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Jerzy Dudek reveals ‘furious’ phone call from Arsene Wenger after Liverpool transfer move

first_imgA furious Arsene Wenger phoned Jerzy Dudek after the goalkeeper joined Liverpool (Picture: Getty)Jerzy Dudek has lifted the lid on a ‘furious’ phone call he received from Arsene Wenger after he joined Liverpool instead of Arsenal almost two decades ago.The goalkeeper was desperate for a new challenge after spending five years in the Netherlands with Feyenoord and both Premier League clubs made their interest known in the summer of 2001. Wenger, looking to provide competition for an ageing David Seaman, invited Dudek for a tour of Highbury and Arsenal’s training ground before making a £7.5million offer for the shot-stopper. The Pole met Wenger before completing a move to Arsenal’s rivals (Picture: Getty)‘I went back to Rotterdam, then Wenger phoned me. “I’m really sorry,” he said. “Feyenoord want £10m and we don’t pay that amount of money, not even for a striker”. The deal was off, and I was angry.‘Then three matches into the new season, Liverpool came in and I moved to Anfield – for £5.75m. “What the hell is going on?” Wenger asked me when he called. “I offered £7.5m and Feyenoord said no!” I said, “I’m sorry – I had nothing to do with it”. ‘Joining Liverpool was meant to be.’More: Arsenal FCArsenal flop Denis Suarez delivers verdict on Thomas Partey and Lucas Torreira movesThomas Partey debut? Ian Wright picks his Arsenal starting XI vs Manchester CityArsene Wenger explains why Mikel Arteta is ‘lucky’ to be managing ArsenalDudek would go on to cement his place in the hearts of Liverpool fans with an outrageous double save to deny Andriy Shevchenko at the end of extra-time in the side’s Champions League final victory over AC Milan in 2005.His iconic ‘spaghetti legs’ tactic – inspired by Bruce Grobbelaar – in the resulting penalty shootout, in which he denied Shevchenko and Andrea Pirlo’s spot-kicks, has also gone down in Liverpool folklore. The Pole also won an FA Cup, a League Cup and a Community Shield during his six years on Merseyside before joining Real Madrid in 2007.Follow Metro Sport across our social channels, on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. For more stories like this, check our sport page.MORE: Jose Enrique tells Kylian Mbappe to join Liverpool to make winning look ‘even easier’MORE: Rob Holding responds to rumours Arsenal could sell him this summer Metro Sport ReporterWednesday 27 May 2020 2:30 pmShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link1.4kShares Advertisement Advertisementcenter_img Comment Jerzy Dudek reveals ‘furious’ phone call from Arsene Wenger after Liverpool transfer move Dudek is best remembered for his magnificent performance in Liverpool’s Champions League triumph (Picture: Getty)But Dudek ended up completing a move to Merseyside for an even smaller fee later that summer and an enraged Wenger responded by giving the Poland international a piece of his mind. AdvertisementAdvertisementADVERTISEMENT‘Arsene Wenger called me, and he was furious,’ Dudek told Liverpool Echo. ‘He was nearly yelling. I’d joined Liverpool, not Arsenal. After five years with Feyenoord, I was ready for a fresh challenge. ‘That summer, I’d spent a couple of days in London and Wenger showed me Highbury and the training ground. It was a beautiful visit – we agreed terms and shook hands. last_img read more

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AMS Trenchless Specialists Scores Hornsea Two Onshore Gig

first_imgØrsted has contracted AMS Trenchless Specialists to conduct part of the onshore cable works for the Hornsea Project Two offshore wind farm in the UK.AMS Trenchless Specialists will conduct Horizontal Directional Drilling (HDD) at the landfall site in Horseshoe Point where the offshore cables meet the onshore cables under the more than GBP 1 million worth contract.Using HDD means that the cable can be buried underground without using trenches or disrupting the existing sea defenses in the intertidal area that links the offshore and onshore infrastructure, Ørsted said.According to the Danish company, the works are expected to start in May and continue until September.“We’re delighted to welcome another UK firm to join us in building the UK’s largest renewable energy project currently under construction,” said Duncan Clark, Project Director for Hornsea One and Two.“Lancashire-based VolkerInfra are installing the onshore cable, the onshore substation is being built by Balfour Beatty, and the fact that AMS Trenchless Specialists, who are based literally up the road from our onshore site, will be working with us again is a testament to their previous work on Hornsea One.”The contract follows the companies’ previous cooperation on Hornsea Project One, where AMS No-Dig designed, supplied and installed cable ducts.“We feel proud to again have the opportunity to work on a project that will make a significant difference to the UK’s clean electricity system. HDD is a fast, efficient and environmentally friendly way to install this much needed infrastructure, whilst minimising disruption,” said George Aitkenhead, Managing Director at AMS Trenchless Specialists.The 1.4GW Hornsea Two is located 89km north-east of Grimsby and will comprise 165 Siemens Gamesa 8MW turbines. Once operational in 2022, it will become the largest wind farm in the world.last_img read more


