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Be grateful for the blessings of the U.S.

first_imgWe raised five children, for 30 consecutive years, in the Schenectady school district. I have always been a strong advocate of the district and the educational opportunities that are available — if you choose to take advantage of them.The picture of the football teams in the Sept. 30 Gazette was great. It seems the coaches and players handled the situation nicely. They are to be commended for their maturity and resolve.That picture and the many flags I see flying (seems like there’s a lot these days) remind me that we live in a God-blessed country. We are not perfect, we are very diverse and we will never all agree on the same things.However, when was the last time you read or heard about people literally or figuratively dying to get into any other country in the world? This should speak to us that despite our differences, we should be thankful for the bounty and blessings of this country. We should continue to lend a helping hand here and around the world.Susan HoverSchenectadyMore from The Daily Gazette:Schenectady department heads: Budget cutbacks would further stress already-stretched departmentsEDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationSchenectady NAACP calls for school layoff freeze, reinstatement of positionsSchenectady police reform sessions pivot to onlineSchenectady High School senior class leaders look to salvage sense of normalcy Categories: Letters to the Editor, Opinionlast_img read more

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UK consults on new approach to defined benefit pension regulation

first_imgThe UK’s pensions regulator has launched a consultation on its oversight of the defined benefit (DB) market to better account for the current low interest rate environment and growing maturity of many funds.The consultation on the new code of practice, open until early February, will also seek to incorporate the Pensions Regulator’s (TPR) new statutory objective requiring it to have a “regard for the growth prospects of companies”.TPR noted that its current code had not been amended since the regulator was launched in 2005, and said it now possessed a better understanding of the DB market and how best to regulate it.“Difficult economic conditions – for example, low interest rates and volatile markets – as well as continuing increases in longevity in recent years, have also challenged schemes’ funding positions further and putting pressure on their employers,” the regulator said in its introduction. It emphasised that risk management would be a “guiding principle” in the revised code, “as it is key to schemes achieving good funding outcomes”, and said it would like to define a balanced funding outcome (BFO) for schemes to use as a key indicator of risk during assessments.The regulator also said the way it approaches DB deficits would be reviewed on an annual basis in future “to reflect the prevailing economic circumstances”.“Whilst the broad principles underpinning the approach and the factors we take into consideration are contained in the funding policy, the actual setting of risk indicators (including the BFO) and risk bar for intervention will be discussed on an annual basis and published in our annual funding statement,” it said.TPR first issued a funding statement in 2012, allowing DB funds undergoing triennial valuations during the financial year to better understand its approach.Helen Forrest, head of policy and research at the National Association of Pension Funds, welcomed the consultation, noting the more integrated approach being proposed by TPR.She added: “We are pleased to see the Pensions Regulator recognises collaboration between employers and trustees is crucial in establishing viable, long-term funding plans for DB schemes.”Aon Hewitt partner Aidan O’Mahony also said the consultation marked a “positive” step and welcomed the proposal for the guiding principle based around the sponsor covenant, investment returns and scheme funding.“It is also good that the regulator is being more transparent by providing information on how it ranks employer covenants,” he added, noting the four risk categories of Strong, Tending to Strong, Tending to Weak and Weak.However, Malcolm Rochowski, corporate consultant at Barnett Waddingham, had one concern on how the new statutory objective would be implemented.“There is one sting in the tail of the new objective – an expectation that planned investments used to negotiate down scheme contributions, but which are not actually invested later, should be made available to the scheme,” he said.“Employers must, therefore, be careful in claims made about their plans for capital investment.”last_img read more


