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Lukas Nelson Finds ‘Something Real’ On Newest Album [Review]

first_imgSurprise! Suddenly, and before you can even finish pressing play; Lukas Nelson and his band, Promise of the Real, launch into an unforgiving hard rock icebreaker that hits you like a ton of bricks. The vocals ring with passion, the drums pound with hurricane force, the bass hammers like thunder, and the guitars ooze with attitude. Of course, we’re talking about none other than the foot-stomping, hip-shaking, kick-ass opening track called “Surprise.” Immediately it is apparent that we’re in for a wild ride. Something different. Something aggressive. Something Real.Something Real is the highly-anticipated third album from this boundless band of California blues-rockers. Renowned for their collaboration with Neil Young, serving as the rock legend’s backing band on Young’s 2015 politically-charged protest album The Monsanto Years (read the review here); Promise of the Real provided an unforgettable and hard-hitting edge to compliment the album’s revolutionary message.Following the insistent introduction of “Surprise,” the boys rip into another hard-rocking recipe for a good time; the in-your-face, stop-and-go title track. I challenge you to not bang your head as the main riff kicks in with it’s tsunami-like strength. Their groove is unmistakable and infectious as hell, and this song is a prime example of that musical voodoo that ignites within. The boogie is contagious.One of the record’s most enjoyable songs, is the grin-inducing, sexy, upbeat groove called “I’ll Make Love to You Any Ol’ Time.” Drummer Anthony LoGerfo and percussionist Tato Melgar have some room to stretch out on this song as their intertwining rhythms fill-out the band’s festively ferocious style. “Make Love to You” is a song that can be summed up as ‘pure Rock n’ Roll fun.’ Classic ingredients that make for a classically good time.One thing that is instantly recognizable, is how great of an influence Neil Young has been on the band. There is a natural edge to both of their musical styles, and Lukas Nelson doesn’t hold this back. His ever-so-passionate vocals are strong, heartfelt and sincere, with tinges of Neil percolating beneath the surface. The song “Everything is Fake” is a good illustration of this artistic approach. “Am I the one I’ve never really known? Is there a price upon this golden throne?” pleads a crooning Lukas Nelson as the song reaches it’s apex. It is an extremely powerful track, with vocals that overflow with raw emotion. With a pulsating bass line, and guitars-a-blaring; this track is a musical force of nature.The mood mellows on more laid-back tracks such as “Georgia” and “Set Me Down on a Cloud,” while “Ugly Color” and “Don’t Want to Fly” keep up the pace throughout the album’s midsection. The synth intro on “Ugly Color” is a pleasantly interesting choice, which comes across almost like an ELO archetype before it slips into something more comfortable and relaxed for the remainder of the song.The legend himself, Neil Young appears on the album’s final track; a fast-paced cover version of Scott McKenzie’s 1967 counter-culture classic “San Francisco (Be Sure to Wear Flowers in Your Hair.)” It is an uplifting and out-of-the-ordinary take on a song that has historically become a standard of the ‘Summer of Love.’ Most definitely a clever take on a classic, and certainly worthy of note.All in all, Something Real is a full and well-rounded record. It’s a promising next step for Promise of the Real. Lukas Nelson and his brother Micah have cultivated a sound that after listened to, becomes etched in your mind. As far as we are concerned, Neil was just as lucky to have worked with Promise of the Real as they were to have worked with Young. If there is one promise that Promise of the Real continues to keep, it is the promise of something real. This record is it.Something Real hits shelves on tomorrow, March 11th, 2016. Get on it! More information about Promise of the Real and their new album can be found on the band’s website.By Joseph Conlonlast_img read more

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Herbie Hancock, Kamasi Washington Announce Co-Headlining Tour