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Execution to euthanasia: Liberal worm turns

first_imgNZ Herald 5 January 2018Family First Comment: Superb commentary from Dr Paul Moon… “One of the arguments in the 20th century that convinced many people of the error of executions was that occasionally, mistakes were made in judging someone guilty, and when it came to the death penalty, one mistake was one mistake too many. Recent overseas examples of people suffering from mental illness who have sought a termination of their lives (and been granted their wish by the medical profession), only to have a last-minute change of heart, shows that the risk of error when it comes to euthanasia is very real. Do we still hold to the view that one mistake is one too many? New Zealand finally dispensed with the death penalty because when knee-jerk emotional instincts were set aside, the moral, social, and ethical arguments against legal killings proved overwhelming. It will be a test to see if the country retains that perspective as the advocates of euthanasia push for what would amount to a reversal of this enlightened trajectory.”www.protect.org.nz – Make a submission today! Dr Paul Moon is Professor of History at Auckland University of Technology.Even as the noose was being placed around Walter Boulton’s neck on February 18, 1957, New Zealanders were growing increasingly uncomfortable with the notion of capital punishment. It was a sentiment no doubt strengthened by reports that instead of Boulton’s neck snapping immediately, he was left in agony while the rope slowly strangled him to death. In 1961, on the back of growing public opinion which saw the state sanction of killing as unenlightened, Parliament abolished the death penalty (except for the crime of treason, for which the option of execution remained until 1989, when this exemption was also removed).It is useful to reflect on the progress of death penalty abolitionists in New Zealand in the 20th century, and while it might be simplistic to transpose all their arguments to the current euthanasia debate, there are some significant themes that apply in both areas. During a 1941 parliamentary debate on the death penalty, the Attorney General and Minister of Justice, Rex Mason, described the state’s right to administer the death penalty as uncivilised and “backward”. Four years later, another Labour MP emphasised New Zealand’s reputation as a “progressive country” when arguing against capital punishment.As concerns over the morality of the state killing certain categories of its citizens mounted, abolitionists pointed out that the death penalty had detrimental psychological effects on those administering it. The testimony of some of those present at these killings highlighted the cold-bloodedness of the process, and the effects it left on them for life. One prison psychologist wrote of the feeling of “complete revulsion” at witnessing someone having their life terminated, despite the fact that the law had warranted it. Every execution needed an executioner, and those who took on that role also became victims in a way.Death penalty proponents, on the other hand, responded by suggesting that a life spent in prison could be worse than the death penalty, and that while people might oppose the state killing the worst of its criminals, it was sometimes a “practical” undertaking — a means of protecting society from the worst of its underbelly. However, by the 1950s, such “rational” arguments were increasingly crashing into the reality of society ending the lives of some of its members. The fact that prohibitions on public executions had long been in force was the giveaway clue that while the principle might have made sense, the practice of legally approved killings remained as abhorrent as ever.How the liberal worm has turned since. The same arguments used by progressives for the abolition of the death penalty in the 20th century have been misappropriated by those advocating for a new age of state-sanctioned killing — this time wrapped up in the euphemism of euthanasia, or the even more morbidly saccharine and utterly misleading “death with dignity”. In cases of euthanasia, it may be a doctor rather than a hangman carrying out the killing, but there is no reason to think the psychological effects on those involved in euthanasia will be any less severe, or that the fragile value we place on human life will not again be degraded. And the principle of the state giving permission for lives to be terminated on the basis of their being “worthy” and “unworthy” applies to both areas. The distinction is only that in capitalpunishment cases, death was the consequence of the state deeming that the life of a person (usually a murderer) was not worth continuing, while in euthanasia, it is the state backing the individual’s determination that their own life no longer has worth for physical or psychological reasons.One of the arguments in the 20th century that convinced many people of the error of executions was that occasionally, mistakes were made in judging someone guilty, and when it came to the death penalty, one mistake was one mistake too many. Recent overseas examples of people suffering from mental illness who have sought a termination of their lives (and been granted their wish by the medical profession), only to have a last-minute change of heart, shows that the risk of error when it comes to euthanasia is very real. Do we still hold to the view that one mistake is one too many? New Zealand finally dispensed with the death penalty because when knee-jerk emotional instincts were set aside, the moral, social, and ethical arguments against legal killings proved overwhelming. It will be a test to see if the country retains that perspective as the advocates of euthanasia push for what would amount to a reversal of this enlightened trajectory.last_img read more


