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Brazilian President Praises Military World Games

first_imgBy Dialogo July 19, 2011 “In addition to the military’s premier sporting event, (the 5th Military World Games) it is also the third largest sporting event in the world after the Olympics and the FIFA World Cup. Therefore, they serve as preparation for the World Cup and the Olympics.” That’s what Brazil President Dilma Rousseff, said in her weekly radio show “Coffee with the President.” The Games, which are taking place in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, July 24, has the participation of more than 100 countries and 6,000 athletes, and is organized by the International Military Sports Council (CISM). The president of Brazil commended the joint work of civil and military societies.last_img


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Latest: Man Utd 0 Fulham 1

first_imgSteve Sidwell’s 19th-minute goal gave underdogs Fulham a shock lead against the champions.The Whites got men behind the ball and defended well before scoring with their first attack of the match.Lewis Holtby chipped the ball forward and Sidwell sneaked in unmarked to fire home from 10 yards.Robin van Persie then missed a great chance to equalise for Manchester United when he blazed over after being found by Rafael’s right-wing cross.Former United coach Rene Meulensteen selected a surprising line-up on his return to Old Trafford.The Fulham boss, whose side are bottom of the Premier League, opted for Muamer Tankovic. 18, as a lone striker, with Holtby supporting the Swedish youngster from midfield.Record signing Kostas Mitroglou was not in the matchday squad but deadline day arrival Johnny Heitinga is making his debut and Ryan Tunnicliffe, recently signed from United, was also given a starting place.Sidwell is captaining the side, with Scott Parker and Brede Hangeland both among Meulensteen’s substitutes.Manchester United: De Gea, Rafael, Smalling, Vidic, Evra; Mata, Carrick, Fletcher, Young; Rooney, van Persie.Subs: Lindegaard, Ferdinand, Giggs, Valencia, Kagawa, Januzaj, Hernandez.Fulham: Stekelenburg; Riether, Burn, Heitinga, Riise; Tunnicliffe, Sidwell, Kvist, Richardson; Holtby, Tankovic.Subs: Stockdale, Hangeland, Kacaniklic, Duff, Cole, Parker, Bent.Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more


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Holidays that save the world

