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One last fling in Rio?

first_imgIt wasn’t quite the dominant display of seven years ago, but the triumphant return of sprint king Usain Bolt to the scene of his coronation – the Bird’s Nest, has left coach Glen Mills with a big smile on his face and work on his hands, as he looks to make the world’s fastest man fast again, with a sub-19 seconds 200 metres and more Olympic glory topping the ‘To Do’ list. The veteran coach is not spending too much time celebrating his charge’s triple gold medal success at the just concluded IAAF World Championships in Beijing, China, having already turned his attention to the next assignment – the big one; the 2016 Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, where he expects Bolt to make his final, telling contribution to the sport and his legacy. The objective is to get Bolt back to optimal levels and prepare the Jamaican sprinter for one last assault on history, one last shot at his world records – but it won’t be easy and as Mills admitted, it’s getting more difficult for Usain to bolt.   Bolt, rebounded from an unconvincing start to his season to claim the sprint double in Beijing with times of 9.79 and 19.55. He also anchored Jamaica to a 37.36 win in the 4x100m relays. As Mills explained, it didn’t come easy for the now 11-time World Championships gold medal winner. “The difficulty was in him being able to train effectively. Every time we reached a point, his problems came back and he had to take time off to go to Germany; I think this year is the most he has ever been to Germany because that is where he goes to get his treatment because of the scientific machines and expertise that they have there,” added Mills. “I don’t remember the exact amount but it is at least twice the normal amounts so that indicates how much difficulty he had and every time he travelled he lost almost a week or two of training, so it was an up and down roller coaster ride.” Mills admitted that its getting tougher to get Bolt to reach his top level as his legs begin to wear and his much documented scoliosis issue becomes worse. “Going forward we are going to try change a number of things. Bolt is 6’ 5” and over 200 pounds with that kind of body type, plus he’s been at the top level for more than eight years and to maintain that level for so long brings serious wear and tear on his body. When you add the fact that he has a severe case of scoliosis which has implications on his  sacroiliac (SI) Joint and his whole biomechanics. As you get older the effects begin to kick in more. “We are going all out to give the Olympics one last fling and after that retirement beckons (for Bolt). If he gets through this Olympics I don’t think he will be able to continue at this level because you can see that it’s now beginning to affect him more than before,” said Mills. “Bolt is probably the greatest talent in sprinting that he world has ever seen but that said, getting him to be able to perform at his best level has its challenges. It’s like there is diamond in a particular area but to get to it or to get it out, there are a lot of dangers to be encountered. “When we got him, he was broken, we spent time fixing him and developing him into the athlete that he has turned out to be. In 2007 when he came second, then 2008, 2009 and 2012, those were glory days but in between those, especially after 2009 it has been an arduous climb, because coming out of the background work most years, by January even before we start sprinting he has to go to Germany to work on his SI Joint and his hip, calf, his back – all of this has to do with his scoliosis. We have to work within the limits that the doctor gives us,” added Mills. “Many days he is out there training, he is in a lot of pain but because we are running out of time, it’s either we call it a season or he pushes through. A lot of times when I say ‘Ok that’s enough’; he says ‘No I can do one more, I can bear it.’ He has a strong pain threshold so when he says he can’t I know that it’s really bad, he’s tough in his own way and determined and a lot of that has helped him to overcome the difficulties,” Mills shared. Another thing that keeps both gentlemen going is the drive to see the sprinter lower his own world records, especially his 19.19 200m mark, which Mills believes is more realistic, but only if Bolt’s preparation is relatively uninterrupted next season. “I’d love to see it again (world record), I don’t think it’s out of the realm of possibility but he needs to stay healthy, significantly long enough to be able to train the way he needs to train in order to achieve those performances. He wants to run sub-19 before he goes and we will try for it,” said Mills. “He doesn’t speak about the 100m (9.58) because it will be much more difficult for him to run that 9.58 but it is possible for him (200m world record).” A sub-19 200m? That will certainly require some ‘bolting’, but who is going to doubt the big Jamaican this time?last_img read more