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Lady Bulldogs VB’ers Split With Lady Cats

first_imgThe Batesville Lady Bulldogs defeated The Franklin County Lady Wildcats 25-11, 25-12, 25-20 in Varsity play.Batesville vs. FC Varsity BB (8-26)FC won The JV contest 25-15, 17-25, 15-7.Batesville vs. FC JV VB (8-26)Batesville will next battle East Central in St. Leon with the JV start at 5 PM.Courtesy of Bulldogs Coach Jody Thomas.last_img


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Increase in Gun Purchase Background Checks in

first_imgSTATEWIDE — Background checks for gun purchases are soaring in Indiana.The South Bend Tribune reports that for the first four months of 2016, more than 730,000 background checks were conducted.That’s more than twice the number that were conducted during the same time period last year.last_img


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Mr. Bobby Joe Peters

first_imgMr. Bobby Joe Peters, age 72, of Florence, Indiana, entered this life on January 14, 1945, in Aberdeen, Indiana, the son of the late, Dale and Ida Margaret (Riley) Peters. He was raised in Switzerland County, Indiana where he attended school. Bobby was united in marriage on July 24, 1967, at the Vevay United Methodist Church in Vevay, Indiana, to Linda Carol Peelman and to this union arrived a daughter, Cheryl and a son, Robert Wayne to bless their home. Bobby and Linda shared 49 years of marriage together until Linda passed away on September 17, 2016. Bobby was employed in maintenance for Dan’s Marina, retiring in 2006 after 12 years of service. He was a member of the Patriot Baptist Church in Patriot, Indiana. Bobby enjoyed painting, NASCAR, mowing his lawn, gardening and his roses. Bobby passed away at 7:47 am, Tuesday, March 7, 2017, at the Dearborn County Hospital in Lawrenceburg, Indiana.Bobby will be dearly missed by his son: Robert Wayne Peters of Hanover, IN; his son-in-law: Harold Wayne Cunningham of Florence, IN; his grandchildren: Dustin, Logan, Chelsey and Tesla; his step-granddaughter: Diana; his great-granddaughters: Chandale and Paige; his brothers: Larry Peters of Pleasant, IN and Dale Peters of Patriot, IN; his sisters: Patricia Brandon of Aurora, IN and Carolyn Morgan of Vevay, IN; his sister-in-law: Crystal Peters of Vevay, IN and his several nieces and nephews.He was preceded in death by his parents: Dale and Ida Margaret (Riley) Peters; his wife: Linda Carol (Peelman) Peters, died Sept. 17, 2016; his daughter: Cheryl Lynn Cunningham, died July 16, 2011; his brother: Raymond Lee Peters, died July 5, 2016 and his sister-in-law: Rita L. Peters, died April 20, 2015.Funeral services will be conducted Friday, March 10, 2017, at 11:00 am, by Bro. Hobert Byrd, at the Haskell & Morrison Funeral Home, 208 Ferry Street Vevay, Indiana 47043.Interment will follow in the Vevay Cemetery, Vevay, Indiana.Friends may call 10:00 am – 11:00 am, Friday, March 10, 2017, at the Haskell & Morrison Funeral Home 208 Ferry Street Vevay, Indiana 47043.Memorial contributions may be made to Charity of the Donor’s Choice. Cards are available at the funeral home.last_img read more


