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Dunnion takes the chair at Donegal GAA convention

first_img WhatsApp Dunnion takes the chair at Donegal GAA convention Google+ Guidelines for reopening of hospitality sector published Calls for maternity restrictions to be lifted at LUH Previous articleMedia urged to be careful not to inadvertently glamorise suicideNext articleLarkin says Bonagee link should become a Jobs Initiative project News Highland Three factors driving Donegal housing market – Robinson Twitter RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR The Donegal GAA has a new leader. Four Masters representative Sean Dunnion has won a three way contest to become the new County Chairman, replacing outgoing Chair PJ Mc Gowan.The vote was taken at the County Convention in Donegal Town yesterday, with outgoing Vice Chair Charlie Cannon and Mick Mc Grath the other candidates.Chris Mc Nulty of the Donegal News was there……..[podcast]http://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/12/chris10.mp3[/podcast]Meanwhile, there was some discussion of the 5 euro levy on All-Ireland tickets which was criticised by Croke Park and subsequently described by the County Board as a ‘voluntary contribution’.Chris Mc Nulty says clubs have been given the option of applying for a refund, but it didn’t become a major issue…………..[podcast]http://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/12/chris2.mp3[/podcast] NPHET ‘positive’ on easing restrictions – Donnelly Pinterestcenter_img Pinterest By News Highland – December 17, 2012 Facebook Help sought in search for missing 27 year old in Letterkenny WhatsApp News Twitter Facebook Google+ LUH system challenged by however, work to reduce risk to patients ongoing – Dr Hamiltonlast_img read more


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Stress guidance cuts compensation woes

first_img Comments are closed. Previous Article Next Article Stress guidance cuts compensation woesOn 12 Feb 2002 in Personnel Today Employers offering confidential counselling services to staff are unlikelyto be found guilty in stress compensation claims following a landmark legalruling last week. The Court of Appeal has laid down new guidelines stating that stressedemployees must talk to bosses about their problems before resorting to legalaction. The guidelines follow TUC research, which reveals a 12-fold increase in thenumber of work-related stress claims last year. The court overturned damages of almost £200,000 and ruled no job isinherently dangerous to mental health. It also ruled that firms are entitled toassume workers can handle the normal pressures of their job unless notified ofany problems. Diane Sinclair, employee relations adviser at the CIPD, welcomed the guidelinesas they will place the onus on employees to raise their concerns over stress atwork before taking legal action. “The Court of Appeal has reached the common sense decision. Employeesmust make their employer aware of any stress they are suffering as a result ofwork. Employers, for their part, must take complaints seriously and act as soonas possible to resolve the problems,” she said. Russell McCallion, HR director for London Luton Airport, also supported theruling. “Work is rarely the sole source of stress in an employee’s life,”he said. “Perhaps this ruling will help address the reality that stress isa factor in all aspects of life, not just at work. Employers do need to addresslegitimate employee stress concerns in a supportive and realistic manner.”Christopher Mordue, an associate at Pinsent Curtis Biddle, said the rulingwill mean HR professionals must re-examine their policies to ensure theyprovide effective counselling and occupational health provision. By Ross Wigham The guidelines will mean:– Employers will usually be able toassume that employees can withstand the pressures of the job unless they knowof some particular problem or vulnerability– If the employer offers a confidential counselling servicewith access to treatment they will rarely be held in breach of their duty ofcare– Employees will need to raise concerns regarding stress withtheir employers and give the employer a chance to do something about it.FeedbackStress prevention better than cureRussell McCallion, HR director atLondon Luton Airport, said: “First, the employee and employer can jointly address anyperceived issues at a stage before the employee is faced with a major healthproblem, ensuring an early resolution.Second, and of equal importance, the major stress imposed onemployee and employer in entering legal proceedings to resolve an advanced casemay be avoided.”Sally Storey, HR director at theQueen Elizabeth Hospital in Greenwich, said: “Although I support the move, I have concerns. Many staffwill be reluctant to disclose stress at early stages and this change in culturewill take a while to take effect. As an HR professional I am concerned thathard-line managers will be able to hide behind the excuse of ‘they didn’t tellme’.”Line managers should be as aware [of staff stresspost-changes] as they are now.”Martin Hinchliffe, HR director forWelcome Break, said: “This will encourage all employers to examine theirinternal procedures so they comply with the guidelines.”Perhaps if an individual is alone in finding an existingrole stressful they could be moved to a different role within the company.”TUC senior health and safetypolicy officer, Owen Tudor said: “Unions will certainly ensure that employers know theymust assess the risks of stressful occupations. We shall make sure our membersknow that the Court of Appeal has urged them not to suffer in silence but gettheir complaints about bullying, overwork, inadequate training and unrealisticdeadlines on record.” Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more