first_imgTwo of the most recognizable names in the modern jazz world, Herbie Hancock and Kamasi Washington, have announced a summer 2019 co-headlining tour.The first leg of the joint tour will begin on July 30th at Vienna, VA’s Wolf Trap and continues throughout the month of August before wrapping with a show at The Greek Theatre in Berkeley, CA on August 23rd. The NPR tour announcement also notes that additional dates are expected to be added soon.The pairing of Hancock and Washington couldn’t be more appropriate. While both come from straight jazz backgrounds, both have also made names for themselves as diverse artists whose sound appeals to a much wider audience than traditional jazz listeners. Herbie Hancock has been doing so for decades, dating back to his classic 1974 jazz-funk LP, Head Hunters. The younger Kamasi Washington has been at the forefront of the increasingly popular contemporary jazz scene since making a splash with his sprawling 2015 debut triple album, The Epic.Both Hancock and Washington have also notably collaborated with artists outside of their own stylistic realms. Washington has plenty of experience working with a wide spectrum of artists, from jam bands like The String Cheese Incident to hip-hop superstars like Kendrick Lamar. Hancock has frequently reinvented his sound to capture music’s evolution over the years. He currently tours with a band featuring seasoned jazz legends like bassist James Genus and drummer Vinnie Colaiuta, as well as buzzworthy younger artists like guitarist Lionel Loueke and Terrace Martin on sax and synths.Related: Kamasi Washington On Truth, His New EP, Working With Jam Bands & Hip-Hop Stars [Interview]Terrace Martin, in particular, is a point of connection between Herbie and Kamasi. Martin and Washington both played significant roles in crafting Kendrick Lamar’s hit 2015 LP, To Pimp A Butterfly. Now an integral part of Hancock’s band, Martin has continued to bridge the gap between the old guard and the new wave, between Herbie and Kamasi. Last year, Hancock confirmed that both Kamasi and Kendrick would be among the many contemporary collaborators from the extended hip-hop world on his highly-awaited new album, which Martin is producing.As Hancock explained to the San Diego Union-Tribune in early 2018,I’m learning a lot from the young people I’m working with … because they built the new structures, social media and that whole arena, and that affects how you get things out in front of the public to let them know you’re working on something.So I’m still learning, which I’m very happy about. I never want to stop learning. And I’m not even thinking in terms of: “I’ll do this record, get it out there, promote it, do some concerts, and then at some point I’ll work on the next record.” These days, you can put out two tracks, then something a little later that’s connected to the other two. So where you draw the line is up to the artist. It’s a new day. See below for a list of Herbie Hancock and Kamasi Washington’s upcoming co-headlining tour dates. For a full list of the artists’ dates, head to Hancock’s website here or Washington’s website here.Herbie Hancock & Kamasi Washington 2019 Co-Headlining Tour Dates7/30/19 – Vienna, VA, Wolf Trap8/4/19 – Philadelphia, PA, The Met8/6/19 – Toronto, ONT, Roy Thompson Hall8/7/19 – Huber Heights, OH, Rose Music Center at The Heights8/8/19 – Detroit, MI, Aretha Franklin Amphitheatre8/9 or 10/19 (TBC) – Chicago, IL, Huntington Bank Pavilion at Northerly Island8/14/19 – Denver, CO, The Mission Ballroom8/16/19 – Seattle, WA, Marymoor8/17/19 – Portland, OR, Oregon Zoo8/23/19 – Berkeley, CA, The Greek TheatreView Upcoming Tour Dates[H/T NPR]last_img read more


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The troubling U.S.-China face-off