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Ex-Arsenal player advises Saka to remain at the club

first_img Loading… Traore went on to stress the necessity of Aubameyang signing a new contract. The Gabon international; has one more year to run and is yet to commit. He also implored Arsenal to get Ghana midfielder Thomas Partey from Atletico Madrid. “First of all, they need to keep Aubameyang if they want to do that [finish in the top four],” Traore explained. read also:CHANGE OF NATIONALITY: Saka’s parents plead for time as NFF finally contacts player “I would strengthen the central defence. I wouldn’t mind a guy like Partey in there sitting in front of the defence or somebody a bit angry. He [Partey] reminds me a bit of your Gilberto [Silva] or [Patrick] Vieira [in terms of] somebody who can go out there and give it a go. “They’re playing good football. I’m really impressed with Arsenal at the moment, if I have to be honest. “I think Arteta has done a great job and I can only see them doing well in the future.” FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 Ex-Arsenal left-back, Armand Traore, has offered some advice to wonderkid Bukayo Saka, urging him to stay at the club for much of his career. The Anglo-Nigerian wonderkid starred for the Gunners during the past season, having a hand in 15 goals (four goals, 11 assists) as the North Londoners lifted the FA Cup by dispatching Chelsea 2-0 at Wembley. Saka was at his premium best again during the Community Shield against Liverpool, providing the assist for Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang’s goal, Mikel Arteta’s men ultimately winning 5-4 on penalties. Saka had recently signed a new contract that will keep him at the Emirates until 2024, but Traore – who was with Arsenal between 2006 and 2011, making 33 competitive appearances, wants the teenager to remain there even past a decade. “I think he’s an unbelievable little player. He’s very exciting and I enjoy watching him play,” Traore told TalkSPORT. “The advice I would give him would be stay surrounded by good people because I’ve suffered a lot from that [and] I’ve made really bad choices in my career. If you’re not surrounded by the right people, you will go downhill from there. “I would tell him to stay at Arsenal. Now, if I had the chance, I would not have left Arsenal and I think I would have stayed for a few more years. “Be patient and enjoy every time you play and work hard and be professional. Talent is not enough. I used to think that when I was younger and how arrogant I was to think that. If you can couple the talent with the hard work, he will be at Arsenal for the next decade, probably more.”center_img Promoted ContentWhich Country Is The Most Romantic In The World?7 Non-Obvious Things That Damage Your Phone7 Universities Where Getting An Education Costs A Hefty PennyCouples Who Celebrated Their Union In A Unique, Unforgettable Way5 Of The World’s Most Unique Theme ParksThis Is Why Plus-Size Models Should Always Be An InspirationWhat Happens To Your Brain When You Play Too Much Video Games?Ever Thought Of Sleeping Next To Celebs? This Guy Will Show You8 Superfoods For Growing Hair Back And Stimulating Its Growth8 Scenes That Prove TV Has Gone Too Far8 Things That Will Happen If An Asteroid Hits Earth6 Incredibly Strange Facts About Hurricaneslast_img read more


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United tighten grip with Black Cats win

first_img United probably should have killed the game off long before the final whistle, but they did enough to extend their lead at the top of the table, for a few hours at least, to 18 points, the perfect preparation for Monday night’s FA Cup quarter-final replay at Chelsea. Sir Alex Ferguson did not even include Rio Ferdinand and Wayne Rooney in his 18 with Monday’s trip to Stamford Bridge looming large, but his side eased their way through the first half without ever having to find top gear. There were 12 minutes gone when full-back Alex Buttner embarked upon a determined run which took him past both Craig Gardner and Bardsley and deep into the penalty area, where Mignolet managed to block his close-range effort – but he could do nothing about the chain of events which led to the opening goal with 27 minutes gone. Van Persie picked up possession on the left side of the penalty area, but found himself confronted by Bardsley. The striker patiently worked himself into a position to shoot, but when he unleashed his drive, it flew off Bardsley’s boot on to Bramble’s knee and inside the far post. The home side returned after the break knowing they had to go for broke if they were to get anything out of the game, but United retained possession at will with the movement of Shinji Kagawa and Van Persie, and Michael Carrick’s composure simply too much for their hosts, who were seeing too little of the ball to bring wide men Adam Johnson and James McClean into play. However, the former Manchester City winger finally got the bit between his teeth with 59 minutes gone when he burst into the penalty area. His cross was blocked, but Bardsley latched on to the loose ball, only to fire harmlessly over the top. Van Persie should have made sure deep into injury-time after Ashley Young had evaded Bramble’s lunge and squared, but Mignolet made a remarkable stop to deny him. The luckless defender unwittingly turned Robin van Persie’s 27th-minute shot past keeper Simon Mignolet after it had also clipped Phil Bardsley on its way to goal. The Black Cats were barely in the game before the break, but buoyed by United’s failure to build upon their lead, rallied after it without ever testing keeper David de Gea as they extended their run without a league win to eight games in front of a crowd of 43,760. Titus Bramble’s unfortunate own goal allowed Manchester United to tighten their stranglehold on the Barclays Premier League title as they recorded a narrow 1-0 victory at Sunderland.center_img Press Associationlast_img read more


