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England: ‘Renewal’ for church is coming despite ‘trauma’ of pandemic, say…

first_img AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Bath, NC England: ‘Renewal’ for church is coming despite ‘trauma’ of pandemic, say archbishops Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab [Church of England] The Church will emerge “renewed and changed” from the crisis of the global coronavirus pandemic, the Archbishops of Canterbury and York have said.In a joint address to members of the Church of England’s General Synod, Archbishops Justin Welby and Stephen Cottrell said that amid a time of trauma, loss and struggle in this country and around the world, Christians have proved to be a “people of hope”.The address came at the start of special, one-day sitting of Synod in London, with reduced numbers, to make a rule change to enable it to meet remotely during pandemic restrictions.Archbishop Justin acknowledged the multiple challenges and crises we are facing including hunger, poverty, domestic violence and climate change.He said churches have played a vital role serving their communities and bringing hope through the gospel. But the Church itself will, he said, emerge changed.“We do not know what kind of Church of England will emerge from this time except that it will be different,” he said.“It will be changed by the reality that for the first time all churches have closed – first time in 800 years. It will be changed because for the first time we have worshipped virtually.”He continued: “Out of these times we will see renewal – not because we are clever but because God is faithful.“We will see a renewed and changed Church emerging from the shocks of lockdown.“It is a Church that at the most local has fed so many, been in touch with the isolated through the heroic efforts of all who take part in it, of clergy and laity and those who even weren’t near the church before these times.“It is a Church which has continued to pray and to offer worship through our Lord Jesus Christ, even if in new and unusual ways.”Archbishop Stephen spoke with emotion about the impact of pandemic.“I hate this Coronavirus,” he said.“I hate it not only because so many people have died, but because so many people have died alone, unable to hold the hand of their beloved.“I hate it because our health service has been stretched to the limit. I hate it because so many are bereaved and could not even sit next to a family member at a funeral or embrace each other.“I hate it because weddings and baptisms and ordinations have been postponed or have gone ahead without the parties that were meant to be with them.“I hate it because children’s schooling has been disrupted. I hate it because so many people are so ill, so many crying out in pain, so many isolated, lonely, fearful, depressed.“I hate it because behind locked doors terrible things have happened. I hate it because the poor and the disadvantaged have been hit the hardest.“I hate it because it has left so many people across the world feeling hopeless as if life itself has been taken from us.”But he said he was also thankful for the faithfulness of all who have served others during the crisis and risen to the challenge.He added: “I am thankful that despite all the horrors of a Covid world we are learning a new commitment to Christ and how to be a humbler, simpler, church and we are putting Christ at the centre of our lives and learning very, very, very painfully what it really means to be a church that is dependent on Christ alone.“And I am filled for longing: I long for us to be a more Christ-centered and Jesus-shaped church witnessing to Christ and bringing the healing balm of the Gospel to our nation for this is our vocation.” Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Submit a Press Release Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Featured Events Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Posted Sep 24, 2020 Rector Knoxville, TN Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Collierville, TN An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Director of Music Morristown, NJ The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Curate Diocese of Nebraska This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET center_img Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Anglican Communion, Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Albany, NY Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Belleville, IL Featured Jobs & Calls Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Smithfield, NC Archbishop of Canterbury Associate Rector Columbus, GA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Shreveport, LA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Press Release Service Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Submit a Job Listing Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Tags Rector Washington, DC Submit an Event Listing Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Tampa, FL last_img read more