first_imgAs China surpasses the United States as the world’s largest economy, flexes its might in the South and East China seas, and takes a leading role fighting climate change, it appears to be on course to challenge America’s superpower status.  Despite a seeming rapprochement over chocolate cake between China’s President Xi Jinping and President Trump in April, how the two countries navigate their strategic interests and work through China’s rise remains unclear. Is conflict inevitable when an upstart challenges a dominant power, or does history provide a road map for peaceful coexistence? Graham Allison, the Douglas Dillon Professor of Government and outgoing director of the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs at Harvard Kennedy School, calls this the defining question of the 21st century. In a new book, “Destined for War: Can America and China Escape Thucydides’ Trap?,” Allison examines the looming complications, using lessons drawn from the clashes between Sparta and Athens in ancient Greece, as well as other world conflicts. He spoke about his book and these issues in an interview.GAZETTE: How would you characterize relations between China and the United States today as compared with, say, the 1970s under President Richard Nixon?ALLISON: What most Americans still haven’t awakened to is that just in the last generation [China] has emerged like a rocket to displace the U.S. as the No. 1 producer of automobiles, computers, smartphones, and artificial intelligence. Indeed, it’s the largest economy in the world as measured by the best yardstick for comparing national economies: purchasing power parity. In the book, I illustrate this in terms of a seesaw, in which the U.S. is on one end and China is on the other. If you go back to 1990, China had about 15 percent the weight of the U.S. By 2014, China is roughly equal with the U.S., and by 2024 will be half again larger. So, just in our lifetime, a state that hardly mattered in international affairs and hardly mattered as a buyer or seller of anything has emerged as a serious rival and, in many arenas, has surpassed us.GAZETTE: Can you explain Thucydides’ Trap? What prompted you to consider U.S.-China relations through this lens, and how does it help?ALLISON: Thucydides’ Trap is the dangerous dynamic that occurs when a rising power threatens to displace a ruling power. That dynamic creates structural conditions in which events by third parties or accidents that would otherwise be inconsequential or manageable can in fact cascade to consequences that nobody wanted or could imagine. The insight comes from Thucydides in his great history of the Peloponnesian War. He wrote about the competition between the two leading city-states in classical Greece. In probably the most quoted one-liner in international relations study, he wrote, “It was the rise of Athens and the fear that this instilled in Sparta that made the war inevitable.”You’ve got two variables here: the objective condition of the rise of Power A relative to Power B, and then a subjective condition, which is the perception of that, especially by the ruling power. In the past 500 years, I’ve found there have been 16 cases in which a rising power threatens to displace a ruling power. In 12 of these, the outcome was war. In four, the outcome was not war.Think about the rise of Germany 100 years ago and the fear that this instilled in Britain. If one asks: How is it conceivable that the assassination of an archduke who would have been successor to the throne in Austria-Hungary becomes the match that lights a fire that, by its end, has burned down all of the European houses? The answer is this occurs in the context of this Thucydidean dynamic. Because it’s fearful of a rising Germany, Britain enters into entanglements which it had rigorously resisted with both Russia and France. And Germany, having only one ally, feels required to back its weakling Austrian-Hungarian empire. Otherwise it would have no allies. So an event that would have otherwise been manageable comes to create a conflagration.As I argue in the book, at the end of World War I in 1918, what happened to the things that all of the principal actors cared about most? The answer is, they had lost them. The Austrian-Hungarian emperor [“relinquish(ed) every participation in the administration of the State”] and his empire is dissolved. The Russian czar who’s backing the Serbians has been overthrown by the Bolsheviks, so he’s lost his whole regime. The Kaiser in Germany has been dismissed. The French have been bled for a whole generation. And Britain has been shorn of its treasure and its youth and turned into a debtor when before it had been a creditor. So if you’d given a chance to any of these parties for a do-over, nobody would’ve made the decisions that they made. But they were made, and that was the outcome.So the application to the case of China and the United States today is that no sane person in the U.S. government thinks a war with China is a good idea. Similarly, I don’t believe there’s anybody in China who matters who thinks a war with the U.S. is a good idea. Does that mean war cannot happen? The answer is it does not. But if we look at our histories, we discover that despite the fact that people have the right perception that a war would be catastrophic for their interests, they nonetheless may find themselves making choices in which they are prepared to tolerate risks they normally wouldn’t if they were not caught up in the grips of the dynamics of Thucydides.Take the Cuban missile crisis and its analogue unfolding today with North Korea. In the missile crisis, Kennedy was prepared to run a 1-in-3 chance of a nuclear war that could kill 100 million people to prevent the Soviet Union from placing nuclear missiles in Cuba. When he got into the middle of this crisis, and especially as he got to the end, he began to have second thoughts. I think as we watch what’s likely to happen over the next year in North Korea, we’re going to see what level of risk of a war Trump will accept to prevent North Korea from being able to launch a nuclear warhead against Los Angeles or San Francisco. I don’t believe it will be less than what Kennedy was prepared to run as a risk. And if you think about it, that’s terrifying.GAZETTE: You say the U.S. must better understand what China is trying to do. What are they trying to do, and how do we improve our understanding of them? While China is clearly an economic force, there are other dimensions — cultural, political, social, leadership — that comprise what it means to be a superpower.ALLISON: Absolutely. We should imagine that President Xi and his colleagues are similar to Teddy Roosevelt and his colleagues when the U.S. was supremely confident it was going to be the “American Century.” Teddy Roosevelt, as I describe in the book — a Harvard graduate, one of my heroes, 37 years old — becomes