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Olivier-Winning Sunny Afternoon Sets Closing Date in the West End

first_img The Kinks bio-musical Sunny Afternoon will take the stage for the last time on October 29 after playing at the Harold Pinter Theatre for over two years. A national tour of the production, directed by Edward Hall, will begin on August 19 at the Manchester Opera House.The show is set against the backdrop of a Britain caught mid-swing between the conservative ’50s and riotous ’60s and features a book by Joe Penhall, along with music and lyrics and original story by Ray Davies. Sunny Afternoon explores the euphoric highs and agonizing lows of The Kinks and features some of the band’s classic songs, including “You Really Got Me,” “Waterloo Sunset” and “Lola.”Sunny Afternoon was the best performing show at the 2015 Olivier Awards, winning four awards including Best New Musical. Kinks frontman Ray Davies won for Outstanding Achievement in Music. The cast includes Doctor Who’s Danny Horn, Oliver Hoare, Tom Whitelock and Damien Walsh. At certain performances, the role of Ray Davies is played by Ryan O’Donnell. View Comments Danny Horn in ‘Sunny Afternoon’last_img read more


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Judith Light Begins MCC’s Season with All the Ways To Say I Love You

first_img Show Closed This production ended its run on Oct. 23, 2016 As previously reported, two-time Tony winner Judith Light is returning to the New York stage. The Transparent Emmy nominee will begin MCC Theater’s 2016-2017 season in Neil LaBute’s All the Ways To Say I Love You. Directed by Leigh Silverman, the solo show follows a high school English teacher and guidance counselor as she recalls her experiences with a former student. The show kicks off on September 6, and the off-Broadway drama is scheduled to run through October 9. Light and the creative team caught up with the press on August 11; check out the pics! Related Shows All the Ways To Say I Love You Judith Lightcenter_img Star Files View Comments Judith Light(Photo: Emilio Madrid-Kuser)last_img read more


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Okieriete Onaodowan Will Replace Josh Groban in The Great Comet

first_img View Comments Prior to Hamilton, Onaodowan appeared on Broadway in Rocky and Cyrano de Bergerac. His additional stage credits include The Shipment, Luce and Neighbors off-Broadway and the national tour of American Idiot.Featuring a book and score by Dave Malloy (who will play the title role at select performances this spring) and directed by Rachel Chavkin, The Great Comet is inspired by an excerpt of War and Piece and immerses audiences in a story of young love-turned-epic romance.Onaodowan will join a cast that currently includes Denée Benton as Natasha, Lucas Steele as Anatole, Brittain Ashford as Sonya, Amber Gray as Helene and Grace McLean as Marya D. Related Shows Natasha, Pierre & the Great Comet of 1812 Okieriete Onaodowan(Photo: Emilio Madrid-Kuser) And what about Pierre? Don’t worry; Oak’s got it covered. Okieriete Onaodowan, who originated the dual roles of Hercules Mulligan and James Madison in Broadway’s Hamilton, will step into the spotlight of Natasha, Pierre and the Great Comet of 1812. Onaodowan will assume the role of Pierre from current star Josh Groban on July 3.As previously reported, Groban will take his final bow on July 2. Onaodowan is currently scheduled to stay in the show through September 4. Show Closed This production ended its run on Sept. 3, 2017last_img read more


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4-H Environmental Education

first_imgWhen Georgia leaders piled off Bus Trip IV at the Rock Eagle 4-H Center near Eatonton, Ga.,they learned a valuable lesson: good teaching isn’t just in classrooms. One more class listened intently as costumed teachers from the living history program showedhow to cut a shingle. The leaders saw firsthand what it means to learn from Mother Nature. As they sat in a circle,an environmental education teacher let them meet a king snake and a boa constrictor. Thebraver students touched and even held the snakes. The Rock Eagle stop brought the leaders to the 4-H environmental education program. Thisnationally recognized model program, begun in 1979 by the University of Georgia ExtensionService, has a simple plan. It lets nature teach the classes. Each year, more than 40,000 students leave their schools and reconvene classes outdoors.They meet at 4-H centers around the state: the Rock Eagle woods, Jekyll Island seashore,Wahsega mountaintop or Tybee Island marshes. Another class toured the Natural History Museum. There Diane Davies, who developed theprogram and the museum, said they welcome students to interact with the exhibits. The Georgia Partnership for Excellence in Education sponsored the trip. Throughout the weekof Nov. 11, the leaders toured 23 of the state’s most innovative classrooms and learningcenters. The tour moved on to other shining stars of the Georgia educational system. Its aim was toapplaud success in Georgia schools and communities, educate state leaders about local effortsand help communities join the statewide effort to improve education. The bus trip brings together business, education and government leaders with a common aim.Each is committed to making Georgia education better. “Students will never hear ‘don’t touch’ in this museum,” she said. “They learn so much morewhen they can experience things.” “They used red cedar,” a teacher said, “because it lasts so long. The shingles would probablybe around long after the house under them crumbled.” Anne Hancock, chair of the steering committee for the bus trip, called Rock Eagle “awonderful example of partnering and caring. We are proud of what you do here.” The 23 stops were chosen from almost 100 requests to the GPEE.last_img read more


