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First Defense Weather: Cooler Weekend Ahead

first_imgJAMESTOWN – A hot and steamy week ended with strong storms on Friday, the weekend will be mostly quiet and much cooler. Temperatures will struggle to reach 70. A secondary cold front will pass by the region today. Temperatures for your Saturday will be much cooler as they will only hover in the low to mid 60’s across the region. Otherwise it will be mostly cloudy with a few scattered rain showers.Tonight will be cloudy and it will turn much cooler, with lows dropping back into the lower 40’s.Sunday the clouds will scatter out, leaving for a mainly sunny day. Temperatures will barely make it out of the upper 50’s. A far cry from the upper 80’s we saw a few days ago. As we begin off a new week, Monday starts off sunny with temperatures in the 60’s. As the week continues on temperatures will slowly begin to warm up with chances for rain by mid week.WNYNewsNow is a proud Ambassador for the NOAA Weather-Ready Nation program.Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Blythe Danner’s Broadway Return & Three World Premieres Set for MTC

first_img MTC’s Stage I will also be home to the world premiere of Frances Ya-Chu Cowhig’s The World of Extreme Happiness. Directed by Eric Ting, this play follows Sunny, a woman determined to escape her life in rural China and forge a new identity in the city. The play will begin performances on February 3, 2015 and open on February 24. Auburn’s new play Lost Lake, also directed by Sullivan, will play New York City Center – Stage I. The piece takes place at a lakeside rental that is a far cry from the idyllic getaway Veronica and her children so desperately need. No casting has been announced for the production, which begins on October 21 and opens on November 11. Tony winner Blythe Danner and world premiere works from Pulitzer Prize-winning playwrights Donald Margulies and David Auburn are set for Manhattan Theatre Club’s 2014-2015 season. Danner, who won a Tony Award for her Broadway debut in Butterflies Are Free in 1970 and most recently appeared on stage in MTC’s The Commons of Pensacola will headline Margulies’ The Country House. Danner stars as Anna Patterson, the matriarch of a brood of famous and longing-to-be-famous creative artists who have gathered at their Berkshires summerhouse during the Williamstown Theatre Festival. This should not be a stretch for Danner, who has her own real-life brood of famous artists (Hi, Gwyneth!) and has spent many summers on stage at Williamstown. Directed by Daniel Sullivan, The Country House begins Broadway performances at MTC’s Samuel J. Friedman Theatre on September 9 and opens on October 2. View Commentslast_img read more


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Doyle honored

first_imgUniversity of Georgia Regents Professor of Food Microbiology Michael P. Doyle has been awarded the 2013 Christopher Columbus Fellowship Foundation Agriscience Award.Doyle was presented the $10,000 CCFF Distinguished Agriscience Scientist Award at a ceremony held in Washington, D.C., on July 8. The federal government and the American Farm Bureau Federation support the foundation.Doyle came to the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences in 1993 to establish the Center for Food Safety in Griffin, Ga. As director of the center, he has developed a research program that promotes collaboration among the food industry, the university, and federal and state agencies. His research focuses on developing methods to detect and control foodborne bacterial pathogens at all levels — from the farm to the table. He is internationally known as a leading authority on foodborne pathogens, especially E. coli O157:H7.In the early 1980s, Doyle was the first food microbiologist to study E. coli O157:H7, the major cause of hemolytic uremic syndrome in children in the U.S.He has received several awards for his research accomplishments, including the Nicholas Appert Award of the Institute of Food Technologists, the Public Health Honor Award of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the Scientific Achievement Award of the American Meat Institute Foundation. Doyle serves on food safety committees of many scientific organizations and has advised groups like the World Health Organization, the Institute of Medicine, the National Academy of Science-National Research Council, the International Life Sciences Institute-North America, the Food and Drug Administration, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the U.S. Department of Defense, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.The foundation also presented awards to a high school teacher and two high school students. Sara Clark of Sonoraville High School in Calhoun, Ga., received the foundation’s $5,000 Agriscience Educator Award. Two high school students, Jillian Drake of Fallbrook, Cali., and Kellie Einck of Paullina, Iowa, each received $1,000 awards for individual research projects.”Today we honor four outstanding individuals who are involved in a wide range of agricultural pursuits,” said Maria Lombardo, chair of the foundation. “From a leader in researching food safety and security, to a high school educator who inspires her students to pursue agricultural studies, to two high school students who are conducting groundbreaking research, this year’s Agriscience Awards recipients are truly remarkable.”The award competition was open to scientists, high school educators and high school students around the country who excel in the field of agriscience.last_img read more