the No. 2 civilian in the Navy. That’s in 1897. He’s been writing that it makes no sense whatsoever to have these foreigners in our hemisphere, especially offended by the Spanish who are controlling Cuba. So in the decade that follows his becoming the assistant secretary of the Navy, we fight a war with Spain, we liberate Cuba, we take Puerto Rico, we get Guam as a spoil of war, and the Philippines. Second, we support and sponsor a coup in Colombia that creates a new country, Panama, that gives us a contract for the canal that we want to build. We threaten war with Britain and then secondly with Germany unless they’ll butt out of territorial disputes in Venezuela, and we ultimately steal the biggest part of the tail of Alaska from Canada, and that’s just for starters.And we announce, as Teddy does, the Roosevelt Corollary to the Monroe Doctrine. The corollary says if any nation in our hemisphere behaves in ways we don’t like, we will send the Marines and change the government. And we send the Marines once a year every year that follows while he’s there. From the Chinese perspective, what is the name of the sea that’s adjacent to its border? It’s called the South China Sea. It’s not called the American Sea; it’s not called the Asian Sea; it’s not called the International Sea. And this other one is called the East China Sea. When they look out at these waters adjacent to their border, they think it’s as strange and anomalous to see the American Navy as the arbiter of what happens there as Teddy Roosevelt thought it was for the Spanish to be in Cuba.They aspire to the normal aspirations of a rising power in the Thucydidean story. A rising power thinks “I’m bigger, I’m stronger, so I deserve more say, and I deserve more sway, and my interests deserve to matter more. And the arrangements that I’ve inherited from a previous condition in which I used to be small and weak are unfair and were unreasonable, so they need to be adapted.” When we tell them, “Wait a minute, this is the rules-based international order that’s allowed you to emerge. You would never have emerged if it hadn’t been for what we’ve provided in the way of security and economic order,” that’s what’s under the surface of events happening in the South China Sea and also in the Korea peninsula.GAZETTE: China is not without its own growing pains. I wonder whether the fact that major economic and cultural changes are hitting China so quickly may hinder its growth and strength. It’s something they’ve never dealt with, so there’s no history to fall back upon. Meanwhile, the U.S. has 240 years of a mostly stable economic and political system, which is a decided structural advantage. Are we perhaps overstating China’s rise much like we did with Japan in the ’80s?ALLISON: They’re completely shell-shocked by how fantastically their world has changed in such a short period of time. Now of course, our world has changed hugely, too. This book is not pessimistic or fatalistic in any way, but I think it’s essential to recognize the inherent and inescapable risks — extreme risks — in this structural condition.China has fantastic problems at home, and the U.S. has fantastic problems at home. The Chinese are trying to run six revolutions at the same time. They’ve got their population problem. They’ve got, as you say, no established institutions, so they’ve got no constitutional framework. There are lots of reasons for thinking that they could find themselves in trouble. But of course, that’s been true five years ago, 10 years ago, 15 years ago, 20 years ago. My gut tells me that we should not count on them derailing themselves. We should count on them continuing along this path, and we should expect their behavior to look like what I call the “rising power syndrome.” The emanations from it, I think, give us a pretty good clue to how they think about “one belt, one road,” or what should happen in the South China Sea, or who should be calling the tune with development assistance, particularly as the U.S. exits some of these arenas, putting together a trade agreement in Asia, which I think they will succeed in doing. Or even, as at the Davos discussions, declaring themselves to be the leader in trying to deal with the climate problem. To whatever extent we back off or back down and leave vacuums or empty space, maybe they’ll overstretch and overpromise. But they’re there.GAZETTE: Despite Thucydides’ Trap, you say war between China and the U.S. is not inevitable. Why?ALLISON: There’s no reason why it’s necessary to make the mistakes that gave us World War I or that produced a number of the other examples. I try to draw 12 lessons for peace, both from the failures and from the successes. No. 1: Learn from the past. No. 2: Analyze the situation just like you were taking a very high-level strategic perspective. So it is the case that the overwhelming problems for China lie at home. And it is the case that the overwhelming problems for the Americans lie at home. Is it impossible to imagine people having a sense of priorities? No, it’s not. It’s hard, but not impossible. Third, look at the problems that we’re not able to solve unilaterally, that can only be solved if we act cooperatively. Climate is a dramatic example. You can’t solve the problem by yourself. This has to be done either collectively among the big guys, of which China and the U.S. are the two leaders, or it fails. That’s why the Paris Accord was so significant. So there are areas in which cooperation is necessary for our selfish objectives. Climate is a dramatic case, but I think the same thing is in avoiding a nuclear war between the U.S. and China.Next, for the areas where we have competing interests, can we imagine adjusting things that we’ve become accustomed to, but are not necessary? I call this distinguishing between the vital and the vivid. Can we take account of what’s vital for American well-being and then figure out what other things are maybe important but less important? If we’re to manage the problem that’s emerging in the Korean peninsula, will we have to adjust some of the things that we’ve taken for granted? I think we will. Is compromise a bad idea? In politics, maybe so, but not in the real world and not in strategy.Diplomacy will be of the essence. This has to do with the way the governments relate to each other, the way the parties understand each other, the level of even trust in the sense of predictable expectations. I think it’s a challenge, but it’s not a challenge all that much more difficult than in the period after World War II and especially in the late ’50s, ’60s, and ’70s when it looked like the Soviet Union was going to surpass the United States. My hope about the book is that we’ll recognize the extreme risks and then we will understand that we need to have a strategic imagination proportionate to the risk.This interview has been edited for clarity and length.last_img read more