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“READERS FORUM’” AUGUST 11, 2018

first_imgWe hope that today’s “Readers Forum” will provoke honest and open dialogue concerning issues that we, as responsible citizens of this community, need to address in a rational and responsible way? WHATS ON YOUR MIND TODAY?Todays“Readers Poll” question is: Do you feel that the IU Medical school will have a major economic impact on downtown Evansville?Please take time and read our articles entitled “STATEHOUSE Files, CHANNEL 44 NEWS, LAW ENFORCEMENT, READERS POLL, BIRTHDAYS, HOT JOBS” and “LOCAL SPORTS”.  You now are able to subscribe to get the CCO daily.If you would like to advertise on the CCO please contact us [email protected]: City-County Observer Comment Policy.  Be kind to people. No personal attacks or harassment will not be tolerated and shall be removed from our site.We understand that sometimes people don’t always agree and discussions may become a little heated.  The use of offensive language, insults against commenters will not be tolerated and will be removed from our siteFacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more


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Fresh, Homemade Chocolate is the Way Rauhauser’s Candy Shop Does it

first_imgRauhauser’s candy store has been a fixture on Asbury Avenue since 1965. By Donald WittkowskiIn the 1971 fantasy movie “Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory,” the finders of five “golden tickets” hidden inside some candy bars are promised a tour of the factory and a lifetime supply of chocolate.Customers at Rauhauser’s Own Make Candies don’t need golden tickets to enter the store, but once inside, they may find it every bit as beguiling as the chocolate wonderland depicted in the movie.The quaint shop at 721 Asbury Ave. in downtown Ocean City has been satisfying the sweet tooth of legions of customers since it was founded in 1965 by Curvin Rauhauser and his wife, Mary Alice.Now, the third generation of the family is in charge. Curvin and Mary Alice’s grandson, Rod Blomdahl and his wife, Kelly, have owned the store for nearly five years. The Blomdahls have kept the family tradition alive by making all of their chocolates from scratch, using Curvin’s original recipe.“This is a dying brand. There’s not many of us left,” Rod Blomdahl said of the dwindling number of chocolate shops that hand-make their candy.Customers marvel over the array of chocolate candies in the display cases.Blomdahl noted that all of the chocolate candies sold at Rauhauser’s are freshly made and contain no preservatives. There is no mystery about their age or ingredients. Altogether, the shop makes 300 varieties of chocolate.“It’s made in the back and sold in the front,” Blomdahl said.Bags of raw chocolate and sugar are stacked on shelves in the back of the store, where a miniature version of Willy Wonka’s chocolate factory of sorts exists. Butter and milk are other key ingredients, of course. Blomdahl pointed to some old-fashioned copper kettles and large wooden spoons that are used for mixing the ingredients together.He explained that chocolate-making is an art. There are no shortcuts. It requires long hours and a great deal of precision to ensure everything is done just right.Even the temperatures for heating and cooling the candy must be exact. For instance, warm chocolate that is used to coat the pieces of candy rolling down a small conveyor belt is maintained at 88.9 degrees. There is also a “chilling room” for storing the freshly made candy centers before they are bathed in chocolate.“One thing I learned from my grandfather is, you have to be precise. It’s a lot more difficult than baking,” Blomdahl said.Rod Blomdahl, grandson of the original owners, represents the third generation of his family to run the store.With Christmas approaching, Rauhauser’s is now in its second-busiest time of year. Easter is first and Valentine’s Day is third.The Blomdahls and their children, sons Jeff, 29, and Trevor, 24, and daughters Blake, 22, and Jordan, 18, have been putting in hectic hours and a seven-day workweek to meet the demands of the holiday crowds.“We got out of here at what, 12 midnight last night?” Kelly Blomdahl asked her husband Wednesday. “That was early, though.”Sisters Jordan, left, and Blake Blomdahl are part of the family-operated business.Step inside the store and you’ll immediately breathe in the sweet aroma of chocolate. The display cases are filled with every type of chocolate candy imaginable. Assorted chocolates, caramel, decorated mints, chocolate-covered pretzels and chocolate-covered marshmallows are some of the favorites around Christmas.In addition to its walk-in business at the shop, Rauhauser’s also ships its chocolates to customers across the country. It has a website, but has not yet begun offering online sales. Kelly Blomdahl noted that online sales could come “someday.”So for now, Rauhauser’s will continue doing things the old-fashioned way, both with its sales and with making the candy. Rod Blomdahl said what matters most is the freshness and quality of the chocolates, not high-tech customer marketing.“We don’t have to sell our product. Once it gets in their mouth, it sells itself,” he said.Trevor Blomdahl places candy centers on a conveyor belt before they are dipped in chocolate.last_img read more