting on some of the most critical issues facing the region, including economic-development challenges and land-use issues.The beat also allowed Pete to flex his investigative muscles, eventually producing a series of enterprising reports about the state’s universal broadband initiative and criminal schemes involving rural Medicaid transportation.Pete went on to get promoted to managing editor of The Sun, but not before receiving accolades for his reporting.He was named the New York State Press Association’s Reporter of the Year in 2016.And last year, he was named runner-up for NYPA’s Thomas G. Butson Award for In-Depth Reporting for a series of articles exploring the challenges facing the home health care industry in the Adirondacks.For his latest adventure, Pete moved to Schenectady earlier this month to be close to City Hall and other spots that will loom large on his beat.last_img read more


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Sussex retail: Small is beautiful

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JLL faces tough year as earnings fall short

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Warsaw returns

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East Anglia: Talk of the towns

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Wonderwal

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PREMIUMLove for the motherland: Homesick Palestinians extol Indonesian support

first_imgTopics : Forgot Password ? Google Log in with your social account Facebook LOG INDon’t have an account? Register here Linkedin Thirty-two-year-old Palestinian migrant Mahmoud Omar can say unabashedly that he has learned to love Indonesia like he would his own wife, but that it would never measure up to his love for his homeland.Having come to Indonesia a little over a year ago, and now living comfortably as a teacher at the Al-Masyhad Islamic boarding school in Sukabumi, West Java, Omar said he felt the Indonesian people had welcomed him with open arms.He also felt the extent of Indonesia’s support for Palestinian statehood, which comes almost naturally for a country with the world’s largest Muslim population.Omar said he believed in the prophetic hadith (sayings of the Prophet Muhammad) that a group of Muslim peoples would stand firm in preserving the Al-Aqsa Mosque in Jerusalem, a sacred site for the major Abrahamic faiths and one of the flashpoints of the Palestinian-Israeli conflict…. Palestine Indonesia Middle-East-conflict US Israel peace-process solidarity UNlast_img read more


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South Sumatra resident put in quarantine for showing symptoms of pneumonia

first_imgThe patient traveled to Malaysia, which had 22 confirmed COVID-19 cases as of Tuesday, from Feb. 11 to 15.Two days after returning from Malaysia, he was admitted to RK Charitas hospital before being transferred to RSMH.Doctors at RSMH found the patient’s body temperature was below average. However, his medical record showed he had experienced a high fever.The hospital’s head of the emerging infectious diseases team, Zen Ahmad, said the hospital had experience in treating lung infections, including pneumonia. Unlike COVID-19, the common form of pneumonia is caused by bacterial infection. Patients with acute respiratory infection are normally treated in the hospital’s intensive care unit. A resident of Banyuasin regency, South Sumatra, has been put in the quarantine room of Mohammad Hosein General Hospital (RSMH) in the provincial capital of Palembang for showing symptoms of pneumonia.The hospital gave an assurance that the patient in question did not contract the novel coronavirus, which causes the COVID-19 disease. However, it stopped short of making an official diagnosis, as it was waiting for a test result.“Our initial diagnosis [of the patient] is still common pneumonia. We cannot determine whether the patient is COVID-19-positive yet, as we are still waiting for the laboratory result, which is predicted to come in two days,” RSMH acting president director Zubaedah said on Tuesday. “The patient had shown symptoms of shortness of breath before he was admitted. As of now, we can definitively say that the patient doesn’t fulfill the criteria of [being infected with] the coronavirus,” Zen said.Read also: Suspected COVID-19 patient in Maluku tests negative“Once the result comes out as negative, he will undergo the usual treatment,” Zen said. South Sumatra Health Agency surveillance department head Yusri said his office had been observing 31 people who came in through Sultan Mahmud Badaruddin II International Airport, Palembang, since Jan. 31.They were placed in quarantine for showing symptoms of the virus. After 14 days, they were all declared at least relatively stable.“As of today, none of them tested positive for COVID-19, although some of them had suffered from the common cold. Eleven of the 31 people put under our observation have been declared safe, while the remaining 20 are still being observed,” Yusri said. (dpk)Topics :last_img read more