first_imgOnce degraded and depleted of wildlife by hunters and others, the 57 000 acres of bushveld that make up Phinda Private Game Reserve have been rejuvenated and restocked with over 2 000 animals. (Image: Phinda Private Game Reserve)Khanyi MagubaneSouth Africa’s Phinda Private Game Reserve has been announced as one of five international winners of Conde Nast Traveler magazine’s prestigious 2008 World Saver awards for socially responsible travel destinations.Launched in 2007, the awards are aimed at “turning the travel industry’s enormous potential to improve the planet into reality”, the magazine says. There are five World Saver categories, for travel businesses making a significant contribution to poverty alleviation, preservation, education, wildlife and health.Owned by Conservation Corporation Africa, or CC Africa, Phinda Private Game Reserve was the overall winner of in the wildlife category. It also received an honourable mention in three more of the five World Saver categories – for poverty alleviation, education and health. The awards will be handed out at a gala function during the second annual Conde Nast Traveler World Savers Congress in New York on 23 September. The winners will also feature in the magazine’s September issue.CC Africa is an ecotourism company with over 45 safari lodges across Africa. It established Phinda in 1991, on 57 000 acres of degraded and empty bushveld. Nearly all the animals had been killed by farmers, ivory hunters, and a misguided government project to eradicate the tsetse fly.The company’s ambitious bush rehabilitation and wildlife restocking programme soon turned the wasteland into a thriving wilderness. Over 2 000 animals, from six-ton elephants to white rhinos, cheetahs, lions, giraffes, zebras, wildebeest and buck, were moved into the reserve – a massive undertaking in logistics and animal management. Phinda’s success in restoring natural African ecosystems has become a model for similar projects across the continent.Black rhino transferred to Phinda by the World Wildlife Fund – 15 of just 3 500 left in the world – flourished and began to reproduce. CC Africa is now focusing on small carnivores such as servals and jackals, which may not have the star appeal of big game but are just as integral to the ecosystem.Located in the north of KwaZulu-Natal province, the reserve has seven distinct ecosystems and an impressive collection of plants, birds and wildlife – including Africa’s Big Five, the lion, leopard, elephant, rhino and buffalo. Other animals that can be spotted include the cheetah, giraffe and a variety of buck species. On night drives visitors can also see the nocturnal aardvark, bushpig and bushbaby.Sandwiched between Mkuze Game Reserve and the Greater St Lucia Wetland Park, a Unesco World Heritage Site, Phinda has 380 bird species, while the marine diversity off the nearby coast of Sodwana is said to give Australia’s Great Barrier Reef Australia stiff competition.Responsible tourismCC Africa is a leader in environmentally friendly tourism, or ecotourism. The International Ecotourism Society defines ecotourism as “Responsible travel to natural areas that conserves the environment and improves the well-being of the local people.”According to CC Africa, ecotourism is the implementation of good tourism practice that minimises impacts, improves environmental and cultural awareness, creates positive experiences for both travellers and Africa’s people, ensures direct financial benefits for conservation efforts and provides financial benefits and empowerment for local people.The company says tourists wanting the safari experience should be environmentally aware, and should choose a lodge or safari operator committed to the principles of ecotourism. Tourists should also take the time to acquaint themselves with the culture of rural people in the area they visit, in a bid to possibly also influence their own communities when they return home, teaching them more about the world.Educating the communityPhinda received its honourable mention in the education category for a broad range of educational projects it runs in the local rural community, from school-building to bursaries. It has built more than 90 new classrooms and renovated many more, constructed three libraries and a science laboratory, and provided playground equipment, toys, school supplies and more than 150 000 books to local schools.Phinda’s Africa Foundation runs education projects at primary school, high school and tertiary levels to help improve rural youngsters’ opportunities. Its Community Leaders Education Fund (CLEF) has awarded university scholarships to more than 150 disadvantaged but deserving students over the past nine years.Launched in 1995 it has spent almost $160 000 (R1.2-million), with a 96% success rate among sponsored students. The value of each grant depends on the number of students selected; the annual average ranges between $1 500 (R11 500) and $3 000 (R23 000) per student.There is no restriction on the field of study; students may take any career path they choose. A condition of the scholarships is that students must return to their rural homes during terms breaks to carry out different types of community service, depending on the subjects they are taking.Phinda also runs the Siya Kwamukela Hospitality Bursary Programme, established in 2000, in partnership with the Africa Foundation and champagne house Moët et Chandon, to train local high school graduates in the tourism industry.Honourable mention for healthConde Nast gave the game reserve an honourable mention in the health category of the World Saver awards for its medical clinic, HIV/Aids programme, and water safety and nutrition interventions. The Mduku Clinic, set up by the Africa Foundation, operates 24 hours a day and serves 42 000 local people every year.Phinda has also started a health programme to help villagers prevent the spread of HIV/Aids, help the HIV-positive and care for those with full-blown Aids. It has also distributed some 233 “hippo water rollers” to help women to transport clean water from distant wells. The water rollers are drums with a capacity of 90 litres each. This is a vast amount of water, compared to the usual five-litre containers carried on the heads of women and children.In 2003 CC Africa launched the Positive Health programme to provide health education to their staff and extended families, committing over US$100 000 (R771 000) to initial training and support. The project is inspired by David Patient, the world’s longest HIV-positive survivor, and research psychologist Neil Orr.In February 2008 Phinda also launched a skills and health centre at the Mduku DevCentre, located just outside the game reserve. Sponsored by insurance company Hollard, the project aims to see to the urgent and educational needs of the community.During the launch, local community members were given samples of healthy food such as pumpkin seeds, sunflower seeds, fruit and aloe juice during discussions on the importance of a healthy diet. Two new Positive Health products were also launched: fortified e-Pap – pap, made from maize or corn meal, is a South African staple food – and e-Soup, a simple and easy-to-make soup, packed with the necessary vitamins.Phinda’s honourable mention for poverty alleviation was won for its ranger training school. It is the only safari company to have such a programme, and many of its graduates become trackers at the reserve.Another South African travel business, the luxury Twelve Apostles Hotel and Spa in Cape Town, was also given an honorary mention for poverty alleviation. The hotel sources 80% of the goods in its gift shop from local craft groups, which teach poor women skills such as papermaking and beading.Conde Nast awards across AfricaA number of other tourist destinations received Conde Nast World Saver awards and honourable mentions. The overall winner in the poverty alleviation category was Campi ya Kanzi, a Kenyan safari camp that is powered by solar energy and primarily staffed by members of the local Maasai tribe.The camp was set up by Luca Belpietro, managing director of an Italian consulting firm, in 1996. His aim wasn’t to make a fortune out of wealthy tourists; rather, it was to ensure the protection of the wilderness, the wildlife, and Maasai culture. He made a deal with the Maasai on the Kuku Group Ranch: if they would set aside 280 000 acres as a nature reserve, he would finance a solar-powered safari camp that they could staff.Once the camp was running, Belpietro started the Maasai Wilderness Conservation Trust, which has helped build schools, sponsor scholarships, pay for medical supplies, and employ game scouts. Last year, Campi ya Kanzi injected some $650 000 (R5-million) into the community.Located in an area between Amboseli and Tsavo National Parks, the camp offers a luxury-tented experience for about US$500 (R3 850) a night. It features Maasai-led walking safaris, giving visitors the thrill of tracking game on foot.In neighbouring Mozambique, the Nkwichi Lodge received an honourable special mention in the education category. Through its community work, the lodge has constructed and refurbished primary schools in seven surrounding villages, providing a better learning environment for 800 children. It has also helped build a clinic and a number of roads.Established in 1999 as a private company and community trust, the project involves 20 000 local Nyanja people in carving out a huge conservation area along the shores of Lake Niassa.In Tanzania, tour operator Abercrombie & Kent received an honourable mention in the education category. Through their foundation Friends of Conservation, they support a number of environmental and social causes, including opening a school for 600 children. They also fund environmental learning centres and conservation clubs in 50 Maasai schools in Kenya.Related articlesSocial development in South AfricaSouth Africa’s national parksTaking African bush lore to OzKruger Park marks 110 yearsSouth Africa shines at World Travel Awards Ecotourism reaps rich rewardsSouth Africa among World’s Best for travel Useful linksPhinda Private Game ReserveCC Africa Responsible SafarisConde Nast Traveler Twelve Apostles Hotel and SpaCyber to Nature Travel Services Campi ya Kanzi Maasai Wilderness Conservation Trust Nkwichi LodgeFriends of Conservationlast_img read more


