June 2021

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England attack coach Brian Smith resigns

first_img“Johno appointed me and gave me the opportunity, and that’s something I will be forever grateful for. He has been fantastic to work for and has always given 100 per cent and maintained the utmost integrity. Working with the other coaches has also been a positive experience and I wish them all well.”Martin Johnson said: “Brian has brought a high level of coaching and a huge amount of commitment and passion to the job. If you look at our record in the last 12 months, and the fact that we have scored 37 tries to 12 conceded, it shows what an impact he has made. I want to thank him for what he has done for the England team and for the young players that he has brought on.” Brian Smith leaves his job as England attack coachBrian Smith today stood down from his position as England attack coach.Smith was appointed in July 2008 and has decided not to seek a renewal of his contract.He said: “I feel that England have made great strides in the last three years and although the World Cup was a massive disappointment, we have won 10 out of the last 13 games, including beating Australia back-to-back and winning the RBS 6 Nations for the first time since 2003. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img BAGSHOT, ENGLAND – OCTOBER 27: Brian Smith, the England attack coach looks on during the England training session at Pennyhill Park Hotel on October 27, 2010 in Bagshot, England. (Photo by David Rogers/Getty Images)last_img read more


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The sweetest of victories for England in Paris

first_img Manu Tuilagi scored a long-range tryBy Ben ColesBEFORE THE satisfaction should come the analysis. England scored three fantastic tries away in Paris, showing the attacking flair that the squad have always felt was within them, but which the public had yet to see.This 24-22 win did not come easily. Compounded by ill-discipline at the breakdown, against a French scrum that forced penalties as much as it gave them away, no passage of this match was ever easy. This triumph came through every single one of England’s 111 tackles. France’s power at the breakdown was more often than not illegal and unpunished, whilst England were no angels either.Despite the patches of individual brilliance, the game was marred by errors from both sides. They shared between them 20 handling errors, from forcing passes that were not on. The fact that Wesley Fofana and Charlie Sharples were both penalised for deliberate knock-ons highlighted the speed of both defences and also the level of risk in the majority of passes. Chris Ashton’s petulance and the penalties at the scrum all hurt England when they needed to remain composed.But so rarely for an English performance in the Lancaster era, the positives outweigh the negatives. Owen Farrell’s options were not always perfect, at times kicking aimlessly, but his defence was outstanding. He also played such a crucial role in the build-up to Manu Tuilagi’s try, seizing the turnover ball. Certainly there were moments where he looked to be indecisive, but in the long term it is all part of his gradual growth as an international No 10. NOT FOR FEATURED. PARIS, FRANCE – MARCH 11: Phil Dowson of England makes a try saving tackle from Wesley Fofana of France during the RBS 6 Nations match between France and England at Stade de France on March 11, 2012 in Paris, France. (Photo by David Rogers/Getty Images) Moving on from Sunday’s success, the overwhelming clamour from the voices of supporters and across Twitter and message boards for Lancaster to get the England job full-time is hard to ignore. Winning in Paris though is a difficult achievement for any coach, let alone one so new to the international game.Defeat Ireland next weekend and under Lancaster’s tenure, England will have won four out of five matches. The position of the RFU board is currently an unenviable one. Damned if they back the coach who has left fans and players ecstatic. Damned if they don’t and bring in the experience desired by pundits of Nick Mallett. England’s win in Paris has made the outcome all the more uncertain. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Ben Morgan’s run and offload were terrificWhilst the scrum may have conceded three penalties, it also created two crucial ones of its own. The lineout had a success rate of 72%, despite the threat of Imanol Harinordoquy in the air. Top of the pile though comes the quality of England’s tries. Tuilagi showed that he is not all about power, having the pace to finish off crucial chances. Ben Morgan’s rampaging burst could become iconic for the new England. To first fend off Thierry Dusautoir, before that offload, whilst being smothered by Harinordoquy, was a world class touch.Perhaps Tom Croft’s decisive score though is the pick of the bunch. Maligned for his understated performances in recent games, there is no better way to thrust yourself back into the limelight than by grabbing the glory at the Stade de France. As magnificent as his try was, his work at the ruck and also along with Geoff Parling in the lineout was exceptional. It rolled back the years to arguably his greatest year in 2009, when he took not only the Aviva Premiership but also the Lions tour to South Africa by storm.Phil Dowson made a brave try-saving tackleStuart Lancaster must also receive credit for his substitutions. With Morgan not playing with the same momentum on 60 minutes, his fitness remaining a concern, Phil Dowson’s substitution looked like a gamble. Yet the commitment in his try-saving tackle on Fofana made sure it paid off, Dowson taking a stamp in the face for his troubles.last_img read more