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Chill Down

first_img IT’S LOVELY WEATHER for peach and blueberry farmers who need cold temperatures now to help their trees and bushes set a good crop. Gerard Krewer, a UGA horticulturist, said temperatures between 35 degrees and 40 degrees are ideal for providing vital chill hours.ÿ J. Cannon, UGA CAES The bone-chilling cold of early January was exactly what Georgia peach and blueberry growers need, say University of Georgia experts. But they need a lot more. “At the moment, we’re praying for cold weather,” said Gerard Krewer, an Extension Service fruit horticulturist with the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. center_img An unseasonably mild fall brought middle- and south Georgia into the new year with the fewest chill hours to this point in 40 years. Chill hours are the time below 45 degrees between Oct. 1 and Feb. 15. “The chill hours are running about half of the normal accumulation across most of south Georgia,” Krewer said. Without the needed chill hours, the trees will bloom and set some fruit, Krewer said. But they’ll lose the fruit when the leaves don’t develop quickly after fruit set. Without leaves that photosynthesize to create sugars, the tree can’t support the fruit. If we’re just 100 or so chill hours short, we may get some of a crop, he said. But it probably won’t be a good one. At 200 hours short, the crop would be very poor. However, it’s still early in the winter – too early to make a solid prediction of crop yields. Chill hours can accumulate at a rate of 168 every week. But with six weeks remaining before the cutoff date, Krewer calculates that growers we need a solid month of below-45 temperatures to get enough chill to make a good crop. “And we rarely receive continuous chilling in south Georgia,” he said. Chill requirements vary by the peach and blueberry type. But so far, no varieties grown in middle and south Georgia have enough chill hours to properly set and develop fruit. Peach trees can still benefit from chill hours after Feb. 15, Krewer said, but they aren’t as effective as those before. At this point, Krewer and Georgia peach farmers are hoping for cold weather and a state registration for a chemical called “Dormex.” This material, already widely used around the world, can substitute for 100 to 150 chill hours. Farmers may be able to supplement natural chill hours with Dormex and get a good crop. Krewer and Kathryn Taylor, a UGA stone fruit horticulturist, will lead a meeting on Dormex applications at the Jan. 24 business meeting of the National Peach Convention in Myrtle Beach, S.C. Call Bob McCurry of the South Carolina Peach Council at (803) 734-2215 for more information about that meeting. Farmers in upper north Georgia have been more fortunate. They’re on track to get enough chilling hours for rabbiteye blueberries and most peach types grown in their area.last_img read more


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Water Detective.