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‘Miracles can happen’ with Guiao as Asian Games coach

first_imgPutin’s, Xi’s ruler-for-life moves pose challenges to West NLEX center Asi Taulava could also be in the lineup to bolster the team’s frontline.PBA Commissioner Willie Marcial lent his support for the Elasto Painters with a change in schedule for the team’s games in the Governors’ Cup.Marcial said the Elasto Painters could possibly play in successive games once they come back to the Philippines.“They will be gone for 15 days so when they return they could play for successive game days,” said Marcial in Filipino. “The owners, thankfully, gave their approval and what they did is not just for the country but also for the PBA.”Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next “Coach Yeng has accepted after a lot of discussion with the owners and coach Caloy will be part of his staff,” added Samahang Basketbol ng Pilipinas President Al Panlilio.Guiao already became the country’s coach in 2008 leading a team that had Arwind Santos, Cyrus Baguio, James Yap, Kerby Raymundo, and Gabe Norwood.Panlilio said it was Rain or Shine owner Raymond Yu who “insisted” that Guiao be the coach of the team.“It was Mr. Raymond Yu who insisted that we bring in coach Yeng,” said Panlilio. “Coach Yeng was sensitive to coach Caloy, they had a conversation about it and it turned out well.”Guiao’s first assignment is to rush the final lineup that will include seven or eight Elasto Painters, Gilas Cadets Abu Tratter, Ricci Rivero, and Kobe Paras.ADVERTISEMENT Lacson: Calamity fund cut; where did P4 billion go? Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Trump assembles a made-for-TV impeachment defense team In fight vs corruption, Duterte now points to Ayala, MVP companies as ‘big fish’ ‘High crimes and misdemeanors’: Trump impeachment trial begins MOST READ CAS confirm 2 Russians to be stripped of 2008 Olympic medals LATEST STORIES It has been two years since Yeng Guiao and Rain or Shine parted ways after a five-year relationship that produced a Governors’ Cup and one Commissioner’s Cup.ADVERTISEMENT Palace OKs total deployment ban on Kuwait OFWs Guiao has since moved on to NLEX where he’s currently trying to steer the Road Warriors to elite status in the PBA while the Elasto Painters are still on a steady course with Caloy Garcia.And although Guiao and the Elasto Painters are on different paths in the PBA, the two will have a reunion and will represent the Philippines in the 2018 Asian Games.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup titleSPORTSAfter winning title, time for LA Tenorio to give back to Batangas folkSPORTSTim Cone still willing to coach Gilas but admits decision won’t be ‘simple yes or no’Guiao was initially indifferent to his appointment as the Elasto Painters’ head coach in Indonesia, but changed his stance when team governor Mamerto Mondragon and Garcia talked to him about his temporary responsibility.“With coach Yeng miracles can happen,” said Mondragon after the PBA’s board meeting Thursday at the league’s office. “The players are very happy they will be coached by coach Yeng, because let’s admit it, coach Caloy has not international experience.” View comments Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award Report: Disney dropping the ‘Fox’ from movie studio names Lights inside SMX hall flicker as Duterte rants vs Ayala, Pangilinan anew DepEd’s Taal challenge: 30K students displacedlast_img read more


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I will not dignify GHK Lall’s idiocy that hints of a communist hegemony

first_imgDear Editor,I write in response to a letter to the Editor from the Chairman of the Gold Board, Gabriel (GHK) Lall (Kaieteur news – January 28, 2019). This remigrant with intellectual leanings is usually worth a read for style if not content. Unfortunately, now that his brown bag appointment and the accompanying perks are under threat, an unvarnished Lall emerges to bark for his political masters. Mindful of “Dem boys” advice of the same day, I am nevertheless risking ‘jail for a year’ in refuting Lall’s roll in the mud pit.GHK begins with suggestions that an Irfaan Ali Presidency would lead to a systematic reversal of the limited ethical and reputational gains. One would hope that there would be reversal of the reputation the Granger Administration has gained for Guyana for being “limited” as exposed in its negotiations with ExxonMobil; the inability of the Granger Cabinet to recognise that the “private approach” brought to them by David Patterson was illegal and very obviously unethical; that spending $327 million of taxpayers’ money to rent a house that cost $25 million (paid for with the rental deposit) was an exercise in barefaced corruption and cronyism.The list of mismanaged projects and corrupt transactions that have involved Granger and his Administration in three short years outstrips any other two-decade period in our nation’s history; in this alone APNU+AFC have excelled. Ironically in the same edition that contains Lall’s misgivings, there is a stern warning from Jan Mangal (former presidential advisor on oil and gas) that the Energy Department should not engage in one-on-one negotiations as “the data exists to prove that these negotiations are highly prone to corruption”.Editor, GHK Lall’s attempt to place the blame for sloth in Guyana’s passage and implementation of the Anti-Money Laundering legislation on the previous PPP/C Administration in an exercise to rewrite history; an Orwellian exercise better suited to the talents of our current Attorney General whom is versed in this practice and whom is already seated upon Rocinante and cloaked in an armor of imbecility. GHK Lall should note that Williams has no need for a Sancho Panza thus far, handling punishment meted out by his bête noir with equal measures of calm and delusion.Lall foolishly posits the argument that a “rotten bureaucracy” will return in defence of the super-sized hog feeding at the public trough, this sounder of swine created by tripling the number of Ministries and departments by David Granger and his team. The cost of Government is now in excess of $70 billion dollars a year.GHK Lall has the temerity to look up from the trough long enough to write about Irfaan Ali, who increased housing stock by 28,456 units, while managing the installation of 25 wells and 7 water treatment plants, increased access to treated water from 20 per cent of the population to over 50 per cent, in addition to his work to nurture the fledgling tourism sector.Irfaan Ali managed three Ministries; one Minister; one salary; measurable progress over a six-year period. Compare to Granger’s passel of incompetents who promise much, are paid higher salaries and delivered less than 1000 house lots in three and a half years.Editor, I will not dignify GHK Lall’s idiocy that hints of a communist hegemony as those cold war ideological arguments are as fossilised as the author. I would suggest David Granger that in future he not send a hog with his nose buried too deep in the trough to offer arguments on his behalf, for this one seems to be offended by his own stench, unbalanced mentally by his diet on rotting cabbage and is way out of depth rolling in the mud. Like the tiger in the aforementioned “Dem boys seh” I am now willing to serve my year in jail for debating with a jackass.Respectfully,Robin Singhlast_img read more