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Diversity, ESG relatively low scheme governance priorities: survey

first_img“ESG” and external governance reviews also came out as low priorities in the ranking, according to the survey report, which did not define ESG beyond “environmental, social, and corporate governance”.It said some participants were not sure what ESG meant.“This is despite it receiving media attention and initiatives such as the Association of Member Nominated Trustees’ Red Line Voting to support trustees in being investors who are well-versed in ESG,” it noted.A recent BNP Paribas Securities Services survey of 461 asset owners and asset managers found that a fifth of respondents did not incorporate ESG, with the main reason being an inability to define it.In the Winmark/Sackers survey, regular board meetings came out as the most important governance element, with a score of 4.9. However, there was little variation in the scores for the top 10 elements (see graphic). For example, ‘clear and transparent communication’ came in as the 10th most important ranking with a score of 4.6.The survey found that trustees were spending 65% more time on governance compared with three years ago, although the majority of boards spent less than 20% of their time on governance.Sackers said that governance was “a balancing act” and that prioritising of tasks was a key part of good governance.“Prioritising is part of good governance, and so is having an understanding of what will add value and where efforts are most likely to be rewarded,” it added. “While the aspects of governance that were considered to be of least importance all have value, it is reasuring that the main priorities are understood.”The report is available to download from Sackers’ website. Board diversity, ESG investing, and external reviews are relatively low governance priorities for pension scheme trustees and managers, according to a report.It was produced by Winmark, which runs professional member networks to facilitate peer learning, and Sackers, a law firm. It was based on a survey of 84 pension schemes – trustees and pension managers – and 13 in-depth interviews with chairs of trustee boards and other pensions experts.Board diversity in terms of gender, ethnicity and age came last out of a list of 25 governance elements that survey participants were asked to rank for importance, on a scale of 1-5. The report said this did not mean trustees think diversity was not important. “In their defence, many survey participants do recognise the need for diversity of skills and perspectives,” it said. “They just do not see diversity in trustees’ individual characteristics such as gender, age, or ethnicity as on a par with certain other aspects of governance.“Also, difficulties recruiting trustees mean that boards often do not have many candidates.”The UK’s pensions trade body has launched a ‘Breaking the Mirror Image’ campaign to try to encourage greater diversity on trustee boards and pension executive boards. It also put diversity at the heart of its annual investment conference in March.  #*#*Show Fullscreen*#*#last_img read more


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Guyanese attorney appointed special constable in Antigua

first_img Share Sharing is caring! 24 Views   no discussions NewsRegional Guyanese attorney appointed special constable in Antigua by: – January 9, 2012 Tweetcenter_img Share Share Datadin, who is representing the prime minister in a defamation lawsuit brought by Bird (pictured above), has denied any conflict of interestST JOHN’S, Antigua- Guyanese attorney Sanjeev Datadin has been appointed as a special constable to assist with investigations into the US$14 million dollar Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co Ltd (IHI) case and other fraud-related matters.His appointment on Tuesday was only made public yesterday.Former Prime Minister Lester Bird and one-time Finance Minister Asot Michael – both senior members of the main opposition Antigua Labour Party (ALP) – are among those linked to the 1990s scheme under which the funds, earmarked for loan repayment to the Japan-based IHI, were said to have been misappropriated.The appointment has been denounced by Senior Counsel Anthony Astaphan, a legal advisor to ALP members.“What they are intending to do is to subvert the position of the DPP (Director of Public Prosecutions), seek to have a lawyer dressed up in the court as a constable with the powers of arrest, which strikes me as a fundamental conflict between a person who should be independently and impartially reviewing the evidence to decide whether an arrest should be made,” he contended.Datadin, who is representing the prime minister in a defamation lawsuit brought by Bird, has denied any conflict of interest.“I am no part of the government of Antigua nor have I represented the government of Antigua,” he said.“Attorneys are retained to do a job, and if you are retained to do a job, then you do your job. The only conflict that you would have and the only conflict you should not cross is (that) you can’t do a job for a person on one hand while working against them on the other.”He explained being “extremely disappointed that members of the ALP and their advisors have chosen to characterise my assistance to the Royal Police Force of Antigua & Barbuda as political rather than to acknowledge that matters of possible serious commercial fraud which may have taken from and diminished the opportunities of the Antiguan & Barbudan people is being resolved.” Caribbean 360 Newslast_img read more