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Rugby World – April 2013 edition contents

first_imgPro’s Playbook – Ex-England coach Brian Ashton delivers a few attacking movesMini Rugby – Putting the ball in at a scrumSave Your Season – Kettering get a training session from Leicester. Plus, diet tipsStephen Jones – Johnny Sexton is right to leave Ireland, argues our columnistHambo meets… Leicester’s Richard Cockerill enjoys a no-holds-barred chat‘Fijigate’ – Take the cash or play for your country? That’s the shocking choice that many players face so we investigate the big issueEuro special – The Heineken Cup quarters…Lee Bryne – Clermont v MontpellierWill Fraser – Saracens v UlsterJames Downey – Harlequins v MunsterAndy Sheridan – Toulon v LeicesterChallenge Cup – A focus on the Amlin quartersWelsh Derbies – East versus West — we preview regional derby day in CardiffGeorge Gregan – The Wallaby legend looks ahead to the Lions seriesBacks…Club section – News from around the countrySchools – Who’s starring for your school?Essentials – The latest books and productsUncovered – Kelly Brown talks stammers, singing and leading ScotlandTour Tale – Do tequila and rugby mix? Read this story to find out———————————————————————————————————————————————–Click here to subscribe to Rugby World [imagebrowser id=35]THE NEW issue of Rugby World is packed with Six Nations stars, including Joe Launchbury, Brian O’Driscoll, Leigh Halfpenny, Jim Hamilton, Mike Brown and Justin Tipuric. Will Carling gives us his verdict on England’s Grand Slam bid and we go behind the scenes at an Ireland training session – all in all it’s the perfect accompaniment to the final rounds of an exciting championship.On top of all the Six Nations features, we look ahead to the Heineken Cup and Amlin Challenge Cup quarter-finals with the likes of Andrew Sheridan, Lee Byrne and Will Fraser, and focus on the Welsh derby double header at the Millennium Stadium in late March. Former England coach Brian Ashton provides three attacking moves and Matt Hampson interviews Richard Cockerill, so there’s something for everyone!———————————————————————————————————————————————–Front Row…England’s Grand Slam bidWin a box in Cardiff,30 minutes with Geoff ParlingSevens and LionsCraig Chalmers – The ex-Scotland fly-half on the influence of Scott JohnsonBen Foden – The No 15 on Red Nose Day and England’s strength in depthShane Williams – Wales can spoil England’s party, says the legendary wingSpotlights…Mike Brown – The England man tells Sarah Mockford how he’s finding the move from full-back to wingRory Best – He’d love to stay in the shadows but the Wales flanker has the talent to shine, says Owain JonesMatt Scott – The Scotland centre is on a steep learning curve, writes Alan Dymock, but you wouldn’t know itJustin Tipuric – The Ireland hooker is in good shape after his injury lay-off. Gavin Mortimer reportsCentres…Joe Launchbury – From shelf-stacker to Test star — the England lock’s journeyBrian O’Driscoll – Ireland’s centre talks touring Australia with the LionsJim Hamilton – The Scot on moving to France, winning again and leadershipLeigh Halfpenny – The Wales full-back takes us back to where it all startedPro Insight – Find out how Ireland’s stars warm up for training sessionsRugby Fitness – How to step up your regime You can also download the issue onto your iPad or iPad MiniOr perhaps you’d like a digital version of the magazine delivered direct to your PC or android device? If so click here.center_img LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more


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Conor Murray on his team-mates

first_imgWe caught up with the Munster, Ireland and Lions scrum-half to ask him to give us the inside track on his team-mates. Here’s what he came up with… LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS RW: Best and taste in music? CM: Felix Jones is pretty good and I roomed with him in Argentina a few weeks ago. He likes traditional Irish music.Paulie (Paul O’Connell) is terrible. In the gym at home in Limerick, if there’s a delay in the music, Zeebs (Simon Zebo), Tommy O’Donnell and I will look over and see him going for his gear bag, and then we know we’re in trouble. He likes old music, it really shows his age. Top champs: Murray celebrates with O’Connell, McFadden and Sean CroninRW: Who’s the vainest? CM: Again that’s got to be Killer, especially for a prop. When it suits him his hygiene levels are pretty good and he can dress up, but I live round the corner from him and I know for a fact that he has a good few lazy days too.RW: Best/worst person to follow on Twitter? CM: That’s got to be Fergus (McFadden). He doesn’t tweet all the time, but when he does he’s pretty funny. Team talk: Murray (centre) and his team-mates on a down day in Argentina. Pic: Dan Sheridan/Inpho Rugby World: Who’s the best and worst dressed?Conor Murray: The best has got to be Dave Kearney. I’d say it’s widely known that he’s one of the more stylish lads in the Irish squad.The worst is Killer (Dave Kilcoyne). He bought some white jeans in Argentina, and also asked me to cut his hair. He wanted a style called a fade, and I told him ‘I can’t do that’ but he just said have a go. Hopefully he didn’t look too bad afterwards!  Killer’s bad again! He just tweets things that no one really cares about, and isn’t very adventurous, like what he’s eating for a midnight snack.RW: Best and worst dancer? CM: It kills me to say it, but Zebo is class. And the worst is definitely Mike Ross. His style is kind of like an old dad at a wedding.RW: Best/worst roomy? CM: Felix was pretty good to be fair, although he did steal my laptop charger a few times when I was in the middle of watching something. The worst… well I’ve never roomed with him myself, but apparently Rodney Ah You is a terrible snorer!Check out this video of Paddy Jackson and Simon Zebo rapping http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fs8x-qk8E2olast_img read more