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Madigan the hero in Leinster win

first_img As Ulster dictated early on, Pienaar put Tommy Bowe through a gap and Iain Henderson had to be hauled down five metres short before Jackson gave the visitors a deserved advantage. Leinster got a psychological edge from a scrum penalty, but they were left to rue two crooked lineouts and a kick out on the full from their latest centurion Eoin Reddan. The Kearney brothers combined to offer the first glimpse of Leinster’s attacking class, Dave weaving his way over halfway and fellow winger McFadden added further momentum to the eye-catching counter. Again, though, errors stopped Leinster in their tracks and a slashing midfield break from Gopperth also came to nothing as Ulster forced a turnover. Leinster then coughed up possession for a third time in the visitors’ 22, Cian Healy knocking on after a decent lineout maul. D’Arcy saw yellow for a late tackle on his Ireland colleague Bowe six minutes before the break, allowing Ulster to dominate up to the half-time whistle. Snappy passing released Jared Payne and Craig Gilroy to take Ulster back into the Leinster 22 and Jackson punished a Reddan offside with the last kick of the half. The second period burst into life with strong carries from Trimble and Healy, D’Arcy’s return briefly steadying the Leinster ship as the jinking Gilroy grew in influence. There was concern for O’Driscoll who was left prone after an awkward tackle on Henderson. The record Irish caps holder received a rapturous reception as he was replaced by Madigan. A frustrating night for Leinster’s centre duo continued as D’Arcy came in from an offside position and Jackson mopped up with the three points. However, the Ulster out-half had to hobble off soon after with James McKinney – the match winner against Munster – coming on. The complexion of the game seemed to change as man of the match Madigan broke the line and Leinster drew a 58th-minute penalty which Gopperth drove through the uprights. Back came Ulster, McFadden having to scramble back to rescue the situation after Gopperth was charged down by Pienaar. But Leinster’s strong bench, which included the fit-again Sean O’Brien, swung the momentum back in their favour as Gopperth’s second penalty made it a three-point game. The excellent Gilroy almost put Roger Wilson over in the left corner and Pienaar was chopped down in sight of the try-line as Ulster responded in determined fashion. The knocks kept coming as a knee injury sidelined Dave Kearney, forcing Leinster to bring reserve scrum-half Luke McGrath onto the wing. Despite the disruption, Matt O’Connor’s men managed to turn the screw as Madigan was fed to burst in between McKinney and Payne and score the only try of the night. Gopperth nailed the important conversion from the left, leaving Ulster four points adrift. Best and company threw the kitchen sink at the home side in the dying minutes, Payne being held up just short and two lineout mauls were also thwarted as Leinster’s superior defence just about won out in the end. Madigan, who replaced a groggy Brian O’Driscoll for the closing half-hour, unlocked the visitors’ defence with an O’Driscoll-esque break to put Leinster in front for the first time. Jimmy Gopperth converted and Leinster’s defiant defence held the Ulstermen at bay in a frantic finish, with the 13-9 result keeping alive O’Driscoll’s dreams of a fourth PRO12 title. The comeback win ensured that the retiring O’Driscoll – a league winner in 2001, 2008 and 2013 – will have his career swansong when Leinster host Glasgow Warriors in the May 31 final. His long-time centre partner Gordon D’Arcy ended the first half in the sin-bin, with Ulster full value for their 6-0 interval lead thanks to two Paddy Jackson penalties. Out-of-sorts Leinster fell further behind following a third Jackson kick, but they came to the fore in the closing stages despite losing backs O’Driscoll, Fergus McFadden and Dave Kearney in an attritional derby clash. Ulster played the better rugby for the first hour, however they did not have the points to show for it and their attempts to win silverware for retiring captain Johann Muller fell short. Leinster have been Ulster’s knockout nemeses in recent seasons, defeating their provincial rivals in league and Heineken Cup finals and now two league semi-finals (2011 and 2014). Incredibly, it will be Leinster’s fifth straight league final appearance as they bid to become the first team to successfully retain the trophy. The RDS will host the decider for the fourth time in five seasons. Ulster were the last team to beat Leinster in league fare at the RDS in March 2013, and they made the return trip in buoyant mood after their second-string team claimed Munster’s scalp last weekend. Mark Anscombe welcomed back key men Rory Best and Ruan Pienaar into a much-changed side, the latter pulling a long-range penalty wide in the fourth minute. Ian Madigan emerged as the match-winner for Leinster as his 72nd-minute try decided Saturday evening’s attritional RaboDirect PRO12 semi-final against Ulster at the RDS. Press Associationlast_img read more