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GCCI, CDB host workshop on management development

first_imgThe Caribbean Development Bank (CDB), in collaboration with the Georgetown Chamber of Commerce and Industry (GCCI) and the Tourism and Hospitality Association of Guyana (THAG), will host a three-day workshop to enhance decision-making skills among organisations.THAG Executive Director Treina Butts, former GCCI President Lance Hinds and new GCCI President Vishnu Doerga at the opening ceremony of the MfDR workshopThe workshop is being held at Cara Lodge, Georgetown, under the theme “Managing for Development Results (MfDR) for Business Support Organisations in Guyana”.MfDR is a management strategy that focuses on using performance information to improve decision-making. The MfDR strategy involves using practical tools for strategic planning, risk management, process monitoring, and outcome evaluation.Representatives from various local businesses and Business Support Organisations (BSOs) who are involved in coordinating and facilitating technical assistance to Micro, Small and Medium Sized Enterprises (MSMEs) are participating in the intensive three-day workshop.The sessions will see participants being trained in MfDR strategy that will empower local BSOs to improve their chances of garnering funding from international donors for developmental projects because MfDR tools are internationally recognised as the standard.In addition, the workshop will enable the participants to design quality proposals which will display a response to the needs and priorities of the community and key stakeholders. BSOs are being held accountable by international donors to demonstrate results, and they must prove that they are providing value for money.One of the facilitators will be Executive Director of THAG, Treina Butts, who had participated in a Training/Facilitator support workshop in Barbados last year.Speaking at the opening ceremony on Thursday, Butts said during the three-day session she will enlighten the participants on MfDR. She noted that MfDR goals were clear and measurable, limited in number and concrete with time-bound targets.“MfDR is more than a methodology, it is a way of thinking and acting built on practical toolbox for improved public management,” she stated.According to Butts, the MfDR cycle involves five core stages: setting goals and agreeing on targets and strategies, allocating the available resources to activities that will contribute to achievement of the desired results, monitoring and evaluating whether resources allocated are making the intended difference, reporting on performance to the public and feeding that information back into the decision-making process.Meanwhile, GCCI President Vishnu Doerga encouraged the participants to share the knowledge they gained from the workshop with their respective colleagues to spread MfDR practices.“The only way to know if you really understand something is to teach it. So I’d urge you to get back into your organisations and teach your colleagues the things you have learnt… It’s very frustrating to push organisations forward when nobody understands what you are talking about,” he stated.last_img read more