first_img A Timeline of WaterProtection Legislation Walk along the banks of the Savannah River. Fish the Chattahoochee. Swim in the Flint. Chances are you’ll see a sign warning of the potential risk due to pollution. Pollution threatens the quality of water and the health of people all over the state. But often, it’s not easy to determine exactly where that pollution is coming from.Feces in water typically comes from leaking septic tanks, agricultural runoff or animal droppings. If water contains feces, it could also contain disease-producing bacteria or viruses that can exist in the feces. These diseases include typhoid fever and hepatitis A.The maximum amount of pollution a body of water can have without violating state water-quality standards is called the Total Maximum Daily Load. Fecal pollution is a major contributor to TMDLs for Georgia watersheds.Most fecal pollution comes from nonpoint sources. So far, there has been no proven way to know where or from what animal it came. And if you can’t locate the problem, you can’t fix it.Water Detective “This is cutting-edge science,” said UGA CAES water quality coordinator Bill Segars. “The possibilities for using (this) method to identify nonpoint pollution sources could revolutionize water management around the world. This ribotyping data collection is a sound, scientifically based tool.”Other states are also using ribotyping to better understand pollution, said Alan Hallum, chief of the water protection branch of the Georgia Environmental Protection Division. But Georgia could lead the way.If there is a public health problem in a watershed, Hallum said, this test could better target what needs to be done in the watershed to correct the problem as quickly and as economically as possible.”I would like to have, from a state regulatory standpoint, a way to know we’re not spending money unnecessarily,” Hallum said. “This (test) allows the stakeholders in a watershed to do a best-management approach to fixing a problem.” But new research may help regulatory agencies pinpoint sources of fecal pollution and clean up one of Georgia’s most valuable resources.Peter Hartel is an associate professor of crop and soil science in the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. For the past two years, he’s been an environmental detective.Hartel uses a type of DNA fingerprinting that can tell what animal caused the fecal pollution of a specific watershed.Using a process called ribotyping, Hartel can make a DNA fingerprint, a series of distinct bands, of the Escherichia coli. This bacterium is found in all warm-blooded animal feces.A few years ago, scientists believed E. coli was the same in all animals. But it’s not. Different animals have different types.”Dog E. coli is found only in dogs. Human E. coli is found only in humans. The same with cows and poultry,” Hartel said. “We’re not sure why that is right now. But we know they’re different.”After you have a library of the distinct E. coli fingerprints of various animals, the rest, in theory, is easy, Hartel said.You can monitor and take samples of a watershed, isolate the different E. coli found in the water and compare that to the library of animal samples. That will tell you what animal feces are in the water, Hartel said.Building the LibraryWhen Hartel began his research, there was little information on ribotyping to identify pollution sources in water. He’s changing that.So far, his E. coli fingerprint library has samples from several Georgia animals, including beef cattle, swine, poultry and Canada geese. But he needs more.”There has to be an established library to compare and identify samples against,” Hartel said. “The more extensive the source library, the greater the likelihood of obtaining matches.”center_img Peter Hartel, UGA CAES researcher, works to build a DNA library that will identify points of pollution in Georgia watersheds. Photo:Robert Newcomblast_img read more


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Holiday plants

first_imgBy Bodie V. PennisiUniversity of GeorgiaAs you decorate your home for the holidays, consider thesecolorful complements to the traditional poinsettias andevergreens.Christmas Cactus. This old-timefavorite gets its name from dependable holiday flowering.Actually, three related species look like Christmas cacti. Thethree types bloom faithfully at different times of the year:Thanksgiving, Christmas and Easter.They’ve been extensively hybridized to produce a wide range offlower colors: magenta, white, pink, salmon and orange.All holiday cacti need bright light and moderate moisture forbest growth and flowering. A south window is perfect. After thesix-week holiday blooming, remove spent flowers and apply ahouseplant fertilizer.Christmas Pepper. Thesegarden-pepper cultivars are selected for their fruit color andform. The peppers can be globe- or cone-shaped and yellow,orange, red, green or purple, with peak color for one to twomonths.The fruits will be brighter and last longer if you provide highlight and mild temperatures (60-75 degrees) and keep the soilmoist.Fertilize weekly with a soluble fertilizer. Be aware that thesepeppers are sometimes extremely hot. Keep them away from smallchildren.Gloxinia. Look for single orclustered, trumpet-shaped, red, violet-blue, pink, white orbicolored flowers. A 6-inch gloxinia will have a dozen or morebuds and will flower three to four weeks if properly cared for.The blooms last four to six days.Treat gloxinias as African violets: Avoid direct sunlight. Waterfrom the saucer with warm water (at least 70 degrees). Keep thesoil moist but not waterlogged. Avoid cold or hot drafts.Unlike African violets, gloxinias need to rest beforereflowering. When the leaves start to die back, water it lessoften. Allow the tuberous stem to rest two to four months in drysoil. Resume watering when new growth appears.Begonia. The Rieger (or hiemalis)begonia looks much like the garden tuberous and ‘nonstop’begonia. The leaves are somewhat glossy and can break easily.Both single and double flowers may be found on the same plant.Riegers are relatively tolerant of sun exposure and temperature.They prefer a slightly moist soil. A high-quality plant will beat least half-covered by flowers.Kalanchoe. A succulent plant withfleshy leaves, kalanchoe bears striking, bright clusters ofyellow, orange or red, long-lasting flowers. New multicoloredselections are available, too.This plant will be happy when warm and dry. However, droughtstress will shorten flower life. Feeding with houseplantfertilizer once a month helps. The plant will rebloom if youplace it in artificially short days for six to eight weeks.Amaryllis. A great spring bulb inthe garden, Amaryllis produces spectacular orange, red, white,pink and multicolored blooms. In pots, plants are generallyavailable from Christmas to Easter. They flower four to six weeksafter bulbs are planted.Individual blooms may last three to four days. To reflower, placethe plant in bright light (outdoors when temperatures permit).Let the foliage fully develop. Fertilize and water it all summer.In late summer or fall, as the leaves begin to die back, waterless often. When the leaves die, allow the soil to dry out. Placethe bulb in a cool, dry place four to eight weeks before resumingwatering.Cyclamen. These beauties show up instores from October through March. Attractive foliage and avariety of white, pink, lavender, purple, red or bicolor bloomsmake cyclamens excellent gift plants. They can flower for two tofour months with proper care.Cyclamens like cool indoor temperatures (50-60 degrees), so placethem on an east or north window. Take care when watering, asplants are easily damaged from over- or underwatering.After flowering has stopped, gradually water them less often.After the leaves die, allow the tuberous stem to remain dry sixweeks before rewatering.New foliage will appear after watering resumes. Bright light andcool temperatures, too, may sometimes produce a plant that willreflower.(Bodie Pennisi is an Extension Service horticulturist with theUniversity of Georgia College of Agricultural and EnvironmentalSciences.)last_img read more