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ORVC Weekly Report (March 25-April 6)

first_imgORVC Weekly Report (March 25-April 6)Players of the Week.Baseball: Landon Cole – Rising Sun and Dylan Swinney – Jac-Cen-DelSoftball: Sydney Pitts – Rising Sun and Madelyn Tompkis – South RipleyBoys Golf: Matt Schmidt – MilanBoys Track: Mitchell Cline – SouthwesternGirls Track: Megan Cole – South RipleyORVC Report(March 25-April 6)2019Courtesy of ORVC Recorder Travis Calvert.last_img


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First Financial collects supplies for Franklin County Humane Society

first_imgBrookville, In. — The First Financial Bank branch in Brookville will hold a “pet supply drive” in support of the Franklin County Humane Society from June 10 through 15.The following items are needed:BleachCat & Dog FoodTreatsChew ToysLitter Boxes & ScoopsPet CarriersGrooming SuppliesFor information about pet adoption options please call 765-647-3591.last_img


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City open £200m training complex

first_img Press Association And with competition for the brightest young players increasingly stiff among European football’s biggest teams, he thinks City are now at the head of the queue. Fans of neighbours Manchester United, though, might bristle at his suggestion that local prospects now face an “easy choice” when it comes to their career path. “When we started training here with the boys I looked around and said ‘how amazing’. I think this is one of the best, if not the best, facilities in the world,” he said of the 80-acre base that was previously a polluted brownfield site. “If we go into the market and we compete to bring young players or first team players in, having a facility like this can only help. “When you are a young, talented player from Manchester – or worldwide – you want the best possible facilities to challenge and improve yourself. “(You want) the club that will give you the best chance because at that age you dream about being a first-team player and I think when you look at these facilities that will be an easy choice. “You can’t compare this to any other. Arsenal was really good, Inter was really good, but I think this training facility takes it to a different level.” The complex is connected to the Etihad Stadium by bridge and houses all of the club’s teams, from age-group sides to men’s and women’s senior squads – a total in excess of 450 individuals weekly. The first team will stay on site the night before home matches, while Vieira’s elite development squad team and Manchester City Women will play at an integrated 7,000-capacity stadium. But for some the true success of the project will only be measured in future by graduates from the youth set-up to the first XI. Vieira is intimately involved in helping deliver a target of four-to-six homegrown players in the senior side and is optimistic the CFA will accelerate the process. “We know how difficult it will be for them to make it but we have to fulfill the potential,” he said. “We have a responsibility to them and when you have a facility like this you give youth all the chance to make it. “Of course it is important because fans like to identify with the local players. “Seventy per cent of our Academy players are from Manchester. I look at my team in the EDS and the captain Kean Bryan was born five minutes from the stadium. “But when we talk about development it takes time. We have a clear idea of how we want to develop these young players and now we have to be patient, work hard and see who will be the next elite player.” City chairman Khaldoon Al Mubarak, who escorted Osborne on a tour, believes the opening represents the first stage of fulfilling a promise made when the Abu Dhabi United Group took over six years ago. “At the outset of his ownership, back in autumn 2008, His Highness Sheikh Mansour bin Zayed Al Nahyan set out his vision for the future of Manchester City Football Club,” said Khaldoon. “He pledged to bring success on the field and to nurture young talent, whilst at the same time remaining proudly rooted to the community in which it resided. “The cornerstone of the future, was a vision for youth development and sustainability; a vision to educate talented young footballers on and off the pitch and to do so in a facility supported by the best coaches and coaching programmes. The vision was underpinned by an unwavering commitment to the regeneration of the local area in both economic and environmental terms. “Today marks the beginning of a responsibility to deliver against the opportunities that this Academy now creates for us.” Osborne, who used the platform to announce a £50million five-year government investment in grassroots football, hailed the CFA development as a model example for others to follow. “I am a strong believer in improving sporting facilities for young people, which is why I am delighted to oversee the opening of the City Football Academy,” he said. “The partnership between Abu Dhabi United Group and Manchester City Council is a benchmark for public private partnership, driving investment into the north of England and developing projects where business and the community benefit.” The Barclays Premier League champions have been based at the state-of-the-art City Football Academy since October, but officially opened the doors on Monday at a glitzy ceremony attended by club greats and Chancellor George Osborne. Vieira, who runs City’s elite development squad, spent his playing days at the likes of Arsenal, Juventus and Inter Milan, but believes his new workplace puts the rest firmly in the shade. Patrick Vieira believes Manchester City’s new £200million training complex will help the club attract the best young players in the world – starting with the city itself.last_img read more