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Criminal Lawyer Jason Doe Solves: The Case of the Surprised Defendant

first_imgCharacters in this StoryJason Doe—defense counsel who knew there was the truth somewhereJanet Dagoseh—she was facing preliminary hearing to establish her role in her husband’s deathDaniel Sackor—the judge who was affable in his demeanorJoshua Sackor—the prosecutor who told the defense: ‘your witness…’Sam Weah—who was accused but claimed he was innocentSamson Dagoseh—the decedent whose death linked his wife, who linked the accusedDorcas Soko—the woman whose name ended proceedingsA triumphant atmosphere filled the courtroom as Judge Daniel Sackor entered at 9 a.m. at the June 5th sitting with an air of affability, bordered on many years of judging criminal cases. The defendant, Janet Dagoseh, was facing a preliminary hearing in the case in which she was denying culpability in the death of her husband by fire in an incident in central Monrovia on May 25.State prosecutor Joshua Sackor walked his client through the night of the incident, to establish her innocence.“How long had you been married?”“We had been married for ten years.”“And he was a wonderful man?”“Yes, he was a man of my heart.”“Did you have any reason to kill your husband?”The defendant hesitated, wiping her eyes with a handkerchief, and gave a deep breath before adjusting her position in the witness stand: “This question has been thrown at me by many. The truth is, I had no reason to kill my husband of ten years. And if anybody thinks there is any reason, let them prove it.“Like all human relations, marriage has its ups and downs; and that, I think, is normal. That would not give me cause to hurt another human being, let alone my wonderful husband.”“Thank you,” the defense counsel said, as he walked towards his bench. He searched through documents on the table and after a couple of seconds made three steps towards the defendant. With an unmistakable air of triumph, he solicited: “Tell us about the night your husband died, Mrs. Dagoseh.”The courtroom remained silent.“It was the night that I wish I had not lived to hear about,” she was barely audible, and the spectators in the courtroom leaned forward.“I had left the house about 6 p.m. for choir practice. The church is located in Sinkor, and I rode a motorbike for the almost twenty-five-minute ride. Practice ended about 7:30 p.m. There was a meeting that caused me to stay a little longer so I did not leave the church until about 8:30 p.m.“By 9:00 p.m., I was nearing the Benson and Gurley Street intersection when I saw the huge fire and defendant Sam Weah coming from the house, along with lots of people hurrying in the direction of the well-lit sky. Others milled around. I overheard their conversation about the fire which had killed a man they claimed was drunk in his bed.“I did not think about any danger to me or whether Mr. Weah had anything to do with the fire till I got closer to the house when a neighbor met me and wondered how I managed to survive the fire.” She halted and wiped the tears from her eyes.She continued, “I came to myself about 30 minutes later in a hospital bed because I had fainted. It was after I had been told of my husband’s death that rumors began to sweep across the community that I was apparently involved in my husband’s death since I was not killed in the incident.“I am a broken woman and tired of life after losing my husband and the only house my parents left for me. My parents died in a blazing fire in 2009; I was the only survivor…” her voice broke again and there were murmurs of sympathy from the audience.“When Weah saw me,” she continued, “he began to run through the large crowd of people.”“Your witness,” the prosecutor said, turning to defense counsel Jason Doe.It was clear that the woman’s testimony, along with previous ones suggest circumstantially that Sam Weah could have something to do with the blaze. However, Jason Doe knew there was too much for Mrs. Dagoseh to gain with her husband’s death and to pin it on another, an innocent man, was hardly the way to do it. The accused did not factor too much in the prosecution’s deliberations with Mrs. Dagoseh but it was apparent that Judge Sackor had drawn up some conclusions, but nonetheless, the lawyer knew he now had the trump card to burst the case wide open. From closer observation of proceedings, he knew there was something fishy and he would chase whatever it was to ensure justice not only for his client but for the man whose charred body was discovered after the blaze.The lawyer decided to ignore a certain portion of the case and concentrate on the most pertinent points that could make any woman, the greedy type, get the unholy belief that they could do away with their husbands and turn around to enjoy their loot. As the lawyer approached the witness, he turned momentarily to the accused, whose eyes were filled with tears. The lawyer knew Weah had been a frequent visitor to the decedent’s house, as it was brought out in previous hearings, and it was clear that Mrs. Dagoseh was a cunning, cold-hearted woman of steel. The lawyer swept his head away from the accused with a reassuring smile and strolled towards the witness. The courtroom tensed as ceiling and standing fans hummed, overshadowing the spectators with the afternoon breeze. Janet Dagoseh Lifted herself as if to say “I’m ready Jason, go ahead,” regained her composure, rolled her eyes, and threw her head back as defense counsel Jason Doe stood before her. A temporary silence followed which unnerved her, and unable to withstand the silence, she called for the tears that had been her companion since her husband died in the blazing fire that consumed two other houses and had rendered her homeless.“Your parents died in a fire disaster in 2009?”“Yes.”“You were the only survivor?”“Yes.”“Your husband, or rather your late husband Samson Dagoseh worked for the United Consulting Company?”“Yes,” she said, “he was an accountant.”“He worked there for ten years?”“And you are aware that he had an insurance policy that says at his death you, his wife, would benefit from a life insurance amount of US$100,000?”The prosecutor was on his feet, “Leading the witness; what is the relevance of this line of questioning, your honor?”Judge Sackor lowered his eyeglasses and said, “Will the state prosecutor please tell us the point of this question?“Your Honor,” Jason Doe said, “I am trying to establish a motive for murder. I am aware of the issue of relevance and the court will agree that the defendant has had a history of a fire incident that claimed her parents, leaving to her benefit a sizable amount when she had just married the decedent…”“Very well,” Judge Sackor said, “you may continue.”“Thank you, Your Honor,” Jason Doe said, and turning to the defendant, said. “You are supposed to earn 100,000 United States dollars as an insurance benefit from your husband’s death?”“Yes,” she said, lowering her head.“The last time you had a similar experience, which was in 2009; besides the house that you inherited, you received an insurance benefit of 175,000 United States dollars?”“Yes.”“At the time you had just married the decedent?”“Yes.”“You told the court that on the day of the tragic fire incident, on May 25, you went to choir practice in Sinkor and you arrived home around 9 pm?”“Yes.”Jason Doe, in an excited tone, said, “We are in the rainy season, Mrs. Dagoseh?”“Yes,” she said, “but the rains are not falling every day.”“But on May 25, how was the rain on that day?”“It did not rain that much.”“On the night the fire killed your husband, how much fell?”“I cannot remember.”“But you remember that you went to choir practice?”“I don’t miss choir practice.”“Yes, you don’t but the day fire killed your husband you went to choir practice, you can only remember that you went to choir practice and not how much rain fell that day?”“Yes.”“What did you tell your friend Dorcas Soko, who visited you at the hospital the day after the fire killed your husband?”The defendant appeared surprised at the question and stared at the prosecutor.“I spoke to her as a friend.”“What did you say to Mrs. Soko when she told you that she believed you were bewitched, making reference to your past experience when your parents died? Remember you are under oath.”“I did not mean what I said.”“Tell the court what you said to Mrs. Soko.”Suddenly, the defendant slumped down in her chair, out of the spectators’ view. The bailiff, sheriff deputies, and several police officers rushed forward to help. Judge Sackor readjusted himself on the bench and with a grin, beckoned the defense and the prosecutor to have a conference in his chambers.But before that the judge picked up his gavel and struck twice, announcing the adjournment of the case.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more