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Summer Tests: Lions XV picked on form

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS TAGS: Highlight Last time out: George North leads the celebrations as Australia are beaten We have gone for a 6-2 split here, as England did against the Australians, as we are take the All Blacks on up front and will need the cavalry to come charging on in the second half. George is unlucky he plays in the same position as his national captain whilst McGrath and Nel will keep the pressure on at scrum-time whilst Lawes covers back and second row and has been revitalised.Close call: Rhys Webb is very close to a starting spot for the LionsJones is world-class and CJ Stander gets the vote ahead of Jack Clifford. Rhys Webb is unlucky not to start and with only one spot left on the bench Daly covers all the other bases despite just nine minutes of action in Australia. The Summer Tests pitted North v South, with England’s players doing themselves no harm in selection for the 2017 Lions tour, here’s our picks based on form… Hooker – Dylan Hartley (England, captain)You would have got decent odds about Hartley playing for England again after he missed the World Cup but was given the national captaincy and has helped revive the set-piece. Throws in well, scrums well and that is what good hookers do, everything else is froth. Tough, abrasive and an absolute revelation as captain to anyone unfamiliar with his stint in the job at Northampton.Good talker: Dylan Hartley has been a huge success as England captainLocks – Maro Itoje (England) and Iain Henderson (Ireland)Tough on Alun Wyn Jones and George Kruis, but Itoje and Henderson were the outstanding locks in the summer Tests. One day in the future Itoje might have a bad game but it might not be anytime soon and Henderson was massive when the chips were down and Ireland were reduced to 13 and 14 men in their first Test win in Cape Town over the Boks. Plenty of contenders here, with Jonny Gray not far away.Force of nature: Iain Henderson is maturing into one of Europe’s Premier locksFlankers – James Haskell (England) and Chris Robshaw (England)Striking whilst the iron is hot with these two – the game is tomorrow, remember – who are in the form of their lives and invigorated under Jones. Haskell, who says the closest he has been to the Lions is London Zoo, was England’s best player, at seven, in the first two Test matches against Australia and Robshaw has been a revelation since copping it after the World Cup. Sam Warburton and Sean O’Brien are sure to be in the frame in a year’s time but these two will do for now.Number 8 – Billy Vunipola (England)The fight for the No.8 shirt in New Zealand next year between Vunipola and the ultra-consistent Taulupe Faletau will be one of the match-ups of the tour but Big Billy gets first dibs here after an astonishing season. Jones made him a vice-captain, told him he was an 80-minute player and got him fit enough to be one. Left a trail of destruction from Edinburgh to Sydney.Power play: Billy Vunipola’s ballast from the off could see him nudge Taulupe FaletauReplacements benchJamie George (England), Jack McGrath (Ireland), WP Nel (Scotland), Courtney Lawes (England), Alun Wyn Jones (Wales),  CJ Stander (Ireland), Rhys Webb (Wales), Elliot Daly (England) With the summer tours done and dusted thoughts turn to next year’s adventure to New Zealand with the British & Irish Lions. But what would the Lions team look like if they were playing the world champions in their own backyard tomorrow? The last time the tourists won a Test in New Zealand, in Wellington in 1993, the starting line-up contained 11 Englishmen and if they played tomorrow it would probably have a similar number. Players who were involved on tours but got injured have found a miracle cure and are eligible but if you missed a tour you are struggling to get in. As it is a one-off game, Eddie Jones can find the time to coach the team. It will probably look a lot different next summer but, with our tin hat at the ready, here goes…Full-back – Stuart Hogg (Scotland)Hogg gets the nod although Liam Williams could just as easily have played here. Hogg was voted Player of the Tournament in the Six Nations and has carried that form on whilst Mike Brown was not at his best on England’s trip to Australia but improved in the final game. Alex Goode must be wondering what he has to do to get a game but expect the odds on Leigh Halfpenny being part of the conversation in 11 months.Electric: Stuart Hogg’s pace and siege-gun boot would be invaluable to the Lions.Wings –Liam Williams (Wales) and George North (Wales)You have to get Williams in somewhere after his barnstorming play took it to the All Blacks in New Zealand where he was Wales’ best player by a mile and probably would have got into a combined team. North played just one Test on the tour before being laid low by a hamstring injury but he is a class act and feared by the Kiwis.Man in form: Liam Williams was the standout success for Wales in New ZealandCentres – Jonathan Joseph (England) and Owen Farrell (England)An honourable mention for Ireland’s Robbie Henshaw here but we are going to stick with the English combo that helped whitewash Australia. Joseph’s form went up a notch from anything he did in the spring, and his defence is strangely undervalued, whilst Farrell is approaching world-class. He kicked 23 from 26 goals in the three Tests and the Lions will need every point they can get against the world champions.Deadly: Owen Farrell is currently the best kicker in the world gameFly-half – George Ford (England)Ford went to Australia in a slump after missing his kicks, and being booed, against Wales and being part of an under-achieving Bath team in the English season. Three weeks later he is back on top of his game after being thrown on after half an hour in Brisbane and his tactical kicking and running of the back line was a huge part of England’s series win. Johnny Sexton missed Ireland’s trip to South Africa but will return to challenge.Scrum-half – Conor Murray (Ireland)Ben Youngs had his three best England games for a while down under and is still struggling to get in the match-day 23. Murray scored the decisive try in Ireland’s first Test win and was a constant thorn in South Africa’s flesh whilst Wales’ Rhys Webb is unlucky to only be on the bench.Experience: Conor Murray provides maturity and showed up well against the BoksProps – Mako Vunipola (England) and Dan Cole (England)Vunipola has improved his scrummaging, is still good round the park and is in the form of his life so he edges in front of Jack McGrath. Leicester’s Cole looked cooked as an international player in the World Cup but has come again and cut out the silly penalties. Eddie Jones name-checked him as one of the players who had improved most on England’s tour – not a bad trick at 29.last_img read more