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Before entrepreneurial culture became a thing

first_imgAs the former managing director of a store with three locations, Harvard College junior Jenny Leight can easily list things she’s learned about running a multimillion-dollar business.Among them: Make sure the hooks on clothes hangers are faced to look like question marks, because that’s the “correct” direction, and it makes it easier for customers to take them off the rack. Others? Put your best or newest merchandise in areas where customers tend to stop first or most often.  Don’t be afraid to put up flashy “instagrammable” window displays to draw passersby. Make your staffers feel appreciated, supported, and accountable if you want to motivate them to meet store goals.Perhaps most importantly, however, Leight can tell you this: From the small details to big-picture strategy, starting and running a business is something that can be learned.“I now feel I have the skills to look at a business, especially in retail, and figure out: Who are their customers? Are they targeting the right customer? How are they targeting their customers? Are their products set at the right price? And can they do anything to [improve] their customer experience?” said Leight, who for the past two years oversaw one of Harvard Square’s most recognizable retail businesses, The Harvard Shop.In short, she said, it was an experience that gave her the kind of hands-on business experience she’s wanted since starting at Harvard. It was made possible by the Harvard Student Agencies, a student organization that for the past 60 years has given more than 5,000 students similar types of business, professional, and entrepreneurial exposure.HSA calls itself as the largest student-run company in the world, but it is probably more accurately described as a conglomerate that also has incubated startups. The registered 501c(3) nonprofit employs almost 700 students (making it the second-largest employer on campus besides the University) and currently is made up of 12 “agencies” — although it has attempted more than 70  — that run across a number of industries.,Ventures include well-known fixtures like HSA Cleaners and Dorm Essentials, which have been providing laundry, dry cleaning, and micro-fridges to the campus community since the organization’s earliest days, and spots like The Harvard Shop, which sells University-branded merchandise both in-store and online. Other outlets, which have been added over the years, include services like publishing, bartending, delivery, tutoring, advertising, market research, and web development.The agencies are all run as individual businesses, with HSA’s corporate office acting as an umbrella. They employ students year-round, sometimes on a full-time basis, and each has its own team of managers and employees who are responsible for all operational and strategic aspects, including budgeting, invoicing, stocking shelves, writing content or code, hiring and managing staff, and setting revenue goals. For many students it’s where they first learn to craft professional emails, collaborate with others, and problem-solve in a work environment.“You have complete ownership over your role, whether you’re at the senior management level or you’re a marketing manager,” said Leight, a psychology and economics concentrator who joined HSA as a first-year and found that she enjoyed negotiating with vendors, behind-the-scenes logistics, and the strategy that goes into keeping it afloat and driving it forward. “It’s a lot of big-picture-type thinking,” she said. It’s all about “working with the team to identify problems or areas that could use improvement and then brainstorming solutions and implementing them.”Altogether, HSA’s subsidiaries bring in more than $7 million in annual revenue and pay out more than $1 million in student wages. Its corporate office at Burke-McCoy Hall, like the rest of the organization, is also primarily student-run, with a handful of professional staff. HSA is guided by a 26-person board of directors, who include alumni, University administrators, and students like Leight.The non-student professionals and administrators mainly serve as advisers and mentors and keep institutional knowledge intact, said HSA chief executive and general manager Jim McKellar. “I’d rather them make mistakes here, where they have a soft landing and a good support system, than make that same mistake at Goldman Sachs or when they are starting their own business.” — Jim McKellar, HSA chief executive “We say it’s a student-run company, and it really is,” McKellar said. “The students make the decisions, but the five of us [and board administrators] are here to teach the students. We teach them everything from reading a balance sheet to running a meeting. We’re here as a support system.”This teaching and coaching structure plays well into HSA’s primary goal of giving members real-world experience that can help them in future careers, and is part of what makes HSA so fun and challenging for students. “It’s an intense place to work because students have full ownership,” said James Swingos ’20, HSA’s outgoing president. He has held the post since last February, and before that had helped it acquire one of its most recent ventures, a market-research business called Campus Insights.Being entrepreneurial is key to the HSA experience. In fact, the organization is always searching for ways to expand current businesses by adding new services to them, or to start or acquire new ones. These often come as a result of market research on what businesses or services are needed and the kinds of experience students want.The past few years, for instance, HSA has added agencies in the technology sector after market research showed there was a need for these types of services in the community and that undergraduates wanted experience in the field. Among the agencies added were Campus Insights, which was purchased in 2018 from two college students at Boston College and the University of Michigan, and HSA DEV, a web and app development company, which it started in 2017.To get each firm launched or acquired, students crafted business plans, forecasted budgets, and presented their work to the HSA board of directors for approval.“The board evaluates the student opportunities — how many students will this new business support, what kind of experience will they be receiving, [and] what kind of personal and professional growth opportunities exist for them,” McKellar said. Companies then have a year or two to become profitable, he added.Both HSA DEV and Campus Insights have made steady progress. DEV is now finishing its third full year, is budgeted to break even, and continues to grow, while Campus Insights made a profit its first year and broke even the next.“The skill set [for taking on new businesses] is really different,” said Swingos, who had to integrate Campus Insights into HSA and build his team from the ground up. “You have to think about operational buildout … customer development … marketing. You have to think from the bottom up, ‘What is the purpose of my product, why is it valuable?’ You’re the first person to think of why this is important to customers.”Students join HSA for a variety of reasons. Some want to get managerial experience. Some want professional work experience as web designers at HSA’s development and design firm, tutors at its academic tutoring firm, or even as writers and editors at its Let’s Go travel publications. Not to be forgotten are students who just want to earn some extra spending money working as a cashier or mailbox stuffer.Whatever the reason, HSA helps students get where they want to get professionally, or helps them discover where that is, Swingos said. Sometimes both. Take Akanksha Sah ’21, who at first was in it for the cash but is now the incoming president.Sah took a post her first year as a business development manager at Campus Insights, a user research firm focused on Gen Zs and millennials. At the time she planned to stay in the role just for the school year to help her mother pay rent, and then take an internship at a law firm during the summer to stay on a more traditional prelaw track. But after her decisions led to tangible changes and the ability to steer the course of business, she determined she wouldn’t get this type of experience anywhere as an intern, so she decided to stay on for the summer and then fully committed to it for the rest of her undergraduate career.“HSA gives you skills that you can definitely apply in any situation,” said Sah. “So even if I wasn’t doing a traditional prelaw internship, it’s not like I wasn’t gaining skills that would help in law school.” “It’s an intense place to work because students have full ownership.” — James Swingos ’20 In fact, it’s that ability to step almost immediately into high-level positions, make decisions, and even take risks that makes HSA competitive with typical internships. “That value proposition is really about a person who really wants to be highly integrated with something they can really change, that makes real revenue, that does real business, and has real clients,” Swingos said. Also, it “gets freshmen managers and sophomore managers all the time. We take people with no experience, train them, put them in those positions, and help them grow and make sure it’s safe.”Training usually takes place over a semester and is done by whoever is in the role at the time. Swingos, for instance, spent the fall semester training Sah. Leight spent that time training her own successor, while first-year Raymond Qin spent the semester training to become the operations manager for Cleaners and Dorm Essentials.Because of HSA’s focus on learning, the organization never loses sight of the fact that its students will inevitably make mistakes. In fact, McKellar says he welcomes it.“I’d rather them make mistakes here, where they have a soft landing and a good support system, than make that same mistake at Goldman Sachs or when they are starting their own business,” he said. “It’s a good teaching and learning environment.”While most mistakes are on the smaller side, like forgetting to pay an invoice or botching a meeting, some can be costly. One of the biggest was brought to light in February 2018, when the Massachusetts Attorney General’s Office found that HSA had violated state labor laws and owed employees more than $46,000 in unpaid wages. The issue came from The Harvard Shop, which had not been paying its employees time and a half on Sundays or for overtime.“When we learned of our mistake, we [the students and full-time staff ] voluntarily corrected the issue immediately to the satisfaction of the Massachusetts Attorney General and worked with our legal counsel to enact new employee policies to ensure that we were in compliance with the law,” McKellar said. “It was a terrific, and real-world, learning experience for the students. They realized that HSA is not just a student organization. It’s a group of real businesses, and we need to follow all of the state and federal laws.”Founded in 1957, HSA started after University officials discovered students running small-scale businesses out of their dorm rooms, which put Harvard’s real estate tax exemption at risk. To keep both the jobs these businesses had created and the University’s tax exemption, Jon Monro ’35, dean of financial aid at the time, and Dustin M. Burke ’52, then-director of student employment, incorporated the businesses under the umbrella Harvard Student Agencies and made it a student organization.Over the years, HSA has attempted more than 70 agencies, posted more than $146 million in revenue, paid more than $50 million in student wages, and gained more than 4,000 alumni — a number of whom have gone on to notable success.For example, Darren Aronofsky ’91, an Oscar-nominated director and screenwriter best known for “Black Swan” and “Requiem for a Dream,” was a writer at Let’s Go. Deval Patrick ’78, J.D. ’82, former Massachusetts governor and 2020 presidential candidate, used to work at the bartending service and was a member of the student board. And Ken Powell ’76, former chairman of General Mills, and Andrea Silbert ’86, M.B.A./M.P.A ’92, president of the EOS Foundation, are both former HSA presidents.As its alumni network has grown, more recent alumni have formed an HSA alumni graduate board, which helps them keep in touch with what’s happening at HSA and mentor and connect current students with externships.For Swingos, who will become part of that network in May, it all shows the impact HSA has had on students and will continue to have on its next batch of managers.“At the end of the day, it’s about creating as many undergraduate campus jobs as possible” and having those roles provide students with skills like teamwork, leadership, and accountability, Swingos said.last_img read more