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Vermont ‘Plus 5’ Contractors Offer Free Six-Year Warranty

first_imgIBEW LOCAL 300 ‘PLUS 5’ CONTRACTORS OFFER FREE SIX-YEAR WARRANTYSouth Burlington, Vt. – (Jan. 28, 2008) – International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers Local 300 contractors are reminding customers about their best-in-class Plus 5 Electrical Protection Plan.Unique to the IBEW, Plus 5 is a complimentary extended maintenance agreement on materials and workmanship that services the wiring in a new or remodeled home for an additional five years beyond a builder’s standard one-year warranty. The plan adds nothing to construction costs and involves no administrative or legal procedures on the part of the consumer. In the event that a problem arises during the coverage term, a certified Plus 5 contractor will immediately fix the issue at no cost to the homeowner, builder or developer.”When utilizing a Plus 5 professional, the job is being done by the finest craftsmen in the business. The customer need not fear a hefty bill to pay if there is a suspected malfunction down the road, as all electrical work is completely covered by warranty,” said Local 300 Business Manager George Clain. “This is an unbeatable value, whether you are a residential contractor, a recently married couple building your first home or a real estate developer planning a condominium complex.”Several Local 300 contractors offer the Plus 5 Protection Plan, including American Electric (802-763-8179), B&H Electric (802-888-4101), Brown Electric (802-863-2060), Century Electric (802-233-2849), JS Electric (802-363-3353), Metruk’s Electrical Contracting (802-899-1103), Peck Electric (802-658-3378) and Sherwin Electric (802-878-4041). All are fully licensed, insured and trained, provide free estimates and continually keep abreast of new technologies and materials within the industry.For more information about Plus 5, visit www.plus5.org(link is external).ABOUT THE IBEW LOCAL 300Based in South Burlington, the IBEW Local 300 serves 1,200-plus laborers throughout Vermont. The organization is part of the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers (IBEW), which is headquartered in Washington, D.C., and represents approximately 750,000 members who work in a wide variety of fields, including utilities, construction, telecommunications, broadcasting, manufacturing, railroads and government. The IBEW has members in both the United States and Canada and stands out among the American unions in the AFL-CIO because of its size and highly skilled constituency.For more information, contact Marketing and Business Development Director Matt Lash at (802) 864-5864, MLash@ibewlocal300.org(link sends e-mail) or www.ibewlocal300.org(link is external).last_img read more


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East Northport Woman, 93, Killed in House Fire

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A 93-year-old East Northport woman was killed in a house fire Thursday night despite two local fire chiefs’ rescue efforts. Suffolk County police said the blaze at 55 Grover Lane, which is under investigation but doesn’t appear to be suspicious, was called in around 9:25 p.m. The first two East Northport firefighters to respond—First Assistant Chief Daniel Heffernan, who lives nearby and arrived within two minutes, and Chief Joseph Ervin—entered the home while it was still on fire and filled with smoke. The pair discovered the victim, identified as Alice Woods, near the doorway of her second floor bedroom. Woods, the lone resident, was pronounced dead by the Suffolk County Medical Examiner’s office, police said.Investigators believe the fire began in Wood’s bedroom, police said, adding that the blaze does not appear to be criminal.last_img read more


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Cops: Man Offered to Give Hempstead Student a Ride, Exposed Himself

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Nassau County police are looking for a man who tried to lure a 13-year-old girl into his car in the vicinity of a Hempstead middle school Wednesday afternoon and then exposed himself, prompting the girl to run away, police said. Police said a Hispanic man was sitting in a parked white Chevy sedan near Lawrence Road Middle School when he asked the teen if she wanted a ride home and then exposed himself, police said. The teen ran back to her school and reported the incident, police said. The man fled in an unknown direction, police said. The incident occurred on the first day of school for students in Hempstead Union Free School District. When asked if similar incidents have been reported, a police spokesman said “they do not know that as of yet.” The school district’s superintendent, Susan Johnson, was not available to comment.last_img read more