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The greatest centres of all time: Mike Gibson

first_imgIreland’s Mike Gibson was perhaps one of the most complete midfield players of a generation Ireland’s Mike Gibson representing the Lions It was that remarkable perception that made Gibson as dangerous a player in defence as he was in attack. Everything about his game bore the hallmark of genius. His speed off the mark and sparkling sidestep proved just as valuable as his off-the-ball running when covering threatening situations.Later in his career, Gibson the centre was even better than Gibson the out-half because the new position offered him greater scope to choose his options. His finest hours were with the Lions, with whom he made a record five tours. In New Zealand in 1966 he was the standout player in a modest side, playing centre to accommodate Dai Watkins at fly-half in the Test series.But his biggest contribution came in 1971 when, for the only time to date, the Lions took a rubber off the All Blacks. He started at centre outside Barry John throughout that series and his performances particularly impressed Colin Meads, the New Zealand captain, who paid the Irishman the highest compliment by saying: “Gibson’s presence in the Lions back-line was the most frustrating influence of all.” LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS TAGS: The Greatest Players Major teams: North of Ireland, Cambridge University Country: IrelandTest span: 1964-79Ireland caps: 69 (69 starts)Lions caps: 12 (11 starts)Test points: 112 (9T, 7C, 16P, 6DG)He filled the lead role for Ireland and the Lions in one of the game’s longest-running shows, his representative act embracing a then-world record 69 caps and dozen Lions Tests between 1964 and 1979.Gibson’s vision reading the game was first revealed playing outside-half. He was an elusive runner who used a convincing dummy to unlock defences for Cambridge in the 1963 Varsity Match and was fast-tracked into Ireland’s side for the Five Nations.On his debut he spurred them to a convincing 18-5 win against England at Twickenham, where his uncanny instinct to anticipate complex moves several phases before they unwound led critics to describe him as rugby’s equivalent of a chess grandmaster.last_img read more


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Autumn Internationals Week Four: Five things we learnt