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Trump ads will take over YouTube’s homepage on election day

first_imgAds on the YouTube masthead—as the video on the top of the homepage is known—generally run for an entire day. The exact duration of Trump’s ad buy and financial details were unclear, but estimates for the space range from hundreds of thousands of dollars to more than $1 million a day.YouTube, owned by Alphabet Inc.’s Google, lets advertisers target users based on a variety of factors, though it recently limited those options for political content. The Trump campaign bought the digital real estate nationwide, one of the people familiar with the deal said, both of whom asked not to be identified because they weren’t authorized to discuss the matter publicly.YouTube declined to comment on the deal but said it’s common for political advertisers to purchase masthead ads. After buying an ad, candidates can choose to surrender the space or restrict it to certain regions, a spokeswoman for the company said. “In the past, campaigns, PACs, and other political groups have run various types of ads leading up to Election Day,” she wrote in an email. “All advertisers follow the same process and are welcome to purchase the masthead space as long as their ads comply with our policies.” A spokesman for the Trump campaign didn’t respond to requests for comment.The move is likely to reinforce a feeling among many political analysts that Trump’s embrace of digital advertising gives him a distinct advantage over his Democratic rivals. The Trump campaign could spend as much as $500 million on digital ads and strategies, Brad Parscale, the president’s campaign manager, has said. In the immediate run up to the US presidential election and on Election Day, the homepage of YouTube is set to advertise just one candidate: Donald Trump.The president’s reelection campaign purchased the coveted advertising space atop the country’s most-visited video website for early November, said two people with knowledge of the transaction. The deal ensures Trump will be featured prominently in the key days when voters across the country prepare to head to the polls Nov. 3.While the bulk of digital ad spending typically focuses on targeting specific messages to certain audiences, the top spot on YouTube is more akin to a Super Bowl TV ad. About three-quarters of U.S. adults say they use YouTube, exceeding the reach of even Facebook, according to the Pew Research Center. In 2012, President Barack Obama’s campaign bought the YouTube masthead for Election Day before Mitt Romney had even secured the Republican nomination, according to Teddy Goff, Obama’s former digital director. “This gets to a structural problem inherent in having a contested primary against an incumbent,” said Goff, now co-founder of Precision Strategies, a consulting and marketing firm.Trump and Hillary Clinton each ran masthead ads at various times in 2016. Trump spent more money online that year than Clinton and continues to outspend most Democratic rivals now. A major exception is Michael Bloomberg, whose campaign has spent $36.9 million on Google ads, according to statistics released by Google. That’s double what Trump has spent with the company. Both Trump and Bloomberg ran YouTube masthead ads last year.Susan Wojcicki, the chief executive officer of YouTube, said in an interview with “60 Minutes” aired in December that some of Trump’s ads were rejected for violating company policies. The news program reported that more than 300 video ads submitted by the Trump campaign were taken down by Google and YouTube.Many digital ads are bought and sold through automated systems, but that wasn’t an option for Trump’s Election Day purchase. To reserve space this far in advance, advertisers must work directly with Google sales representatives.Online political advertising in the current election cycle will total $1.34 billion, more than double the levels of the last presidential election, according to EMarketer. The research firm estimates that digital spending will account for 19% of all political advertising. Facebook Inc. is the favorite platform of political campaigns, and its lenient policies have been a subject of controversy. The social network allows politicians to make false claims in their ads, whereas Google does not. Facebook offers far more granularity for campaigns to target people who fit a specific profile.After Google limited campaigns’ abilities to use demographic targeting last November, some at the company have debated going further. Google has bristled at repeated accusations of political bias, particularly from Trump and other Republicans. One potential policy discussed inside Google was to disallow masthead ads on Election Day in favor of a nonpartisan banner reminding Americans to vote, said a person with knowledge of the deliberations. Ultimately, Google decided to keep its standard practice in place.Topics :last_img read more