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PROMISING PRACTICES FOR PANDEMIC PLANNING Kentucky’s grassroots network helps at-risk populations prepare

first_imgEditor’s Note: CIDRAP’s Promising Practices: Pandemic Influenza Preparedness Tools (www.pandemicpractices.org) online database showcases peer-reviewed practices, including useful tools to help others with their planning. This article is one of a biweekly series exploring the development of these practices. We hope that describing the process and context of these practices enhances pandemic planning.Jan 30, 2008 (CIDRAP News) – A statewide project in Kentucky engages communities to help vulnerable populations prepare for an emergency.This grassroots group, called the Kentucky Outreach and Information Network (KOIN), was initiated by the Kentucky Cabinet for Health and Family Services. It brings together representatives from diverse community groups, faith-based organizations, health and social service agencies, and the media. Creating this network helps state health officials reach vulnerable populations with preparedness information; it also allows groups working with those populations to find and hone pertinent information.Barbara Fox, KOIN coordinator and the information officer for Health and Family Services, said the network, which began in 2004, now has about 400 members serving “hard to reach” populations, including the deaf, blind, the elderly, the disabled, and those who speak limited or no English. (Kentucky is home to large Spanish- and Vietnamese-speaking populations.) KOIN planners also hope to reach out to homeless populations this year, Fox said.An additional focus is on rural populations, as a substantial portion of Kentucky’s 4.2 million residents live in rural areas. Knowing how to reach them when needed is essential, Fox said.As the statewide KOIN project continues to grow, Fox said she hopes such networks also can be developed at the local health department level.Workshops for educating, getting feedbackFox holds annual workshops with KOIN members that have a twofold purpose: to raise awareness about disaster preparedness and to hear ideas on how best to reach different audiences. The network members are considered trusted local sources who can convey messages appropriately.These sources include pastors and leaders of different faith groups, chaplains who visit local horse farms where there are many immigrant workers, and caseworkers from social service organizations that serve specific language or special needs groups. Other members, according to Fox, include ethnic media reporters, local radio hosts with programs that cater to particular populations, translators, healthcare workers, and others who provide direct services or have otherwise developed trusting relationships with the target populations.”These are folks who really know their communities,” Fox said. “It’s kind of hard here at the state level to know what’s going on.” Ensuring crisis communication is particularly important for people who do not receive information through conventional channels.A 2005 study in Kentucky on reaching vulnerable populations during emergencies found that during a crisis locally trusted sources gain more trust compared with outside sources (see link below). That finding underscores the importance of identifying and training such sources to dispatch information during a disaster.The study also found that few of the vulnerable populations explored “felt adequately prepared for grave crisis, whether terrorism-related or the result of disease or natural disaster,” according to the study’s authors. KOIN provides an opportunity to improve that preparation.Fox brings drafts of materials to workshops to solicit feedback from the network members and then incorporates changes, she said. “They point out a lot of things that we missed.”Network members are expected to share those materials with their constituencies, Fox said. She provides members with items such as community and media information guides, brochures, magnets, and coloring books.”They adapt the information to meet the specific needs of their populations,” Fox said.Ever-evolving messagesFox mainly communicates with contacts via a periodic newsletter, although in an emergency, e-mail and telephone calls will be used. She tries not to overwhelm members with too much information or responsibilities, she added.”It’s a volunteer network, so we can’t demand things of these people,” Fox said.The network has already been tested on a few occasions. Recently, it was used to alert people about a Salmonella outbreak caused by peanut butter. It was also employed in bringing different people together for Kentucky’s Pandemic Influenza Summit in 2006.The KOIN project keeps exploring new ways to communicate emerging concerns such as pandemic influenza with special populations, Fox said. A new set of messages on preparedness is under development now.”We’re going to start testing the messages with seasonal flu,” she said, adding that some of the approaches will be tested among different faith congregations, whose members have been useful in evaluating messages.Language, other barriersBut challenges remain. For example, poor rural communities are of particular concern, Fox said, and communication in these areas may require unconventional methods. She said one of KOIN’s member organizations, for instance, is able to reach people on horseback if needed. Health departments and individuals in these areas also have satellite phones in case standard systems break down.In addition, communications to different audiences pose a number of challenges. For example, Fox said, “It’s really hard to get materials into Braille.”Fox is also working on pictograms that teach people how to proceed through a flu clinic, which could be especially beneficial for populations with low literacy rates. “We’re testing that out right now with our KOIN people, and they’ve been giving us a lot of pointers,” she added.In addition, the state’s Vietnamese community would benefit greatly from having more materials translated. The 2000 census identified about 3,000 Vietnamese residents in Kentucky. Today that figure is closer to 7,000, said Thuy-Loan Nguyen, who works with the Louisville branch of Boat People SOS, a social services organization for Vietnamese immigrants.Nguyen has been a KOIN member for 2 years. She said barriers such as poor English abilities, lack of transportation, and being poorly informed hinder preparedness in the Vietnamese community. “I don’t think they are well-prepared,” she said.Boat People SOS has been sharing KOIN updates with eight local Vietnamese organizations, Nguyen said. More education and resources would be beneficial, a point she has raised at KOIN workshops. “We lack information in Vietnamese,” Nguyen said. “We really need help.”One case studyWorking with KOIN has helped the Christian Appalachian Project (CAP) plan disaster outreach and network with other organizations, according to Sherry Buresh, the organization’s disaster relief program director. CAP offers more than 60 programs to different vulnerable populations, including the elderly, the disabled, and the poor in Kentucky, West Virginia, and Ohio.CAP has plans to use a pool of staff and local volunteers to call, e-mail, or go door-to-door, especially in more remote areas, in an emergency. She noted that preparedness levels remain low among some residents, especially because rural and poor communities have other more pressing concerns.”I feel real comfortable . . .that we would reach a large number of people,” in an emergency, Buresh said. “[The KOIN project] is a very simple tool that could have a lot of impact.”See also:2005 study: “Reaching vulnerable populations in widespread emergencies: lessons learned in Kentucky”http://www.cidrap.umn.edu/sites/default/files/public/php/70/70_lessons_learned_0.pdflast_img read more