first_img Fiji show what could beWhilst Ireland dominated the USA and the World Rugby awards, it would be remiss not to mention Fiji’s victory over France. It was the result of the weekend and probably the Test result of the year.The difference in financing and preparation time between the two teams couldn’t be starker. Superficially, both teams are filled with well-paid household names playing for big clubs and big wages. But that isn’t how Test rugby works. Test rugby is about preparation time. If it wasn’t then the Barbarians would be the best international team in the world and would stroll through every team in the top ten.Related: Fiji unearth two future starsWhilst most of the Tier One nations have weeks to prepare, Fiji and the other Pacific Island nations have days. As neutral as this column tries to be, it was hugely satisfying the see Fijian’s giving their French counterparts a cheeky slap around the face. Well played Fiji.Bewildered: Michael Cheika looks unimpressed with what’s happening on the Twickenham turfEngland go big on the WallabiesEngland went big against the Wallabies in every regard.Not only was the winning margin massive for a Tier One fixture, but the way in which England produced it was equally gargantuan. It may seem overly simplistic to say that England overpowered the Wallabies, but that’s what happened. You only needed to see the first scrum of the game to understand the rest of the eighty minutes.The Wallaby scrum was demolished in the opening passages of play with their front row creating a new yoga move – the ‘downward dog’ became the ‘mangled wallaby’. But it didn’t stop there. Ben Te’o’s inclusion in the first Test raised a few eyebrows, but in the fourth test, he raised some serious questions about the Wallaby midfield with Bernard Foley and Samu Kerevi missing three tackles each. In fact Kerevi missed as many as he made.Related: How England’s World Cup selection is shaping upWith David Pocock absent, Sam Underhill and his associates feasted on the floor like it was a Toby Carvery and the increasingly impressive Mark Wilson delivered another immaculate performance at No 8.Running free: Joe Cokanasiga tears off another big run against the WallabiesThe ‘Big’ problems for Australia weren’t reduced to the forwards or central channels either. Joe Cokanasiga once again delivered a freakshow performance with three clean breaks and seven defenders beaten, which is hardly surprising given that he’s so big (whatever he’s wearing looks like compression gear). Eddie Jones’ position is quite rightly stabilising, Cheika’s is not. The ice underneath him is becoming so thin you can see the predators peering through.Gatland is finishing off his CV perfectlyAt some stage in the next few years, a TV channel will create an episode of ‘I love the Noughties’ – that’s a reference to times and dates, not Kurtley Beale and Adam Ashley-Cooper. It will feature people fondly remembering The Inbetweeners, Krispy Kreme donuts and Starbucks. Unless you’re Welsh of course.The Welsh edit would also reference that despite Warren Gatland having revolutionised Welsh Test rugby, his record over the southern hemisphere squads hasn’t been good enough. As of 2018 that is no longer the case. Band of brothers: Niki Goneva celebrates with his Fijian team-mates in Paris TAGS: Fiji Full of passion: Alun Wyn Jones of Wales celebrates victory against the SpringboksWales’ victory over the Boks was a gamechanger for Gatland and the squad. Yes, Wales have beaten South Africa before, but overall, they haven’t been particularly good squads. The current Bok squad is different and whilst it may not be as vintage as 2007 or 2009, it has been good enough to beat the All Blacks in New Zealand in 2018.It was a fantastic team performance from Wales. And ‘team’ is the pivotal word. Wales’ previous victories against the southern hemisphere squads have tended to involved Hollywood/miracle moments where Shane Williams had to beat 15 players in one phase or a centre has needed to run 80m to finish an intercept. This performance was different.It was a collective effort of sustained pressure. Alun Wyn Jones was immaculate as ever and Aaron Wainwright, Ellis Jenkins and Justin Tipuric look like they’ve been playing together for decades. But let’s not ignore the impact of Dan Biggar. Some regard Biggar as Wales’ third option at ten, which is premature. His composure and goal-kicking against the Boks was rock-solid. Wales are in a good position and Gatland deserves the praise.Scotland defuse the bombsSometimes it is easy to become accustomed to homogenised rugby. Where attacking and defensive systems have become so clinical and precise that it feels like you’ve seen it all before.Bit of Argy-bargy: Fraser Brow Matias Moroni square up at MurrayfieldScotland v Argentina was not like this. It was like stepping back into the 1980s and showed that the best coaches still have the ability to play the conditions even if the computer says “No”. Due to the weather, the entire game was a throwback to when full-backs earned their wages from catching high balls, not cross-kicks.It would be unfair to label the entire game as a kick-fest. Stuart Hogg’s scanning of the line and blindside attack, which led to Sean Maitland’s first try, was attacking rugby at its best. But this was a defensive game from the outset and deliberately so. A tactic which will serve both well come the Rugby World Cup.Knock-out games are rarely ten try thrillers; they’re often a pick and mix of every aspect of the game. One being goal-kicking. An aspect where Scotland did enough and the Pumas did not. Sanchez won’t be able to kick his goals at 43% come next September. And that’s a fact.Another controversial hit: Farrell whacked Izack RoddaOwen Farrell does it againOne can only assume that Owen Farrell has rugby’s equivalent of diplomatic immunity.What Farrell must do to get penalised for a shoulder-barge is baffling. I’m looking forward to seeing his first red card, because it will probably mean that he’s managed to sneak a weapon onto the field.Related: Aussies cry foul at TwickenhamEven the most hardcore of England fans will concede that a no arms tackle, on the try-line, is a penalty and therefore a penalty try.In the week that World Rugby publicly called for more cards to change players’ behaviour, the decision is even more unusual. Twitter is usually awash with comments about the All Blacks existing in a refereeing-immune bubble, but Farrell seems to be even a level above that. Confusing.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. It was the last round of action this November so Paul Williams gives us his reflections LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more