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Government will take urgent steps to remove impediments – President

first_imgAccess to educationPresident David Granger has said that education is the gateway to equality, and it will pave the way for employment and empowerment.President David Granger presenting the Presidential Awards Shield to the Head teacher of the Kako Primary School, Stephanie Krammer-GeorgeSpeaking on Thursday during a visit to Kako Village in the Cuyuni-Mazaruni section of Guyana known as Region 7, the President said it is for this reason that his Administration has been placing much emphasis on boosting teachers’ capacity, and enhancing education delivery and access through increased budgetary allocations and the introduction of innovative programmes, such as the Buses, Boats, Bicycles + Books and Breakfast (the Five Bs) initiative.President David Granger, along with Minister Dawn Hastings-Williams and Head Teacher Stephanie Krammer-George, participated in a ceremonial ribbon-cutting exercise to commission the newly-constructed dining hall at the school.The Head of State had visited the village to join the residents and students in celebrating the 29th anniversary of the Kako Primary School, where he told them that, as President of Guyana, he is a partner in the development of their village and the country as a whole.“We want to make sure that every child is given the best possible start in life. If you cannot read, if you cannot write, if you cannot count, if you cannot spell, then doors will be closed to you… Every Guyanese is equal, and every Guyanese must be given equal opportunities; and the way to achieve that equality is through education. If we want to ensure that children have equal opportunities, we must ensure that they have equal access to education,” the President is quoted as saying by the Ministry of the Presidency.In this regard, he urged the Toshao, village councillors, members of the regional authority, and residents to inform the Government of any impediments to access to education, so that urgent steps can be taken to remove them.“If there is anything keeping a child from school, let us know, and we will try to solve that problem,” he said.President Granger spoke of the importance of education in securing meaningful employment. He noted that in this age of technology, people must advance their skills so that not only can they be employable, but able to create employment for themselves and for others. Technology, he said, can help people to venture into agro-processing, whereby they can process their ground provisions, fruits and vegetables and seek competitive markets in and out of the country, rather than having to take their raw produce out of the village to sell, risking spoilage and other such disadvantages.The President said that is why the Government is working to ensure that communities like Kako get a reliable supply of energy, which is vital if residents are to move in the direction of agro-processing.The Head of State also urged the residents to ensure that they stay informed on what is happening in their country, and what programmes and projects are being undertaken for their benefit. “We want you to be educated and empowered. You must be able to exercise your rights as citizens by being fully informed,” he said.Public Affairs Minister Dawn Hastings-Williams, who is from Kako Village and had attended the Kako Primary School, urged the children to keep studying and to ensure that they attend school regularly.She noted that the institution continues to churn out individuals who have gone on to excel in their various fields, such as head teachers and health workers. These persons have served not only Kako, but other hinterland communities.The President and Minister Hastings-Williams have handed over a quantity of equipment to the village, including a music system and sports gear; and with the Christmas season fast approaching, they also distributed toys to the children of Kako.Chairman of Region Seven, Gordon Bradford, and several regional officials were also in attendance at yesterday’s event, which culminated with the cutting of the ribbon to officially commission a new dining hall for the students of the school.last_img read more