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What Next for Emmanuel Emenike?

first_img“Thank you, Westerlo for making me feel at home and welcome. Let’s get some wins and go for the title. Project Promotion,” he had written on his Instagram page minutes after he was signed in September.According to the club statement, Emenike did not reach the expected level of performance after managing just one start in five league games with no goal to his credit. His short-term contract was to expire at the end of the season but both parties agreed on its termination last Thursday.“Emmanuel Emenike and KVC Westerlo have decided in mutual agreement to end their collaboration. Despite the many efforts made by both parties in the best understanding, the player could not be brought to the level that both parties had intended,” the statement read.“In those circumstances, it was appropriate to end the agreement with a good feeling. KVC Westerlo wants to thank Emmanuel for choosing and trusting the club and the player wishes to thank the club for the opportunity he was granted.”His move to Belgium meant the much-travelled and vastly-experienced Emenike had joined his tenth professional club in nine years, after stints in South Africa, Turkey, Russia, United Arab Emirates, England, Spain and Greece.Prior to his move to Belgium, the former Nigerian international did not play football in the entire 2018-19 season after suffering an injury last year during his loan spell in the Spanish La Liga with Las Palmas.Emenike’s first “missionary journey to Turkey” with Fenerbahce was more of controversy than memorable. He was accused of match-fixing, though he was later released without charge.In his second stint with the Turkish side, he was very unpopular with the club’s supporters largely due to his poor performance, scoring only four goals in 27 appearances. So much so that he once stormed off the field after he was abused by his own fans, culminating in a move to UAE side, Al Ain on loan.Emenike later joined Greek champions, Olympiakos from Fenerbahce, after signing a two-year deal and a fee said to be about $2.8 million. After struggling with injuries and lack of first-team football, Olympiakos provided him with a platform that includes the European Champions League.“I know there are big expectations from the fans and club, but I am ready. I’ve joined the most successful club in Greek football and I want to give my best for the team,” the 30-year-old had told BBC Sport.The former Super Eagles striker was the sixth Nigerian player to sign for Olympiakos of Greece, following in the footsteps of Rashidi Yekini, James Obiorah, Haruna Babangida, Michael Olaitan and Brown Ideye.Between the summer of 2009 and 2012, the forward averaged over 14 league goals per season with Karabukspor and Spartak. During the 2013-14 campaign, he managed 12 goals in 28 league outings for Fener, but in 2014, despite making only one league outing less, he contributed only four goals.After a memorable display against Bosnia-Herzegovina at the 2014 World Cup in Brazil, in which he drove down the left flank, leaving defenders in his wake before setting up Osaze Odemwingie’s pivotal winner, Emenike went on 15 international matches without a goal. Late coach Stephen Keshi had to drop Emenike, who previously would have been the first name on the list.He made 93 appearances in all competitions during his time at Fenerbahce scoring 25 goals.Emenike came to limelight when he was invited to the national team for a friendly game against Sierra Leone. Thereafter, he was called up to Nigeria’s 23-man squad for the 2013 Africa Cup of Nations and scored in the opening match against Burkina Faso in a 1–1 draw. He also scored the first goal in the quarter-final match between Nigeria and Côte d’Ivoire which Nigeria won 2–1.He is fondly remembered at Fenerbahce and Spartak Moscow for bullying opposition defence.Share this:FacebookRedditTwitterPrintPinterestEmailWhatsAppSkypeLinkedInTumblrPocketTelegram When Emmanuel Emenike joined Belgian First Division B club Westerlo in September as a free agent, he not only saw it as an opportunity to revive his dwindling career, the former Fenerbahce of Turkey striker also set a tall order for himself-to help the club secure promotion to the top-flight. It was however not to be as less than two months after signing he was sacked. Could this be the end of a once-bright football star? Emmanuel Emenike’s four goals at the 2013 Africa Cup of Nations in South Africa was crucial to Nigeria’s winning the biennial competition for the third time, giving some observers the impression that a striker that would fill the vacuum left by Super Eagles all-time highest goal scorer, Rashidi Yekini, had finally arrived. It was however not to be, as his career nosedived. His involvement in many controversies with his various clubs did not help matters too.Belgian First Division B club Westerlo last week released Emenike, just two months after he joined the club as a free agent in September. The former West Ham United striker had joined Bob Peeters’ side two months ago with the ambition of helping them secure promotion to the top-flight after having a successful trial.last_img read more