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Anglicans, Oriental Orthodox agree on Christ’s incarnation

first_img Rector Belleville, IL Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Collierville, TN Press Release Service Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Joel Watson says: An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 October 28, 2014 at 5:12 pm At last! My prayer answered!!! Tags Rector Tampa, FL Associate Rector Columbus, GA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Featured Jobs & Calls Comments (3) Rector Shreveport, LA Ecumenical & Interreligious The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Hopkinsville, KY Comments are closed. Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Knoxville, TN Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Smithfield, NC Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Bath, NC Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Paul Foster says: center_img Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ October 28, 2014 at 9:46 pm God be praised. I guess all good things come in God’s time even if it takes 17 centuries. Featured Events Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Martinsville, VA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Submit a Job Listing By ACNS staffPosted Oct 28, 2014 Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Submit an Event Listing Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Anglican Communion, Diana Bartelt says: Submit a Press Release November 5, 2014 at 5:51 pm One down. Now it’s for Constantinople and Rome to step up to the plate. New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Anglicans, Oriental Orthodox agree on Christ’s incarnation Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Albany, NY Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Washington, DC Youth Minister Lorton, VA Director of Music Morristown, NJ [Anglican Communion News Service] Senior theologians in Anglican Communion and Oriental Orthodox Churches recently made history by signing an agreement on their mutual understanding of Christ’s incarnation.This was not just a minor point of theology, rather it was a subject that divided the Church following the Council of Chalcedon* in 451 AD, leaving the Oriental Orthodox Churches separated from the Eastern Orthodox Churches and the Church of Rome.The work to reconcile these branches of the Christian family on the question of how the two natures, human and divine, were united in one human being: Jesus Christ began in earnest in the 1990s.By 2002 an Agreed Statement on Christology had been prepared by the Anglican-Oriental Orthodox International Commission (AOOIC) and sent to the participating Churches and an updated statement was recirculated in 2013. By the October meeting in Cairo, AOOIC members were able to finalise the document and Bishop Geoffrey Rowell and His Eminence Metropolitan Bishoy of Damietta signed on behalf of their Churches.This statement, which is a significant step of reconciliation, will now be sent to “the responsible authorities of the Oriental Orthodox Churches and the Anglican Communion for their consideration and action”.Click here to read the Agreed Statement on ChristologyClick here to read the Communique from the meeting of the Anglican-Oriental Orthodox International Commission that met in Cairo, Egypt from 13-17 October, 2014.Notes*The Council of Chalcedon was a highly influential church council held from 8 October to 1 November, 451 AD, at Chalcedon (a city of Bithynia in Asia Minor), on the Asian side of the Bosporus. Rector Pittsburgh, PA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY last_img read more


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Un anhelo de seguridad y justicia alimentarias anima la labor…