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Colstrip Operator Talen Energy Wants Out

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享From KTVQ Helena:The operator of the four coal-fired power plants at Colstrip told plant owners Monday it plans to exit as operator within two years, MTN News has learned.State Sens. Jim Keane and Duane Ankney confirmed Monday they’d been told Talen Energy of Allentown, Pa., informed the plants’ utility owners that it no longer wants to operate the power plants in southeastern Montana.Ankney, of Colstrip, also said Talen has asked to “expedite” its request to expedite as plant operator, and possibly quit its role earlier than two years.“What the owners have to do is figure out what they’re going to do, if someone within the owner group is going to step up as operators,” he told MTN News.News of Talen’s exit is the latest in a string of negative developments for the Colstrip power plants, which employ 360 people and generate up to 2,000 megawatts of power consumed throughout Montana and the West.Talen, which also owns part of Colstrip 1 and 2 and sells Colstrip-generated power on the wholesale market, told state officials earlier this month it is losing money on the plants and has been trying to sell its interest.Environmentalists have targeted the plants as a major emitter of greenhouse gases, arguing for their eventual closure.State legislatures in Oregon and Washington this year also passed bills that are designed to hasten or make it easier for utilities in those states to stop providing coal-fired power from the Colstrip plants.Full article: Colstrip, MT power-plant operator plans to quit in two years Colstrip Operator Talen Energy Wants Outlast_img read more