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South African director to helm Hollywood action film

first_img8 March 2016Gary [email protected] actioner “Hunter Killer” brings on Donovan Marsh to helm https://t.co/X2WnzIeeCE pic.twitter.com/uklXaXZiiG— Tracking Board (@MyTrackingBoard) March 5, 2016Director and writer Donovan Marsh, responsible for bringing South Africa’s favourite schoolboy to life on the big screen in the first two Spud films, has been chosen to direct his first Hollywood film, Hunter Killer, starring legendary character actor Gary Oldman and action movie hero Gerard Butler.Marsh is a fixture in the South African film, television and media industry, having directed a number of commercials and television productions, including the Class Act acting reality show. Feature films, though, are his first love and where he has gained his most success. His first film, the Safta-winning Dollars and White Pipes, was an action-packed South African gangster drama. It gained a cult following in South Africa.He also directed and scripted the first two Spud films, bringing John Milton, the lovable but awkward hero of John van der Ruit’s popular book series, to wider local and international audiences.“iNumber Number” – Donovan Marsh (2013) pic.twitter.com/YboqwS3gu5— Framing Blackness (@FramingBlacknes) Novembe r 8, 2015Marsh’s greatest international triumph so far, however, has been as director and writer of the critically acclaimed action drama iNumber Number, which earned selection for the 2013 Toronto International Film Festival. It was also an audience favourite at the official Quentin Tarantino Film Festival. He won a Best Screenplay Award for the film at the 2013 Africa International Film Festival in Lagos, Nigeria. The film also won Best Director, Best Writer and Best Editing at the South African Film and Television Awards (Saftas).And now Hollywood has come calling, selecting Marsh to direct Butler and Oldman in an action thriller about an American submarine commander sent deep into Russian waters to save the elected Russian president in the midst of a military coup. The film begins shooting in London in July 2016.Marsh follows other prominent South African directors working in international mainstream cinema, including Gavin Hood (Tsotsi, Wolverine), Neil Blomkamp (District 9, Chappie) and Jann Turner (TV’s Castle, Teen Wolf).Speaking to the Screen Africa website in 2013, Marsh explained what inspired him as a director.“I am inspired by filmmakers who are always fully aware and respectful of their audience and do everything in their power, in every second and in every frame, to entertain, surprise, move and finally comment on the nature of humanity. Good solid thinking also inspires me. The world is in sore need of powerful thinkers.”A fan of directors such as Martin Scorsese, Tarantino and the Coen brothers, Marsh wants to create films that have both good action and real character development. His new opportunity working in international cinema will, no doubt, give him the chance to use that talent to tell more South African stories to the world.Source: Deadline (USA)last_img read more