first_img Associate Rector Columbus, GA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Collierville, TN Submit a Job Listing Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Submit an Event Listing Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Tags Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Un anhelo de seguridad y justicia alimentarias anima la labor de la Diócesis de Los Ángeles Rector Belleville, IL Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Tampa, FL Featured Jobs & Calls Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Shreveport, LA Submit a Press Release Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Ophelia Hernández, trabajadora agrícola; Sarah Nolan, directora de programas y asociaciones comunitarias de La Mesa Abundante y Reyna Ortega, gerente de producción, posan para una fotografía en el campo. Foto de Lynette Wilson/ENS.[Episcopal News Service] Al volar sobre Los Ángeles, la vastedad de la ciudad se visualiza ostensiblemente. Sus pequeños edificios y el concreto emblanquecido por el sol se extienden interminablemente, pero mire usted con mayor atención al área metropolitana y, en las comunidades, escuelas y patios de iglesias, hallará huertos.Los huertos son parte del plan de la Diócesis de Los Ángeles de responder a la seguridad alimentaria en la comunidades a las que sirven sus parroquias, y una de las formas de cuidar del medioambiente.En una de las ciudades más grandes de la nación y en el estado de mayor producción agrícola, la gente no tiene acceso a frutas y hortalizas frescas. A través de Semillas de Esperanza [Seeds of Hope] y La Mesa Abundante [The Abundant Table], la diócesis está haciendo algo al respecto.Hace tres años, el obispo de Los Ángeles, J. Jon Bruno, decidió abordar con seriedad el problema de la inseguridad alimentaria en su diócesis y creó Semillas de Esperanza, que trabaja con congregaciones, comunidades y escuelas para convertir las tierras baldías en huertos productivos de verduras y frutales a fin de brindarles alimentos frescos y saludables a los residentes de la localidad.“En Los Ángeles, el acceso a alimentos nutritivos es un lujo”, dijo el Rdo. Andrew K. Barnett, que preside los estudios medioambientales y la justicia alimentaria del obispo. “Si vives en una comunidad de bajos ingresos, es mucho más fácil obtener comida chatarra”.La posibilidad de alimentos frescos versus la comida chatarra de preparación rápida ha dado lugar a una diferencia de 12 años en la esperanza de vida entre los residentes de barrios de bajos ingresos y los que viven en barrios de moderados a elevados ingresos, añadió Barnett.“Nos fijamos en eso y dijimos, ‘eso es inaceptable, eso está mal’”.Hasta mediado de los años 50, “el Condado de Los Ángeles era el primer condado de producción agrícola… del mundo”, dijo Tim Alderson, director ejecutivo de Semillas de Esperanza, en un vídeo de la Diócesis de Los Ángeles. En el momento de la fundación de la diócesis hace casi 120 años, el 40 por ciento de la población participaba directamente en la agricultura.“En la actualidad, el 1 por ciento de la población se dedica a alimentar al resto de nosotros, lo cual ha creado una verdadera desconexión entre nosotros y las fuentes de nuestros alimentos, y eso ha llevado a la obesidad, la diabetes, [y] otros trastornos metabólicos que nos afectan en todo sentido”, afirmó Alderson.“Tenemos personas en nuestra diócesis que no saben de donde ha de venir la próxima comida y esas mismas personas son obesas”.Semillas de Esperanza asume un enfoque diocesano a la producción y distribución de alimentos, y sirve también para desarrollar los recursos necesarios al objeto de facultar a parroquias, escuelas y otras [instituciones] para que comiencen a cosechar alimentos. La intención es hacer un impacto directo en la salud y el bienestar, tanto física como espiritualmente, de las personas de la comunidad.“Todo llega desproporcionadamente a las personas que viven en la pobreza”, dijo Alderson en una entrevista con Episcopal News Service luego del foro del 24 de marzo sobre la crisis del cambio climático. “Decidimos que necesitábamos abordar este grave problema en las comunidades subatendidas a las que servimos”.A diferencia de lo que ocurre en otras naciones, los estadounidenses que viven en la pobreza tienen más probabilidades de ser obesos, y es más probable que vivan en desiertos alimentarios, o en zonas donde el acceso a los alimentos frescos esté limitado.El Condado de Los Ángeles abarca más de 10.000 kilómetros cuadrados y es el lugar de residencia de 10 millones de personas; de las cuales 1.800.000, o el 18 por ciento, viven en la pobreza.La diócesis – que se extiende por el norte hasta la ciudad de Santa María, en el Condado de Santa Bárbara, hasta San Clemente, en el extremo sur del Condado de Orange, al este hasta la frontera de Arizona y al oeste hasta el océano Pacífico— abarca una gran área geográfica y cuenta con 139 congregaciones, 40 escuelas y 20 instituciones.Tim Alderson, director de Semillas de Esperanza, recoge naranjas para la despensa del Centro de la Catedral. Foto, cortesía de la Diócesis de Los Ángeles.Ciento ocho congregaciones participan en Semillas de Esperanza, ya sea plantando o distribuyendo alimentos o ambas cosas, y la mitad de sus escuelas tienen huertos. Mediante un contrato con el Departamento de Salud Pública de Los Ángeles, ofrece cursos de cocina/nutrición y salud a residentes de bajos ingresos en 17 iglesias de comunidades subatendidas, explicó Alderson.Desde su fundación en enero de 2013, Semillas de Esperanza ha crecido de un personal de solo un miembro a 16, entre ellos 3 empleados de jornada completa, tres de media jornada y 10 voluntarios y, mediante la suma de esfuerzos, está produciendo anualmente 50 toneladas de frutas y hortalizas —800.000 raciones—y proporcionándoles alimentos a aproximadamente unas 30.000 familias al mes a través de las despensas de alimentos.“También servimos más de 30.000 comidas cada mes a personas necesitadas en varios programas de alimentos”, agregó Alderson.Plantando un huerto en la iglesia episcopal del Buen Pastor en Los Ángeles. Foto, cortesía de la Diócesis de Los Ángeles.Al norte de Los Ángeles,  en más de 2 hectáreas del Condado de Ventura, La Mesa Abundante produce más de 50 variedades de frutas y hortalizas, entre ellas remolacha, zanahorias, rábanos, berzas, ajíes chiles, tomates, lechugas y coles.Además de alimentar a los 150 miembros de su programa agrícola de apoyo comunitario, los agricultores venden productos frescos a las escuelas locales y donan el 10 por ciento de su cosecha a un banco de alimentos.Sin embargo, La Mesa Abundante es algo más que una granja, un programa de capacitación y un lugar donde los estudiantes, agrupaciones de jóvenes y otros pueden obtener una experiencia práctica acerca de los alimentos. Su misión se arraiga en la justicia alimentaria: garantizar que las personas tengan acceso a alimentos frescos y nutritivos, que se respeten los derechos de los obreros agrícolas y que a los trabajadores les paguen un salario justo.