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Where to buy a home for under $500,000 just 1km from the CBD

first_imgCoreLogic data has found you can buy a unit for under $500,000 within 1km of Brisbane’s CBD. Image: AAP/Claudia Baxter.FORGET settling for a home miles away in suburbia.If the bright lights of inner-city living are more your style, you can still pick up a unit for under $500,000 in the heart of Brisbane.New data from CoreLogic has revealed five suburbs with median unit values of less than $500,000 within less than 1km of the Brisbane CBD — that’s right, just 1km. GET THE LATEST REAL ESTATE NEWS DIRECT TO YOUR INBOX HERE This one bedroom unit at 2707/79 Albert St, Brisbane City, is available for offers over $325,000.Compare that to Sydney where you have to travel more than 12km from the CBD to find something similar.More from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus18 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market18 hours agoCoreLogic analyst Cameron Kusher said housing options under $500,000 were available much closer to the CBD for units compared with houses in most capital cities. “This likely also goes some way to explaining why in Sydney and Melbourne, where house values are falling, the more affordable unit market is holding up better,” he said. FROM RECEPTIONIST TO $2M INCOME This one bedroom unit at 801/8 Church St, Fortitude Valley, is for sale for $330,000.CoreLogic figures reveal there were 185 unit sales in Spring Hill in the past year, with a median sale price of $405,351 — that means half of those properties sold for below the median and half for above that price.In South Brisbane, 290 units sold in the past 12 months at a median sale price of $467,662, while in neighbouring Kangaroo Point, 284 units were sold in the past year.center_img This apartment at 32/15 Goodwin St, Kangaroo Point, is on the market for offers over $419,000.Mr Kusher said most suburbs in Greater Brisbane had a median unit value below $500,000. “Even within the CBD and surrounds median unit values generally sit below $500,000 offering a much more affordable alternative, particularly in the inner city to houses,” he said.Brisbane CBD has a median unit value of $473,101.The other four cheap suburbs to buy units close to the city centre are Spring Hill, 0.6km, South Brisbane, 0.7km, Kangaroo Point, 0.8km and Fortitude Valley, 0.8km. HOW FAR FROM THE CBD CAN YOU BUY A HOUSE FOR UNDER $500,000? last_img read more