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Bioenergy booming

first_imgBioenergy scientists, policymakers, industry leaders and enthusiasts met in Tifton, Ga., Aug. 3-5 to discuss how Georgia and surrounding states could soon establish and grow a vibrant renewable energy market to help the world find alternative ways to power itself.High gas prices spur forward thinkingThe three-day 2010 Southeast Bioenergy Conference was held at the University of Georgia Tifton Campus Conference Center. Keynote speaker Christopher Steiner told more than 500 participants that costly gas isn’t necessarily a bad thing. It could be the catalyst to spark a sincere, long-term U.S. energy strategy to break its addiction to foreign oil.Right now, there are 1 billion people living “America-style” lives, or lives demanding high energy needs, he said. By 2040, that number will be 3 billion. “That’s three times as many people demanding the kind of energy, the kind of stuff, the kind of lives we have and standing with us at the world’s energy spigot,” said Steiner, a Forbes staff writer and author of the recently published “$20 per gallon.”$6 per gallon gasoline?Higher gas prices will hopefully come gradually, he said, to allow U.S. gas consumers to adapt or change transportation habits. Several years ago when prices hit $2 per gallon, not much changed; and $3-per-gallon gas a few years later did little to change consumption. But in 2008, when prices topped $4 per gallon, things changed. That year, Americans drove 100 billion fewer miles than in 2007. “It’s very clear to me that the changes gas price bring to us is as much a study in sociology as they are in economics,” said Steiner, who predicts gas prices could reach $6 per gallon in the next five years.Some oil used by Americans comes from anti-American countries The U.S. uses 25 percent of the world’s oil supply, importing 60 percent from unstable countries or ones that publicly speak against American policies or actions, said U.S. Rep. Jack Kingston (R-Ga.).“Our scramble for alternative fuels is as much a matter of national security as it is anything about economics or the environment,” he said. “And I believe that innovation, conservation and exploration, just like you do, have to be part of it.”Governor says Georgia prime spot for bioenergy cropsThe state’s “sun, soil and water” provide for fertile grounds for mass bioenergy production, Gov. Sonny Perdue said during the conference luncheon. He added that major energy companies in the U.S. and around the world are now looking to do potential business in the state.“The good news is we’re in a good spot. We have everything it takes: natural resources, intellectual capital and an entrepreneurial spirit,” he said. “…We have watched the birthing and nurturing and potty training of a whole new industry in Georgia.”Lectures and breakout sessions at the conference included “Your Next Job Could be in Clean Energy Technology,” “Wood Pellets – The Southeast’s Hottest Export,” “Promising Energy Crops for the Southeast,” “New Developments in Bioenergy Products & Processes” and “Ag Energy in Action – Success Stories from the Southeast.”More information on the conference can be found at www.sebioenergy.org.last_img read more