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Rolla prepares for 100th anniversary celebration

first_imgHe said his family was trying to escape the hard times that had plagued them as farmers in the United States, and they were lured to Western Canada by the promise of open prairie and fertile soil. He said they stayed because of the beauty of the land and the quality of the people who came to settle there later.Now 80 years old, Miller said he has seen Rolla change quite a bit from when he was a child. He said he remembers the rough gravel roads – where “you did more miles up and down then you did forward” – before they were paved. He added there certainly a lot more people living in and around the community now than he remembers growing up.”In the early days you might see one vehicle a day on the road, and I know I go out of my gate and I count the cars behind me and in front of me and there’s usually an average of five.”His daughter added the celebration is very special for her as well, as she has many fond memories of growing up in Rolla. The celebration is certainly ambitious, as it’s anticipated to cost $260,000. The committee has applied for not-for-profit status in order to be eligible for a federal grant of up to $200,000 provided for community anniversary celebrations such as this one. They propose to raise other revenues through registration fees, souvenir and calendar sales, donations and sponsorships.She was able to secure one such sponsorship through the regional district, as the board approved a $5,000 grant, as well as a letter of support for the committee’s federal grant request, later in their meeting.Loiselle’s father, John Miller, was in the gallery that morning, and he said the centennial celebration is very important to him personally.”When I think about all of things my grandparents and my dad had to go through to get here, it’s really significant to me,” he said. “You wouldn’t believe the problems they had – it took them 12 years to get here from Rolla, Missouri, and they lost two children along the way.”Advertisement It was in 1912 that Lea Miller and his family settled in the area – located about 23 kilometres northeast of Dawson Creek – after making the long trek from Rolla, Missouri, where their new home took its name from. As chair of the volunteer committee organizing the centennial celebration, Janet Loiselle, great granddaughter of Lea and Mary Miller, took the opportunity at a Peace River Regional District Meeting held in Rolla this morning to explain the festivities that are tentatively planned and a little bit of the history behind the community.She said the celebration is slated for Aug. 3-5, 2012. She said they hope to host a wine and cheese reception with live entertainment on Friday night; a farmers’ market, more entertainment and ball games throughout Saturday and a dance that evening; and a pancake breakfast and church service on Sunday.Other proposed activities include fireworks, horse-and-wagon rides, children’s games and much more. She said transportation to the events will be arranged for residents who need it in Rolla and in Dawson Creek.- Advertisement -If feasible, they would like to arrange for wagon rides between Grande Prairie and Dawson Creek, she added.The committee is also hoping to arrange for artistic signage to put up around the community, a new mural to be designed for the community hall, and a commemorative marker to be put in a location that has yet to be decided.”We’re looking forward to a great weekend,” said Loiselle.Advertisementlast_img read more