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Offensive improvements guide Syracuse in Kraus-Simmons Trophy win over Hobart

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ GENEVA — With 8:02 left in the third quarter, a jacketed Syracuse player peeled away from a huddle, heard House of Pain’s “Jump Around” blaring through Urick Stadium and hopped twice. As the huddle broke, two more Orange reserves shimmied back to their spot on the sideline. It was easy to celebrate their most-recent scoring run — an extended 12-goal stretch that was at six scores at the time. But this one was different, if only slightly. This one secured the Kraus-Simmons Trophy and SU head coach John Desko’s 250th win. For the 2019 season, it showed that the Orange can put away an opponent rather than catch up to one. “It felt like everything went their way from the middle of that second quarter on,” Hobart head coach Greg Raymond said. “You look at these stats, there’s not a ton of discrepancy. … I think they scored goals when they had opportunities.”Challenging the second-best offense in the country (16.11 goals per game), No. 11 Syracuse (6-3, 1-2 Atlantic Coast) completed its second-best offensive showing of the season. Its 17 goals, 10 of which were the only scores of the second half, led it past No. 20 Hobart (8-2, 2-0 Northeast), 17-5, on Tuesday night. Bradley Voigt and Jacob Buttermore each tallied hat tricks. Nate Solomon and Stephen Rehfuss each dished three assists. And a revamped pregame routine prevented another slow-start for the Orange. After 15 minutes two weeks ago, the Orange were down 4-2 to Duke. Two days ago, SU stared at a nine-goal deficit versus the Fighting Irish. Facing the Statesmen’s multi-faceted offense, Syracuse knew it couldn’t afford another early deficit. And despite 17 turnovers, the unit did enough to win its rivalry game for a 31st time. AdvertisementThis is placeholder text“We’ve struggled in a few games in the first half, so I thought we improved on that,” Desko said. “… Some of the things we worked on this week were getting better earlier. And then trying to continue things that we’ve done in the second half. So we’re able to do that.”Anna Henderson | Digital Design EditorSo before the game, the Orange shot at different colored patches in the corners of the goal but then changed it up. Four defenders in white pullovers guarded Syracuse’s crease. SU attack in blue jerseys passed around them, eyeing openings and lofting shots. The goal was to get attack “comfortable,” Voigt said. To open the scoring, Solomon threaded a pass to Rehfuss across the zone, giving SU the lead. Later in the frame, Brendan Curry fed Jamie Trimboli down the middle of Hobart’s defense. While Desko mentioned that the Orange started “a little slow,” the improved routine worked partially on Tuesday night.“Sometimes if you put too much of an emphasis on something,” Desko said of the early-game struggles, “then they’ll go out and maybe try to force some things.” A more patient offense emerged in the second quarter. Buttermore and midfielder David Lipka darted through Hobart’s zone and registered goals. Voigt added a pair before getting his third following halftime. After Desko stressed for weeks that slow starts were an issue that demanded fixing, the Orange carried a two-goal lead into halftime. After the break, Syracuse again displayed the in-game adjustments that’s carried it at times this season. While the defense held the Statesmen scoreless in the second half, the offense added pressure by scoring nearly each time it wrangled possession. Increased ball movement and spacing triggered another offensive run. The Orange ran out on fast breaks, something Hobart spent the majority of game trying to do itself. Defenders Brett Kennedy and Tyson Bomberry ventured into the midfield on clears, sparking quick passes. With 13:12 left in the third quarter, Voigt slid near the crease and swung a shot home to put SU up three. Later in the frame, he picked off Hobart goalie Sam Lucchesi and ripped home the Orange’s 13th score, sending some fans down the bleacher steps and toward the exit. “Something we talked about all week,” Raymond said of Voigt’s second goal. “… Right then you start to see our game plan break down a little bit.” More fans left their seats after Jakob Phaup (13-of-20) won the next face-off. Another handful departed when Curry got on the board. By the fourth quarter, reserves rotated through. Postgame, Voigt sat and reflected on the warmup change that eventually turned into Syracuse’s best single-game performance of the season. “I think it worked out really well,” Voigt said of the switch before glancing at Desko and smirking. “I think we should do it going forward.” Comments Published on April 2, 2019 at 10:58 pm Contact Nick: nialvare@syr.edu | @nick_a_alvarezlast_img read more