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On Mission: Flowing Brook supports local children

first_img Local cases hold at 27; state to consider ‘reopening’ Health care providers in Pike County remain in prepared as the state nears an anticipated peak in COVID-19 infections. Amy… read more By Jaine Treadwell Around the WebMd: Do This Immediately if You Have Diabetes (Watch)Blood Sugar BlasterIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier LivingWomen Only: Stretch This Muscle to Stop Bladder Leakage (Watch)Patriot Health ZoneHave an Enlarged Prostate? Urologist Reveals: Do This Immediately (Watch)Healthier LivingRemoving Moles & Skin Tags Has Never Been This EasyEssential Health32-second Stretch Ends Back Pain & Sciatica (Watch)Healthier LivingThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancel “We offer programs and resources where youth and their families grow and develop,” Reynolds said. Flowing Brook’s staff of three and volunteers go into the homes of those they serve to meet the needs where they exist.“We work with at-risk individuals and the families that are affected,” Reynolds said. “We serve them where they are most comfortable and most receptive. Most often we meet individually and once or twice a month in groups.”The services of Flowing Brook also include services from renovating houses, to buying groceries, to taking kids to dinner so they can learn to order from a menu.“Life skills are very important and teaching kids those skills is also a focus of what we do,” Reynolds said. “We are excited that residential housing for at-risk adolescents is coming soon. At Flowing Brook, we continue to search for and find ways to help individuals, families and communities.”Donations are always needed and appreciated. For more information, visit the Flowing Brook, Inc. website. Plans underway for historic Pike County celebration On Mission: Flowing Brook supports local children Published 6:20 pm Thursday, April 16, 2020 Email the author Skip Print Article When schools closed statewide due to the coronavirus, there was a short span when schools were not feeding lunches to the kids.Flowing  Brook, Inc. and Sonic of Troy responded by coming together to provide lunch for 330 kids in Troy Public Housing on March 18.Shabrell Reynolds, founder of Flowing Brook, Inc., a non-profit organization, said there was a need and an opportunity and filling needs is the purpose and goal of Flowing Brook Inc. Flowing Brook also offers a variety of specialty services that include anxiety, trauma, depression, eating disorders, family and friend loss, adolescent issues and spirit counseling.“Flowing Brook provides a Christ-centered approach to service,” Reynolds said. “Flowing Brook uses the practicality of spirituality to help individuals and families and members of the community achieve wholeness in their lives. We meet people where they are and provide the services they need.”Referrals come to Flowing Brook from a variety of resources including Child Advocacy Centers, the Department of Human Resources, schools, churches and, at times from individuals who recognize a need and from word of mouth.Flowing Brook provides a comprehensive family and community approach to its services. Troy falls to No. 13 Clemson Remember America’s heroes on Memorial Day Latest Stories By The Penny Hoarder Sponsored Content Penny Hoarder Issues “Urgent” Alert: 6 Companies Are… Pike County Sheriff’s Office offering community child ID kits You Might Like “Our mission is to ensure youth growth and development through a comprehensive family and community initiative,” Reynolds said. “We wanted to show our support of these kids and their parents and let them know how important they are and that they will be cared for during these very difficult times.”Reynolds, formerly of Troy, operates Flowing Brook out of the Montgomery area but its reaches also extend throughout the Wiregrass area and into West Alabama.Flowing Brook provides a variety of services for ages two through 21. The services provided include individual and family counseling, group therapy, retreats, workshops, college preparation and career enrichment. Book Nook to reopen Shabrell Reynolds and the volunteers with Flowing Brook Inc. have been providing outreach to children in Pike County during the COVID-19 crisis, including partnering with local restaurants to feed children in need.last_img read more