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SA small-scale farmers take on hunger

first_img25 October 2013 The government has set aside R2-billion to support the Fetsa Tlala (End Hunger), President Jacob Zuma said at the launch of the food production initiative in Batlharos outside Kuruman in the Northern Cape on Thursday. Fetsa Tlala seeks to promote self-sufficiency by helping communities to produce food – including maize, beans, wheat, sunflower, ground nuts and potatoes – on communal and under-used land. The initiative aims to help small-scale and smallholder farmers put one-million hectares of land which has been lying fallow under production over the next five years, as well as to help small businesses process the crops once they have been harvested. Zuma said that Fetsa Tlala also aimed to shift perceptions about the importance of agriculture and farming in general, noting that agriculture was one of six job drivers – along with mining, tourism, the green economy, manufacturing and infrastructure development – identified in the government’s New Growth Path. Encouraging people to go back to farming “We are encouraging people to go back to farming. We are encouraging every household to develop a food garden. We want to see women’s co-operatives and community groupings focusing on vegetable production, livestock or chickens to earn a living and fight hunger and poverty.” Zuma said that, while South Africa’s overall food insecurity figure was declining, there were still families that lived in poverty. At the same time, the country remained a net importer of food. The worst poverty is concentrated in South Africa’s former apartheid “homelands”, which account for 13 percent of the country’s land and were home to half of the black population before 1994. “These areas have remained extremely poor and underdeveloped, and are heavily dependent on remittances from workers in industrial South Africa,” Zuma said, adding that South African agriculture continued to be characterised by a racially skewed distribution of assets, support services, market penetration, infrastructure and income. “Some 36 000 large-scale farmers control over 86-million hectares of farmland, while 1.4-million black farmers have access to about 14-million hectares of farmland.”Support, markets for small-scale farmers Zuma said there was a significant amount of land that still lay fallow in South Africa’s rural areas, some of which had been freed up through land reform. Smallholder farmers, communities and households would be given assistance in developing this land through the provision of mechanisation support, distribution and technical services. Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries Minister Tina Joemat-Pettersson, addressing a business breakfast briefing in Johannesburg last month, said her department had already brought 200 000 hectares of land under producbtion on seven province – the goal being one-million hectares by 2019. “Once the food is produced and harvested through Fetsa Tlala, we will then ensure that there is sufficient support for SMMEs [small, medium and micro enterprises] in the agriculture, forestry and fisheries processing sectors to mill the meal or pack the vegetables.” Joemat-Pettersson said the department would also work with the Department of Trade and Industry to establish markets for small-scale farmers, fishers and foresters. “This is no dream; it is already happening on the ground, where thousands of hectares have been successfully placed under production – some for consumption, and some for sale, stimulating local economies. “Government runs hospitals … we have the South African National Defence Force, school feeding schemes, and prisons. Smallholder farmers and producers should have a market in these organisations,” she said. “Government should be buying food straight from our smallholders and creating viable markets for them. This is what Fetsa Tlala is about. It is about unlocking the economies of rural areas.” Source: SAnews.gov.zalast_img read more