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Mixed messages

first_imgHe got 20 to 30 texts a day and felt obligated to respond to them. His family wasn’t prepared. He had never used the feature on his phone that much before. They soon changed to an unlimited text-messaging plan, but the damage was done. “At first, the number of texts was unbelievable,” said Crist, a junior at Notre Dame High of Sherman Oaks. “It’s definitely overwhelming at times. I felt like I couldn’t do anything about it.” It’s stories like this that led to the NCAA banning all text messaging from the recruiting process late last month. The rule will go into effect in August. Even with his painful financial experience, Crist isn’t against text messaging used in recruiting. “I’m in the middle on it,” Crist said. “It’s definitely easier, quicker and not as intrusive as talking on the phone. You don’t have to respond to them right when you get them. It just needs limitations.” None of the recruits interviewed for this article were in favor of the NCAA’s decision to eliminate texting all together. Text messaging, or texting, is the preferred method of communication for teenagers these days. “Everyone has a Sidekick, AIM (AOL Instant Messenger) on their phone and texting,” Birmingham of Lake Balboa linebacker Donovan Carter said. “It’s kind of like, if you want to fit in, you have to get that. I know a lot of people who text more than they talk.” Normal telephone conversations and e-mails are like CDs, still used occasionally but rendered out of date by the iPod. Milton Knox, Carter’s teammate and a top running back recruit, enjoyed being able to show his friends notes from national champion Florida coach Urban Meyer. “I loved it,” Knox said. “I’m going to miss it. (Coaches) would send little inspirational messages just to say hello and to make sure you were thinking about school, not girls. It was cool knowing someone cared about you.” But those daily greetings may be where things got out of hand, Long Beach State basketball coach Dan Monson said. “Everyone’s trying to keep up with the Joneses and it spirals out of control a little bit,” Monson said. “You can’t let a kid hear from another coach more than he hears from you. That’s just bad recruiting.” Many of those texts come during school, right in the middle of a class. Students know to keep their phones on vibrate in order not to disrupt class, but there are no reminders to silence phones like there are at a movie theater. Sometimes they forget. Crist admitted that he’s gotten in trouble on occasion when his phone goes off in class at Notre Dame High. The NCAA has rules that coaches can only call a recruit twice a week during contact periods, and then there are no-contact periods when phone calls are not allowed. Coaches found a way around that rule by text messaging a kid to call them. That burdens the athlete’s family with additional cost from the long-distance phone calls. Five years ago, text messaging wasn’t an issue in Steve Smith’s recruitment from Taft of Woodland Hills to USC. His mother, Audrey, set up a separate phone line for coaches to call to talk to Steve, who was recently taken in the second round of the NFL draft by the New York Giants. She would usually answer the phone and talk to the coaches first. Technology changed quickly. It’s only been in the past three years that text messaging became not only a part of recruiting but the most-used means of contact. During the recruitment of her next son, Malcolm, this past year, Audrey felt out of the loop. “In my opinion, they’re cutting out the family aspect because the family is going to make the decision, but they’re building a reputation strictly with the kids,” Audrey Smith said. “Coaches used to call home and talk to the family. Now the texts go straight to the kid.” Showing the divide that generations have on this issue, Malcolm disagreed. “I thought texting was good,” said Malcolm, who decided to follow his brother from Taft to USC. “That was my way to respond to them without interrupting my life. I didn’t have to be bothered with a phone call. I’m sure if coaches had something they wanted to say to the parents, they could call or the parents could call.” The American Football Coaches Association tried to get the NCAA to delay voting on the issue of text messaging until it could be studied further. Though the NCAA declined, David Berst, the NCAA Division I vice president, took the unusual step of saying the matter could be readdressed next year. “They’re open to considering proposals in the next legislative cycle,” Berst said of the NCAA board of directors. “For now, it’s been eliminated.” Monson said he thought the ban was to give people time to step back and re-evaluate the issue. “Everyone agrees that text messaging is helpful, but it’s also clearly gotten out of control,” Monson said. “We have to see what’s the lesser of twoevils.” USC basketball coach Tim Floyd, notorious among those who know him as phobic when it comes to technology – he doesn’t even use the Internet – said he has never sent a text message but that all of his assistants do. He thinks it would be fair to set some limitations on text messaging, like not allowing them during school hours. “It has been very beneficial in communicating with prospects,” Floyd said. “It was never understood by the board members who mandated this rule. If a kid doesn’t want to respond to your text, he’s more or less telling you that he’s not interested and the school can move on. The kid has the option on whether or not to respond.” Karen Crist, Dayne’s mother, said that athletes hearing from these iconic coaches they’ve grown up watching on TV are too impressed to understand that ignoring the texts is a choice. “In the beginning, Dayne believed that he had to respond to everybody,” Karen Crist said. “I told him, `You don’t have to respond to someone who says `Hey Dayne, have a nice day at school.”‘ But he wasn’t prepared for that. Kids don’t know who they want to talk to and when they should respond.” Dayne found a way to make the texts stop before August. He committed to Notre Dame at the end of April, before even finishing his junior year of high school. By taking himself off the market, his texts dropped to maybe 10 a week. “I couldn’t imagine doing this for another eight months,” Karen Crist said. “It was horrific. There’s got to be a better way to deal with it.” matthew.kredell@dailynews.com (818) 713-3607160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! Dayne Crist still hears about it whenever his mom wants to remind him that he’s not quite the perfect son he appears to be as a star quarterback with stellar grades and a scholarship waiting for him at Notre Dame. There will always be that one mishap hanging over his head: the $500 cell phone bill. It was February of this year, the time when football coaches around the country close out one recruiting class and start right up on the next group. As one of the most sought-after players in the nation, he saw his cell phone begin lighting up. Charlie Weiss, Pete Carroll, Bobby Bowden, Lloyd Carr and Bill Callahan were just some of the coaches from whom he started receiving text messages on a daily basis. last_img