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Barnes see red as Burnley stumble

first_imgMidfielder Ashley Barnes’ recklessness cost Burnley the chance of salvaging a point at Everton as the struggling Clarets dropped to the bottom of the Premier League. Manager Sean Dyche previously defended the 24-year-old after Jose Mourinho described the studs-up lunge at Matic as “criminal” but the way the player threw himself about the Goodison Park pitch in the opening 45 minutes was not indicative of someone displaying good judgement or the necessary control. Burnley’s manager and players complained about Barnes’s first booking for a wild swipe at James McCarthy as the Republic of Ireland midfielder raced away from him midway through the half but referee Mike Jones, who allowed play to continue before returning to show a yellow card, was in no doubt about the intent. So when Barnes slid into Seamus Coleman just seconds before the break the official had no option but to issue another yellow card followed by a red, meaning he misses next week’s crucial encounter at home to Leicester whose victory over Swansea dropped the Clarets to the foot of the table. That Mirallas appeared fortunate to receive only a booking for a studs-up challenge on George Boyd early in the second half only increased Dyche’s frustration, already unhappy that Ross Barkley’s penalty saved by Tom Heaton with the score at 0-0 had come from a David Jones tackle just outside the area. Mirallas’ goal and Barnes’ red card ensured that incident was only a minor talking point as Everton once again, and somewhat unfathomably, opted to ignore the qualities of Leighton Baines, scorer of 15 from 16 from the spot. That first happened in January when Mirallas stepped up in front of the England defender against West Brom but failed, after which manager Roberto Martinez clarified his left-back was the confirmed taker only for striker Romelu Lukaku – who returned from a month out with a hamstring injury as a second-half substitute – to score the next three. Why Baines has been removed from penalty duties remains mystifying but Mirallas at least spared Barkley’s embarrassment by converting his own mis-kick at the second attempt in the 29th minute from McCarthy’s cross. Jones immediately wastefully fired over with only Tim Howard to beat before midfielder Gareth Barry tracked back behind his defenders to block a shot from Barnes, who later wanted a penalty when his cross hit the arm of John Stones. Barnes may have controversially avoided punishment for a wild tackle on Chelsea’s Nemanja Matic back in February but there was no escape as two ill-advised challenges – one which did not even connect with an opponent – saw him sent off in first-half added time at Goodison Park. Burnley were already trailing to Kevin Mirallas’s goal and with 10 men they could not claw back that deficit, losing 1-0. Press Association After the break Arouna Kone’s near-post shot from a Baines cross was saved by Heaton, who was then fouled as the ball broke loose, McCarthy side-footed wide and Baines’ drive was parried by the Burnley goalkeeper as Everton failed to make their numerical advantage count. Burnley’s problems -self-inflicted ones aside – are plain for all to see. They have won just twice in 35 away matches in their two seasons in the Premier League and have not scored in six hours and 29 minutes in the current campaign. Danny Ings, who has now not scored in eight league matches, headed over their best chance of an equaliser with five minutes to go. However, they remain only two points from safety, although 17th-placed Hull have a match in hand and a superior goal difference meaning next week’s visit of Leicester falls into the “must-win” category. Everton have no such problems as 13 points from the last 15 – equalling a season’s best five matches unbeaten having not lost at home in 2015 – has them comfortably mid-table. Their biggest issue is finding the motivation not to coast towards the end of a disappointing season. last_img read more