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Mermaid Beach is bucking the Gold Coast property market’s downward trend

first_imgMORE NEWS: What makes this house so popular? Median house price: $1.35 millionChange in median price (three months): down 7.5 per centChange in median price (12 months): down 12.6 per centChange in median price (three years): up 10.2 per centChange in median price (five years): up 58.8 per cent Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayNext playlist itemMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 1:58Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -1:58 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedQuality Levels720p720pHD576p576p360p360p216p216pAutoA, selectedAudio Tracken (Main), selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.This is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreenWhy location is everything in real estate01:59 The property at 37 Seagull Ave, Mermaid Beach sold for $1.5 million in January – $200,000 more than when it sold almost three years ago. Mermaid Beach’s median house price may have dropped over the past year but there have been a number of solid sales in the suburb recently.THE heat in the Gold Coast property market has sizzled out in recent months, but one of the city’s most popular suburbs is bucking the trend.Latest CoreLogic data shows the median house price in Mermaid Beach dropped 12.6 per cent to $1.35 million in the year to December – more than any other Coast suburb – but a number of recent sales prove it is not all doom and gloom.A 1960s built cottage at 60 Seagull Ave sold for $1.3 million last month – $13,500 more than when it last sold in July 2017. Another property on the same street at No. 37 sold for $200,000 more in January compared to March 2016 when it fetched $1.3 million.center_img MERMAID BEACH BY NUMBERS “Firstly, the council protected the three-storey height limits in the residential area, which has helped to keep the strong community feel, enhanced the lifestyle of the area and has encouraged property owners to upgrade their homes without the fear that a high-rise apartment will be built next door,” he said. “At the same time the council has allowed low-rise developments along the Gold Coast Highway, which has revitalised what was becoming a tired strip of shops.“The suburb has become a dining destination and it is home to some of the city’s best restaurants, cafes and bars.“Then you have the knowledge that the light rail is coming, which is also adding to the desire to live in the area.”Ray White Broadbeach agent Daniel Donovan said sales in the suburb had picked up recently following a slow end to last year.“Towards the back end of last year, the beachside market definitely slowed down,” he said. “There were a few properties that took a hit.“Coming into January, there’s been a whole new pool of buyers. I reckon Mermaid always seems to dodge the rest of the market place.”– With Mikaela Day The owners only made few changes to the property before they sold it.A few streets north, an old house at 38 Surf St was snapped up for $1.75 million last month less than three years after selling for $1.55 million.REIQ Gold Coast zone chair Andrew Henderson said the suburb’s median house price often fluctuated.“Fluctuations come down to the amount of sales that occur on Hedges Ave or Albatross Ave,” he said. “They are such big-ticket items, and if you get three or four sales on the beach in a quarter versus no sales it will have a big impact.” Mr Henderson said the area had a mixed bag of properties available ranging from shacks to mansions.“The older shacks at the moment are very strong in the market. “The last six months especially, buyers are securing land now to build a house on in the future. People build to live in them permanently so there’s not a lot of those that have changed hands which, again, will all impact on the median price.” More from news02:37International architect Desmond Brooks selling luxury beach villa12 hours ago02:37Gold Coast property: Sovereign Islands mega mansion hits market with $16m price tag2 days agoProfessionals John Henderson Real Estate director Luke Henderson said demand for properties in the suburb had kept prices strong.He said there were several factors that made it a standout performer in recent years.MORE NEWS: Mansion with million-dollar views sellslast_img read more


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How round-the-clock drinking did increase binge culture after all (UK)

first_imgThe Telegraph 3 May 2016Family First Comment: NZ politicians and the Law Commission also thought things would improve with a ‘continental’ approach to alcohol laws. As we now know, they were also wrong.The relaxation of licensing hours intended to cut binge drinking in Britain by ushering in a more “continental” approach actually lead to an increase in heavy alcohol consumption, the first study of its kind has shown.Analysis of official health data by economists found that while average drinking volumes rose only marginally following the extension of opening hours a decade ago, the chances of some people drinking heavily increased dramatically.The likelihood of drinkers downing almost six pints in a single night surged by 36 per cent after the abolition of the traditional 11pm drinking-up time, the paper presented to the Royal Economic Society found.And the chances of someone consuming more than 16 units in a night – the equivalent of a bottle and a half of wine – jumped by 29 per cent in the wake of the reforms.The researchers, from Lancaster University, said the findings could also be linked to worsening physical and mental health for some drinkers.The study draws on data charting the nation’s drinking habits in 2003 and 2009, directly before and after the licensing changes came into force in late 2005.READ MORE: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2016/05/03/how-round-the-clock-drinking-did-increase-binge-culture-after-al/last_img read more