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Agency MSR Portfolio With $736 Million in UPB Up For Bidding

first_img Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago  Print This Post Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago in Daily Dose, Featured, News, Secondary Market Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Agency MSR Portfolio With $736 Million in UPB Up For Bidding Previous: Foreclosures Continue Steady Nationwide Decline in December Next: Wayne County, Michigan, Officials Help More Than 4,000 Avoid Foreclosure Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Tagged with: Fannie Mae Freddie Mac Ginnie Mae mortgage servicing rights MountainView Servicing Group The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago Tory Barringer began his journalism career in early 2011, working as a writer for the University of Texas at Arlington’s student newspaper before joining the DS News team in 2012. In addition to contributing to DSNews.com, he is also the online editor for DS News’ sister publication, MReport, which focuses on mortgage banking news. Related Articles Fannie Mae Freddie Mac Ginnie Mae mortgage servicing rights MountainView Servicing Group 2015-02-10 Tory Barringercenter_img Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago About Author: Tory Barringer February 10, 2015 1,347 Views Home / Daily Dose / Agency MSR Portfolio With $736 Million in UPB Up For Bidding A sizable new portfolio of agency mortgage servicing rights (MSR) has come to market with days left to go before bidding ends.The newest offering is a Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac, and Ginnie Mae MSR portfolio with $736 million of unpaid principal balance, according to an announcement from residential MSR and valuation advisory services provider MountainView Servicing Group, which is acting as adviser on the sale.Quality features of the bulk portfolio include 99 percent fixed-rate and 100 percent first-lien product, MountainView said in its announcement. The offering’s weighted average original FICO score is 762, the weighted average original loan-to-value ratio is 66 percent, and the weighted average interest rate is 3.94 percent.Most of the portfolio—89 percent of the packaged loans—is concentrated in California. The portfolio’s average loan size is $332,159.The portfolio is being offered with full representations and warranties from the seller, which is seeking a sale date no later than March 31. Bids are due February 12.This will be the second MSR rights sale of 2015 for which Denver-based MountainView Servicing Group has acted as adviser; in January, the firm advised on the sale of a Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac MSR portfolio with $4.2 billion in aggregate UPB. A spokesperson for MountainView said the company received five bids for that portfolio.Based on the annual number of sales, MountainView usually ranks first or second in the nation, according to the company’s announcement. During 2014, MountainView advised on 44 MSR portfolio sales involving a total of $43.5 billion of UPB. Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Sign up for DS News Daily Share Save Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Subscribelast_img read more


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Water Detective.

first_img A Timeline of WaterProtection Legislation Walk along the banks of the Savannah River. Fish the Chattahoochee. Swim in the Flint. Chances are you’ll see a sign warning of the potential risk due to pollution. Pollution threatens the quality of water and the health of people all over the state. But often, it’s not easy to determine exactly where that pollution is coming from.Feces in water typically comes from leaking septic tanks, agricultural runoff or animal droppings. If water contains feces, it could also contain disease-producing bacteria or viruses that can exist in the feces. These diseases include typhoid fever and hepatitis A.The maximum amount of pollution a body of water can have without violating state water-quality standards is called the Total Maximum Daily Load. Fecal pollution is a major contributor to TMDLs for Georgia watersheds.Most fecal pollution comes from nonpoint sources. So far, there has been no proven way to know where or from what animal it came. And if you can’t locate the problem, you can’t fix it.Water Detective “This is cutting-edge science,” said UGA CAES water quality coordinator Bill Segars. “The possibilities for using (this) method to identify nonpoint pollution sources could revolutionize water management around the world. This ribotyping data collection is a sound, scientifically based tool.”Other states are also using ribotyping to better understand pollution, said Alan Hallum, chief of the water protection branch of the Georgia Environmental Protection Division. But Georgia could lead the way.If there is a public health problem in a watershed, Hallum said, this test could better target what needs to be done in the watershed to correct the problem as quickly and as economically as possible.”I would like to have, from a state regulatory standpoint, a way to know we’re not spending money unnecessarily,” Hallum said. “This (test) allows the stakeholders in a watershed to do a best-management approach to fixing a problem.” But new research may help regulatory agencies pinpoint sources of fecal pollution and clean up one of Georgia’s most valuable resources.Peter Hartel is an associate professor of crop and soil science in the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. For the past two years, he’s been an environmental detective.Hartel uses a type of DNA fingerprinting that can tell what animal caused the fecal pollution of a specific watershed.Using a process called ribotyping, Hartel can make a DNA fingerprint, a series of distinct bands, of the Escherichia coli. This bacterium is found in all warm-blooded animal feces.A few years ago, scientists believed E. coli was the same in all animals. But it’s not. Different animals have different types.”Dog E. coli is found only in dogs. Human E. coli is found only in humans. The same with cows and poultry,” Hartel said. “We’re not sure why that is right now. But we know they’re different.”After you have a library of the distinct E. coli fingerprints of various animals, the rest, in theory, is easy, Hartel said.You can monitor and take samples of a watershed, isolate the different E. coli found in the water and compare that to the library of animal samples. That will tell you what animal feces are in the water, Hartel said.Building the LibraryWhen Hartel began his research, there was little information on ribotyping to identify pollution sources in water. He’s changing that.So far, his E. coli fingerprint library has samples from several Georgia animals, including beef cattle, swine, poultry and Canada geese. But he needs more.”There has to be an established library to compare and identify samples against,” Hartel said. “The more extensive the source library, the greater the likelihood of obtaining matches.”center_img Peter Hartel, UGA CAES researcher, works to build a DNA library that will identify points of pollution in Georgia watersheds. Photo:Robert Newcomblast_img read more