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The roots of artistry

first_imgArtists eager to capture earth’s beauty know that Mother Nature often hides her wonders from easy view. But a clever new exhibit at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study is bringing some of that organic beauty out of the shadows.Rosetta Elkin’s “Live Matter,” organized in collaboration with Radcliffe’s Academic Ventures arts program and on display in Byerly Hall through May 29, transforms the ordinary into the extraordinary through a simple shift of perspective.Visitors to Byerly’s Johnson-Kulukundis Family Gallery will get a rare look at the complex and creative architecture of plant life typically hidden underground. Suspended by an intricate latticework attached to the gallery ceiling is part of the mature root system of a white poplar, Populus alba in Latin“I wanted to extract a root system in order to highlight its beauty,” said Elkin, assistant professor of landscape architecture at the Harvard Graduate School of Design. “The exhibition is taking a view on live matter, plants, trees, that is never taken.“I hope people take away an appreciation for the aliveness of the plant world,” she added, “and the mystery.”The section of the root system was delicately extracted from a poplar at Harvard’s Arnold Arboretum. Elkin worked closely with the arboretum staff, using an air spade (a tool that blasts away the soil with pressurized air while keeping the roots intact).An artist whose preferred medium was silkscreen, Elkin’s 2-D fascination became 3-D once she discovered landscape architecture after college. From then on, she “couldn’t work without space.”Her professional projects have involved large-scale ventures: master plans, vegetation research in North Africa, and even a green reimagining of the headquarters of China’s Shenzhen Stock Exchange. But in such extreme urban or drought-affected environments, said Elkin, “It’s not about planting, but cultivating. It’s a very different set of operations, and it gave me a great appreciation for aliveness.”Such big projects, which often involve large teams of architects and specialists, also gave her an appreciation for a smaller scale. For the past five years, she has turned to such projects for her installations. Her operating rule is: “Can I lift it? Can I move it? I need to be able to do the work myself.” For an installation at Boston’s Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum titled “Tiny Taxonomy,” Elkin offered up an inventory of some of the forest floor’s smallest plants for viewers to inspect at eye level.Elkin hopes to shift the botanical narrative with her scaled-down approach to the seemingly ordinary. Scientific botany, with its measureable classifications, quantifiable data, simplification, and regularity, provides a “singular perspective that raises awareness of what we can do with plants, rather than what plants are actually doing,” notes her exhibit’s accompanying catalog.Elkin is fascinated with the white poplar because of its capacity to clone itself endlessly. The tree sprouts its spindly root systems, consisting of long and fibrous fingers, in perpetuity. Its robust reproductive cycle makes it unpopular with homeowners, but it’s a botanical wonder to Elkin.“This individual mother sends out roots not only to gain nutrients but also to reproduce,” Elkin said of the roughly 80-year-old poplar — still thriving in the arboretum — that yielded a part of its root system for the show. “Genetically, it’s exactly the same as the mother plant … it’s an everlasting, endless loop of the same kind of immortality of this plant that is just so successful that it tends to dominate.”Elkin’s desire to shift people’s perspectives by highlighting the inherent beauty in living things is mirrored in her show catalog. Paired with images and text are comments and quotes from a range of scholars who “write with a deep appreciation for the aliveness of the plant.”German writer Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, naturalists Charles Darwin, Asa Gray, and others all wrote about plants, said Elkin, in a very different way than “capital-S science does.”One of her favorite quotes appears at the beginning of the guide. It’s a line from the Austro-Hungarian botanist Raoul H. Francé, who wrote: “Form is but the track left by life.”“It takes a particular kind of botanist,” said Elkin, “to write that line.”last_img read more


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Legislation being tabled to prevent hot car deaths

first_imgUS lawmakers are proposing legislation which would require car makers to install sensors that alert drivers if a child is being left in a car.On average 37 children die each year in a hot car. Most of the time they were accidentally forgotten by a parent or a caregiver. Nine have died in this fashion since the year began.If proponents have their way – your car will soon provide one more alert to make sure this can’t happen.In the meantime – never leave a child in a car unattended.Do whatever it takes to remember to check your back seat.Advocates suggest tossing your purse in the back seat – or better yet, toss one of your shoes back there.Most importantly – don’t think a hot car tragedy can’t happen even on a cloudy day.Even if it is 52 degrees outside children can die from heat stroke inside a vehicle. Heat stroke sets in at 104 degrees. Human cells start to shut down at 107 degrees. And a child’s body heats up three to five times faster than an adult’s.General Motors already has some of this technology in its cars.The Hot Cars Act would require it in all vehicles. It will be announced on Capital Hill Wednesday.last_img read more