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The richness of Croatian tradition needs to be capitalized into finished products

first_imgAlthough we have long since entered the summer, judging by the high temperatures, the calendar is still at our door.The beginning of summer is marked by the traditional lighting of St. John’s bonfires. The shortest night of the year, June 24, has fueled the imagination of the human species since the Early Stone Age. Among Croats, of course, this pre-Christian custom is associated with the so-called natural holidays (equinoxes and solstices), and is part of a much wider fascination with the sun encountered throughout Europe. In the ancient Slavs, this event was associated with a deity named Jarilo or Jarovit in some sources who, in order to maintain the harmony of the seasons, must cross the entire tree of the world. During the summer solstice, Jarilo comes to Perun’s mansions on top of a tree where he meets his daughter Mara. Midsummer Night is therefore the night of their wedding.With the arrival of Christianity, the period of adaptation of theology into pagan beliefs began, and so the spring Jaril was replaced by St. Juraj, and the summer St. John the Baptist.The lighting of bonfires is a custom on other holidays such as St. George’s Day, Vidovdan, Ilindan, St. Peter and Paul as a relic of the Sun cult that is symbolically always associated with heavenly fire.From an ethnological point of view, this custom exists on the margins of tradition, but has been actively maintained in the area of ​​Pokuplje, along the banks of the river Kupa and along the Cetina in Dalmatia. Also, as an organized event, it is celebrated in Karlovac, Požega, Đakovo, Donja Stubica and others.”The sun is imitated by the bonfire and announces summer as the most fertile season, calling for a good harvest of ripe grain. The bonfires are thus becoming a symbol of Karlovac’s boatmen who have been developing the grain trade with the Cup for centuries “, point out the Tourist Board of the City of Karlovac, whose last year’s edition of summer greetings was visited by about ten thousand Karlovac citizens and guests.From the given cultural pattern, the people of Karlovac capitalized on the all-day event and offered a rich sports and entertainment program to the visitors. With unavoidable concerts, fireworks and, of course, bonfires at several attractive locations in the city, visitors can expect football matches, street performers and folk games – packed into a story that balances between history and fiction.Photo: TZ KarlovacAt the same time, at the other end of the continent, more than 25.000 people admired the sunrise on an ancient prehistoric monument. The difference from the previous example is that gathered druids and sun worshipers seemingly gather on their own initiative around the ancient stone circle in Stonehenge and by beating drums, singing and dancing, these self-proclaimed pagans make an attraction that can be very independent.Whether organized in some production sense or not, this pronounced spontaneity leaves the impression of an active, relevant gathering place as opposed to the loneliness of a historical monument. Needless to say, how much such access to the place, also maps on the tourist map of the country and makes it world famous.The question is what exactly is the brake in the Croatian case when it comes to the capitalization of traditional elements (with an emphasis on pagan sources)? Lack of motivation or simply we have not outgrown the dogma that some third instance must organize something for us to have fun?In any case, the fact remains that there is no lack of material in Croatia, nor a desire for cultural patterns to survive, but for a place or in this case a custom to become vibrant, they must have a present value in community life. In other words, become a part of it because the real tourist value is not given to a place that has an attraction, but is only part of the attraction in line with its local tradition and culture. These are efforts that depend on the synergy of the entire population, not a handful of organizers.Ultimately, the efforts made can only result in an increase in the rating on the tourist map, economic profits and an increase in standards.Fortunately, the example of St. John’s bonfires shows that we are on the right track.last_img read more


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Antoino Rudiger claims Chelsea will miss Arsenal transfer target Willian if he leaves