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Student recruitment

first_imgUniversity of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences’ students train for careers in food, plant or animal industries, and they get to work directly with the world-renowned scientists who teach them.The college will showcase its academic programs at its annual Southwest District Recruitment Event Sept. 23 at the UGA Tifton Campus Conference Center in Tifton, Ga. It starts at 5 p.m.“These prospective students are here to learn about the next big step in their lives, where they will attend college and what they will study,” said Joe West, the UGA Tifton assistant dean. “So it is exciting to witness their enthusiasm and to know that in this group of young people there will be future business owners, educators, scientists, and the future leaders for our state and country.” When compared to graduates from other UGA colleges, West said, fewer CAES students are still seeking employment six months after graduation, and their starting salaries are the second highest among UGA graduates. Representatives from all 10 CAES departments will be on hand to answer questions from prospective students and their parents. Topics will include admissions, financial aid and information about the college and its different majors and campuses.Students and parents just need to bring an open mind and a lot of questions, said Erin Womack, the UGA Tifton academic program coordinator.CAES students can expect small class sizes, one-on-one faculty advising and exposure to world-renowned research starting at the undergraduate level. They can’t get all of this from any other school, Womack said.“We want the students who come to the event to visit with our scientists in attendance and learn about the many opportunities available to them in the field of agriculture, to meet some of the scientists who will be their teachers and to gain a better understanding of how an education from the UGA CAES will prepare them for exciting opportunities in the field of agriculture and related industries” West said.Dinner and door prizes will be provided. To sign up, high school sophomores, juniors or seniors should contact their UGA Extension county offices. Or, they can call (229) 386-3414 or email scromer@uga.edu. Transfer students should contact Brice Nelson at(706) 542-1611 or bricen@uga.edu.last_img read more


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Halloween treats

first_imgHalloween is a time of costumes, merriment and good fright. It can also cause anxieties. Children think of candy, candy, candy. Parents think of stranger danger, allergic reactions and upset stomachs.According to Judy Harrison, a University of Georgia Cooperative Extension foods specialist, Halloween presents three major hazards: food allergens, choking hazards and product tampering.“For a child with food allergies, Halloween can be life-threatening,” she said. “Parents need to be sure to examine the labels of candy before the child eats the treats.” Choking, in particular for young children, is another danger. Hard candy is the obvious choking hazard, but Harrison warns that parents need to be wary of gum, peanuts, popcorn and small toys, too. Parents should remove items that can be choking hazards from their children’s Halloween bags.Product tampering looms in parents’ minds on Halloween. They need to be on the lookout for anything that looks suspicious and check that the packaging is not open, torn or tampered with in any way.Parents should examine packages for signs of exposure to moisture, too, which can lead to contamination. “Although these food-safety risks are rare, they do occur. Parents need to be aware of them,” she said.Along with food safety, nutrition is a major concern for parents on Halloween due to the large consumption of sugar-filled delights.“Candy is never as nutritious as other foods, but some is OK as long as it is eaten in reasonable amounts,” said Connie Crawley, a UGA Extension nutrition and health specialist. “Parents can offer one to two small pieces per day over a few days, and then the rest can disappear.”Children often tell their parents that Halloween lasts only one day, so they should be allowed to eat whatever they want on that day. “The problem is that rarely is it one day, and it just begins a whole season of overeating if we are not careful,” Crawley said.Crawley has several ideas for healthier Halloween party treats. Homemade pumpkin muffins, popcorn, apples, vegetables with low-calorie dips and sandwiches cut into shapes of pumpkins or bats are all nutritious alternatives.For children with diabetes, Halloween is an especially difficult day in terms of nutrition.“Many children with diabetes can eat small amounts of candy if they take multiple insulin injections or if they are on an insulin pump,” Crawley said. “Some parents just substitute the carbs from other foods in the meal plan or add more insulin. The problem is this can result in excess weight gain if it is done too often.”She also added that “if it is done moderately and with good sense, Halloween is not much risk at all” to children with diabetes.According to Crawley, children with Type 2 diabetes may need to be more careful than children with Type 1 because “many of them are not on insulin, so they cannot cover the extra carbohydrates as easily. They definitely have to eat small amounts and substitute for other carbs in their diet.”Both Crawley and Harrison believe that adult supervision is the key to avoiding threats on Halloween, which can be a safe and exciting day for children.last_img read more