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Unbeaten Harambee Stars juniors sail into CECAFA semis

first_imgThe team is now set for the semifinals set to be played on August 28, while the final has been scheduled for August 30.Starting XIAlvin Odari (GK), James Gachago, Isaac Mugweru, Robby Mangi, Brian Kamau, Rajab Umar, Kevin Wangaya, Andrew Odhiambo, Gil Harel, Teddy Sirma, Khamis Nyale.SubstitutesKennedy Okumu, Ibrahim Mone, Joseph Munala, Andrew Waliaula, Zein Mwakitawa, Mike Churchill, Alvin Kasavuli, Karl Murugu, Brian Osoro0Shares0000(Visited 73 times, 1 visits today) 0Shares0000Unbeaten Harambee Stars juniors sail  into CECAFA semis. Photo/FKFNAIROBI, Kenya, Aug 22 – Harambee Stars juniors sailed through to the semifinals of the CECAFA Under-15 Championship unbeaten after edging out hosts Eritrea 2-1 in their last Pool A match played in Asmara.Kevin Wangaya and Ibrahim Mone scored a goal apiece as the national Under-15 team recorded three wins out of four matches that saw them beat Somalia, Sudan and hosts Eritrea, only dropping points to Burundi.last_img read more


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Monaco deny Mourinho approach, PSG ‘confident’ of beating Man United to £100m Ronaldo deal and Gerrard IS set for Liverpool return – Paper review

first_imgHere is a selection of the stories from Thursday’s newspapers…French club Monaco took to Twitter to deny they have made an approach for under-pressure Chelsea boss Jose Mourinho, after shareholder Alessandro Proto claimed they were interested in appointing the 52-year-old Portuguese.Paris Saint-Germain are confident they will beat Manchester United to the £100m signing of Real Madrid forward Cristiano Ronaldo. (The Sun) Liverpool manager Jurgen Klopp is prepared to hand former captain Steven Gerrard a role at Anfield, in keeping with the club’s ‘long-term strategy’. (The Independent) Chelsea, Manchester United, Manchester City all want to convince Pep Guardiola to turn his back on Bayern Munich and be their next manager. (The Sun) Manchester City are NOT interested in a loan move for New York City maestro Andrea Pirlo in the MLS off-season. (Manchester Evening News)Monaco are keen to push forward in their pursuit of Chelsea starlet Charly Musonda, after having a £10m offer turned down the summer. The 19-year-old Belgian is highly rated within the Blues academy but the club are struggling to get youth players anywhere near their first-team squad. (Daily Mirror)Tottenham are preparing to make a double swoop for Gent pair Laurent Depoitre and Moses Simon in January. Depoitre, 26, has scored six goals in 14 games this season and Spurs will send scouts to watch both the 6ft 3ins striker and his teammate Simon. (Daily Mail)Rivals Manchester United and Liverpool are ready to go head-to-head for Danish wonderkid Emre Mor, after the 18-year-old’s performances for FC Nordsjaelland Under 19s earned rave reviews among Europe’s top scouts. (Daily Mail)And here’s the latest talkSPORT.com headlines…Steven Gerrard back at Liverpool is the ‘last thing’ Jurgen Klopp needs, insists Dietmar HamannChelsea News: ‘Self-destruct mode’ Jose Mourinho in danger of damaging reputation as managerial great, talkSPORT toldExclusive – Harry Redknapp on Van Gaal boos: ‘Man United fans were spoilt under Sir Alex Ferguson’Former Chelsea striker Didier Drogba rules out move during MLS off-seasonVIDEO: Fabian Delph celebrating Manchester City’s win on his own in front of the fansLeeds United latest: Owner Massimo Cellino ‘no longer wishes to sell to fans’last_img read more