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Okemo receives governor’s workplace safety award

first_imgOkemo Mountain Resort is this year’s recipient of the Vermont Governor’s Award for Outstanding Workplace Safety in the Service Sector. This is the sixth year of the Workplace Safety Award that recognizes Vermont employers for outstanding achievement in workplace safety and health.“Workplace safety is crucial for the health and well-being of our workforce and for the vitality and productivity of our businesses,” Governor Douglas said. “With changes in technology and business practices, employers are constantly challenged to keep their workplace safe. We are pleased to recognize employers who are committed to safety.”Okemo’s management staff works hard to increase safety awareness and decrease workplace accidents by building a strong and sustainable safety culture.  The resort’s philosophy on workplace safety begins with its first corporate Value – Safety.“A safe work environment is healthy and critical for our staff, and we believe it contributes to a healthy environment for our guests,” says Okemo Vice President of Human Resources Crystal Stokarski. “We can also see direct results of our workplace safety awareness translating into employees’ personal safety off the job.  That is a true measure of the effectiveness of culture.”Safety has been a value at Okemo since the1980s.  Resort operators Tim and Diane Mueller have embraced the importance of safety and made it part of their company culture.  Okemo’s impressive safety statistics are the direct result of every employee’s contributions and actions.  It is common to hear staff say, “Safety First!” as they go about their daily work at Okemo.More information about Okemo Mountain Resort may be obtained by calling (802) 228-1600 or by visiting www.okemo.com(link is external), ###last_img read more


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Improving Regional Security through Information Operations

first_imgBy Geraldine Cook/Diálogo April 11, 2018 For the fifth time since 2013, representatives from the Caribbean came together to foster regional collaboration, strengthen relationships, and share Information Operations (IO) tactics, techniques, and procedures to counter common threats affecting the region and support coordinated hurricane-relief operations. Military and security representatives from the Bahamas, Bermuda, Canada, France, Great Britain, Jamaica, Haiti, Netherlands, and Turks and Caicos gathered at the 5th Caribbean Region Information Operations Council (CRIOC) in Kingston, Jamaica, from March 26-29, 2018. CRIOC was hosted by the Jamaican Defence Force and sponsored by the IO divisions of U.S. Northern Command (NORTHCOM) and the U.S. Southern Command (SOUTHCOM). “CRIOC is a unique organization. We have NORTHCOM, SOUTHCOM, the British, and the Canadians, among other nations, working with our Caribbean partners,” said Dr. Benjamin P. Gochman, chief of engagements at NORTHCOM’s IO division. “It’s two geographic combatant commands working together with other countries, achieving success by fostering collaboration and not only looking at common threats to the region, but also to see how we can work collectively to confront them”. “CRIOC is an example of the effectiveness of NORTHCOM and SOUTHCOM collaborating together,” added Dr. Gochman. “We started CRIOC with Bermuda, Bahamas, and Turks and Caicos. In order to grow the organization, we partnered with SOUTHCOM. Jamaica, Haiti, and Trinidad & Tobago also joined. Now we are asking Barbados to join in.” During three days of discussion, participants discussed their hurricane-response capabilities and lessons learned from hurricanes Harvey, Irma, and Maria in 2017. They worked in groups to create a partner nation threat matrix, in which international organized crime, narcotrafficking, illegal weapons, gangs, and natural disasters were identified. They also presented ideas on how partner nations use information-related capabilities to counter their common challenges. The ability to counter common threats is a predominant regional concern. “The British, the French, the Canadians, and the United States are in Jamaica to express that our partners are serious about using information to help mitigate our shared common threats,” said Jamaica Defence Force Major Basil Jarret, civil-military cooperation and media affairs officer. “Through collaboration, discussion, and sharing information and ideas, we can come together with stronger, resilient solutions to the problems we face.” Strengthening IO capabilities CRIOC nations are shaping their IO capabilities. They analyzed their strengths and limitations and shared best practices for their own benefit as well as for that of the region. “IO can help mitigate common threats, as information is a valuable weapon. It’s not in Jamaica’s best interest to keep its knowledge and information to itself, but by sharing and exchanging this information, it opens us up to other and better ways of doing things. It’s a win-win for us,” said Maj. Jarret. “There are no longer any unique challenges, all our challenges are shared. What happens in Jamaica has a ripple effect in Haiti and in the United States, so the best way to treat it is to have all the affected countries sit down and share information and resources to create effective strategies to deal with threats.” Participants recognize the importance of IO. “It’s very important that we understand the basics of IO,” said Royal Bahamas Defence Force Lieutenant Commander Carlon Bethell, staff operations officer. “We can communicate our capabilities to our partners and also understand our partners’ capabilities, so we can work better together because we all are trying to achieve the same common goal, security for our region.” “IO help us [so] we don’t have to fight. We don’t have to use aggressive sources or manpower for that matter,” said Lt. Commander Bethell. “We make information work for us in many ways as we shape thoughts and ideas by showing other countries the good things we are doing, but also let our adversaries understand we have the means to deal with all the problems they create for us.” CRIOC partners recognize the importance of supporting each other. “The ability of CRIOC is to link people together. It’s the networks that are pretty important,” said British Armed Forces Colonel Paul L. Fish, British liaison officer at NORTHCOM. “IO gives everyone the ability to understand that we are working in the same environment. We all have different skillsets and abilities that we all can bring in and share amongst ourselves to mitigate threats to our environment.” “CRIOC meetings are important as we have face-to-face discussions and improve our networks,” said French Armed Forces in the West Indies Commander Mikaël Péron, chief of the Joint Operations Center. “It’s imperative we exchange information and improve cooperation for the next hurricane season because we all know, it will happen again.” CRIOC hopes to expand its membership to different branches of government, non-governmental organizations, and other entities. The goal is to gain the citizens’ trust and willingness to work together in defeating criminal activities. “We are in this together. We are all here as equal partners, and we must be able to share information and support each other in times of need,” Col. Fish told assistants at the closing ceremony. “Collaboration is key.”last_img read more