“Un valor fundacional de nosotros es la justicia alimentaria”, dijo Sarah Nolan, directora de programas y de asociaciones comunitarias.Como ministerio ecuménico e interreligioso de las iglesias Episcopal y Luterana, la iglesia agrícola invita a las personas de todas las tradiciones religiosas a explorar la espiritualidad en conexión con la tierra.“Estamos en verdad tratando de desarrollar un ecosistema que cree un modelo económicamente viable de iglesia y granja”, dijo Nolan, añadiendo que es experimental y que están contemplando cómo el trabajo agrícola apoya al culto y viceversa.El año pasado, La Iglesia Agrícola de la Mesa Abundante recibió una subvención de $100.000 de una iniciativa de la Iglesia Episcopal destinada a la apertura de nuevas iglesias. La subvención fue financiada a través del presupuesto trienal de las Cinco Marcas de la Misión. En este caso, la Iglesia Agrícola de la Mesa Abundante epitomiza la Primera Marca de la Misión: proclamar las buenas nuevas del reino.“La Mesa Abundante es una comunidad de práctica que encarna un testimonio jubiloso y profético del poder de las relaciones justas, no sólo de unos con otros, sino también con la tierra y con los alimentos”, dijo el Rdo. Thomas Brackett, misionero de la Sociedad Misionera Nacional y Extranjera (DFMS) para la apertura de nuevas iglesias e iniciativas misionales, en un mensaje de e-mail.“[Inspira] medidas prudentes que sostienen a comunidades que, de manera deliberada, se arraigan en las prácticas antiguas de seguir a Jesús.  Fue el criterio de nuestro consejo de financiación de la Primera Marca [de la Misión] que probablemente necesitemos 1.000 ministerios más de La Mesa Abundante a través de Estados Unidos. ¡Sarah Nolan y Amy Grossman marchan al frente por una senda que todos debemos finalmente hacer al andar!”.El año pasado, la DFMS le otorgó a Nolan una beca de mayordomía ambiental mediante la cual ella está trabajando en la creación de una red episcopal nacional en torno a los ministerios agrícolas y de alimentos.“Hay tantas personas que ya están haciendo cosas”, dijo ella, además de bancos de alimentos y huertos. El Centro Beecken de la Escuela de Teología de Sewanee, por ejemplo, ha creado la Granja de la Fe y la Red de Alimentos.Una de las principales interrogantes que ella y otros se hacen es: si la Iglesia episcopal se ve a sí misma como un sistema de [provisión de] alimentos, ¿qué haríamos de manera diferente?” Entonces las preguntas subsecuentes podrían ser: ¿cómo usaríamos los campamentos y los centros de conferencia de distinta manera? ¿Cómo conectaríamos a las iglesias con granjeros nuevos y principiantes? ¿Cómo se relacionan los bancos de alimentos con las granjas locales? ¿Cómo surge la liturgia de lo que hacemos?En California, que está entrando en su cuarto año de sequía y los granjeros se han visto forzados a dejar que los cultivos se pudran en los campos, hablar de justicia alimentaria es un pretexto para iniciar debates acerca de las maneras de abordar el cambio climático.“Creo que la facultad de conectarse con el sitio de donde provienen nuestros alimentos y también de participar en el proceso de crecimiento crea una relación con la tierra que da lugar a una actitud de humildad y de asombro ante la creación de Dios. De muchas formas, sabemos que es difícil expresar amor y cuidado por alguien o por alguna cosa sin una relación”, dijo Nolan.“No creo que podamos incluso comenzar a abordar los problemas que rodean al cambio climático sin desarrollar una relación con la tierra y con las personas más afectadas por las consecuencias del calentamiento global”, añadió. “Espero que todos los niños, jóvenes y adultos que visiten nuestras granjas den un paso, sino más, hacia la restauración de una relación con las plantas, los animales, el suelo y todas las complejas relaciones que constituyen nuestro planeta. Para La Mesa Abundante es labor de la Iglesia (especialmente una Iglesia eucarística) ayudar a restaurar esas relaciones mediante el cultivo y el reparto de alimentos y de invitar a otros a que se nos unan en esa labor”.Nota de la redactora: Todos los viernes, durante estos 30 Días de Acción, les invitamos a explorar cómo el cultivo y el reparto de alimentos en su familia, en su comunidad y en su cultura le acerca a la invitación de Dios a todos nosotros de “cultivar y guardar” la tierra.– Lynette Wilson es redactora y reportera de Episcopal News Service. Traducción de Vicente Echerri. Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Smithfield, NC New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Poverty & Hunger Por Lynette Wilson Posted Apr 8, 2015 Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Martinsville, VA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Knoxville, TN Featured Events Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Albany, NY An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Bath, NC In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Hopkinsville, KY Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Washington, DC Press Release Servicelast_img read more


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Archbishop of Canterbury’s ‘deep concern’ over South Sudan

first_img Ecumenical & Interreligious Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Tags Featured Events Rector Bath, NC Youth Minister Lorton, VA By Gavin DrakePosted Nov 28, 2016 Submit an Event Listing Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Collierville, TN Press Release Service Archbishop of Canterbury’s ‘deep concern’ over South Sudan Submit a Job Listing The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Curate Diocese of Nebraska Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Tampa, FL Submit a Press Release Rector Albany, NY Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Smithfield, NC Anglican Communion, Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Pittsburgh, PA Featured Jobs & Calls An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ [Anglican Communion News Service] Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby has spoken of his “deep concern” over the situation in South Sudan, after a meeting with a delegation of the country’s church leaders. The ecumenical delegation from the South Sudan Council of Churches called on Welby at Lambeth Palace last week, a month after their visit with Pope Francis at the Vatican.Full article. Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Shreveport, LA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Belleville, IL Archbishop of Canterbury, Rector Washington, DC Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Knoxville, TNlast_img read more