first_imgAdvertisement Willian did not make the Chelsea squad for Saturday’s FA Cup final defeat against Arsenal (Picture: Getty)He said: ‘Since day one of coming to Chelsea, he and David Luiz got me into the team and helped me out in the first couple of months because it was not that easy.‘He is a great guy and a really, really good footballer. He is calm and humble and it will be sad if I don’t see him again as a team-mate. He is not the type of player who talks that much.‘He does his thing on the pitch, just like Eden Hazard. By playing, he shows what he is about. He is a guy who dictates the game and not many players in the world have this type of quality.‘He is always training [hard] and practicing free-kicks after. He is someone who always wants to improve.’Chelsea have already offset Willian’s likely exit by securing deals for Hakim Ziyech and Timo Werner, while Kai Havertz is primed to arrive later this month and Rudiger is confident the future is bright under Frank Lampard.More: Arsenal FCArsenal flop Denis Suarez delivers verdict on Thomas Partey and Lucas Torreira movesThomas Partey debut? Ian Wright picks his Arsenal starting XI vs Manchester CityArsene Wenger explains why Mikel Arteta is ‘lucky’ to be managing ArsenalHe added: ‘To be honest, he is not like [Antonio] Conte or someone who, when you lose games, will rant at you. Of course, the coach is a bit quieter in the way that he says things. But the most important thing is that he gets to the point, and he does.‘We are all grown men and everyone can hear what the coach has said. I think he dealt very well with that pressure and kept us alive. Even if it went good or bad, he always kept us alive.‘For me, it is about the human being I am talking too. It is not only because someone wins titles. Of course, it can help because he is an open-minded coach and you can ask him about the times when he was playing.‘He knows the pressure and what the people want to see at this club. He knows about those pressure games, finals and everything.’AdvertisementAdvertisementMORE: Sergio Reguilon wants Chelsea transfer after ‘advanced talks’ with Real Madrid defenderMORE: Matthias Ginter responds to Chelsea transfer speculationFollow Metro Sport across our social channels, on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.For more stories like this, check our sport page. Advertisement Comment Antoino Rudiger claims Chelsea will miss Arsenal transfer target Willian if he leaves Metro Sport ReporterWednesday 5 Aug 2020 12:20 pmShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link7.2kShares Willian appears destined to leave Chelsea with Arsenal his likely destination (Picture: Getty)Willian would represent a big miss for Chelsea if he leaves the club this summer, according to his current team-mate Antonio Rudiger.The experienced Brazil international has enjoyed a productive season under Frank Lampard, but his seven-year stint in west London looks destined to end imminently amid a protracted contract wrangle. Willian, whose current deal is set to expire imminently, is holding out for the offer of a three-year contract but Chelsea are unlikely to cave to his demands. Arsenal are reported to be at the head of the queue to sign the winger and although their contract offer is said not to be as lucrative as the terms other clubs are prepared to offer, including the likes of Inter Miami, the 31-year-old has his heart set on a move to the FA Cup holders. AdvertisementAdvertisementADVERTISEMENTRudiger, who played in last Saturday’s defeat at Wembley against the Gunners while Willian failed to make the squad, fears Chelsea are losing a player whose influence on the pitch is matched by the impact he makes off it. last_img read more


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Rodgers: Mario must be consistent

first_imgLiverpool manager Brendan Rodgers believes Mario Balotelli has some way to go before he can be considered in the same class as Luis Suarez. Italy international Balotelli joined the club in the summer from AC Milan to replace Suarez, who moved to Barcelona. The 24-year-old has scored once in five appearances for a Liverpool side who have struggled to replicate their form from last season. And asked if Balotelli was the right man to replace the Uruguayan who netted 31 times last season, Rodgers said “We shall see. “There is no comparison between the two as players. Luis was brilliant for me in his time here and developed to become a player who consistently delivered in terms of scoring and creating. “Mario is different. He’s got a lot of experience for 24, he has come here as an established international.” And for Rodgers, consistency is the key for Balotelli if he is to be as big a player for the Reds as Suarez was. “Suarez elevated himself, that was clear,” he told national newspapers. “He wasn’t world class when he came in but when he left to go to Barcelona he had put himself in that bracket. “He did that because of his consistency in scoring goals and keeping his performance level high. World class is about being at the highest level consistently, being at that level in your game consistently. That’s what takes you there. “I think Mario is potentially world class. You can’t compare Suarez and him, but Mario is coming in as an international striker and he’s a talent, no doubt.” center_img Press Associationlast_img read more


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Todd McNair granted new trial in case against NCAA

first_imgLast May, a jury sided with the NCAA, stating that the allegations brought against McNair were not defamatory. However, Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge Frederick Shaller wrote in a ruling Wednesday morning that the jury’s decision was not supported by sufficient evidence, specifically citing an incorrect answer in a special jury verdict question meant to draw a certain answer. Moreover, the presiding juror, Anthony Bruno, should not have been allowed to serve due to an implicit bias, Shaller said. Bruno is a member of the Latham & Watkins law firm, which was a part of the NCAA’s legal team on the McNair case. However, Bruno had no relation to or role in the case and worked at a different branch of the firm from those involved. A week ago, McNair agreed to become the running backs coach for the Tampa Bay Buccaneers. McNair has not coached at the collegiate or professional level since leaving USC in 2009. “Permitting Juror No. 2 to remain on the jury and participate in deliberations … resulted a miscarriage of justice and in [the] Plaintiff being deprived of a fair trial,” Shaller said. center_img Former USC assistant football coach Todd McNair was granted a motion for a new trial in his defamation lawsuit against the NCAA Wednesday. The suit has been ongoing since 2011, after the NCAA’s Committee on Infractions brought allegations in 2010 stating that McNair was involved in the Reggie Bush scandal. The NCAA found that Bush, a former USC running back, had received impermissible benefits while at USC, and he had to forfeit his Heisman trophy while the program vacated the 14 wins and national title from the 2004 season. “In the court’s judgment, no reasonable trier of fact could have made the determination that the answer to Special Verdict Question 3 should be ‘NO,’” Shaller said in the ruling.last_img read more


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Brown to face the world number one

first_imgAllen has beaten China’s Zhao Xintong by 6-frames to 2. While Brown faces the daunting prospect of the reigning world champion Stuart Bingham in the afternoon session.last_img