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Rakitic Commits Self to Barca

first_imgIvan Rakitic’s working relationship with Barcelona boss Luis Enrique has fallen under the microscope of late, but the Croatian insists he remains fully committed to the Camp Nou cause.In fact, the 28-year-old midfielder says he is so supportive of the man who brought him to Catalunya that he would throw himself off a bridge if asked to do so. For now, Rakitic’s sole aim is trying to convince his manager that he is deserving of a regular spot in his starting XI.He has been favoured since the winter break, but endured a tough period during December when he was dropped for three games on the back of being hauled off in a Clasico draw with Real Madrid.Rakitic has also been caught up in speculation regarding his long-term future, with discussions regarding an extension to a contract due to run until 2019 said to have stalled.Luis Enrique has not always taken kindly to quizzing on the issue, telling reporters prior to Christmas: “I’ve got no interest in justifying myself to a player of mine. I’m not going to do that. Rakitic has been and will be a good player for Barca.”While the pair may not have always seen eye-to-eye this season, Rakitic maintains that he will continue to give his all to a manager who placed considerable faith in his ability when snapping him up from Sevilla in 2014.He told France Football: “Luis Enrique has helped me enormously, giving me confidence straight away, as did my teammates, which enabled me to work calmly.“It was Luis Enrique who asked the club to sign me.“If I had to throw myself off a bridge for him, I would do it without hesitation. With just a look or a smile, he gives you the confidence necessary to succeed.”Rakitic needed a calming influence after arriving at Camp Nou, as he found himself thrust into a star-studded squad.He was also billed as the long-term successor to Barcelona icon Xavi, but the Croatia international says the World Cup winner helped to make that transition seamless, rather than daunting.Rakitic added: “Xavi gave me a lot. I have just two words to say to him, it would be ‘Thank you’. The only thing I regret is to have played just a single season with him.“I learned so much from on and off the pitch, during our away trips, in the dressing room. I took advantage of every moment by his side during that season. What Xavi gave this club, his teammates and the fans is unique.Share this:FacebookRedditTwitterPrintPinterestEmailWhatsAppSkypeLinkedInTumblrPocketTelegramlast_img read more