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4 ways social media can help financial marketers celebrate community

first_img continue reading » While nearly all companies know they need a social media presence, many banks and credit unions have not embraced social media enthusiastically. Consider, as a benchmark, that Twitter launched in mid-2006, over a decade ago. Yet, on average, community financial institutions have been active on social media for just under three years, according to research by Kasasa.Many have — reluctantly — set up social profiles because they don’t want to appear to lag behind their competitors or because consumers expect to find them on social channels. Yet many of these same institutions don’t feel they are leveraging social media channels effectively, nor are they sure about the ROI of social, period.When they become at all active, many banks and credit unions merely use social media to push promotions, which tends to result in very little consumer engagement. That’s because social media is all about connection.When used effectively, social media channels offer banks and credit unions opportunities to foster, strengthen, and celebrate the communities at the heart of their business. An intentional, dedicated, and evolving social strategy has the potential to powerfully engage consumers and differentiate an institutions’ brand. 3SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more


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Man Found Dead in Elmont

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A 57-year-old man was found dead in Elmont on Thursday morning, Nassau County police said.Fifth Precinct officers responded to an alleyway between Huntley and Wellington roads, where the man was found lying dead on the grass shortly after 8 a.m., police said.Homicide Squad detectives are continuing the investigation but do not suspect foul play.The Nassau County Medical Examiner’s office will perform an autopsy to determine his cause of death. He was identified as Patrick Rogers, who has no known address.last_img


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Be grateful for the blessings of the U.S.

first_imgWe raised five children, for 30 consecutive years, in the Schenectady school district. I have always been a strong advocate of the district and the educational opportunities that are available — if you choose to take advantage of them.The picture of the football teams in the Sept. 30 Gazette was great. It seems the coaches and players handled the situation nicely. They are to be commended for their maturity and resolve.That picture and the many flags I see flying (seems like there’s a lot these days) remind me that we live in a God-blessed country. We are not perfect, we are very diverse and we will never all agree on the same things.However, when was the last time you read or heard about people literally or figuratively dying to get into any other country in the world? This should speak to us that despite our differences, we should be thankful for the bounty and blessings of this country. We should continue to lend a helping hand here and around the world.Susan HoverSchenectadyMore from The Daily Gazette:Schenectady department heads: Budget cutbacks would further stress already-stretched departmentsEDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationSchenectady NAACP calls for school layoff freeze, reinstatement of positionsSchenectady police reform sessions pivot to onlineSchenectady High School senior class leaders look to salvage sense of normalcy Categories: Letters to the Editor, Opinionlast_img read more


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Sumner County Court Docket: June 6, 2014 report

first_imgby Tracy McCue, Sumner Newscow — The following are a list of criminal court complaints recently filed by the Sumner County Attorney’s office.These are formal charges introduced into the Sumner County District Court system. The suspects listed in the complaint have not been tried by a judge or jury. All citizens are innocent until proven guilty in a court of law. ••••• Travis Moore, born in 1987, of Wichita was charged with disorderly conduct, a Class C misdemeanor; interference with law enforcement, a Class A misdemeanor; possession of marijuana, a Class A misdemeanor; and possession of drug paraphernalia, a Class A misdemeanor.Moore is accused of going to a nearby campsite of two individuals at the Drury Sam and angrily calling them names and kicking over a trash can. When the police were called he allegedly physically resisted being handcuffed. Law enforcement then allegedly discovered a baggy of marijuana hidden in a beer coozie.•••••Charles Schulz, born in 1958, of Wellington was charged with possession of methamphetamine with intent to distribute less than one gram, a level 4 drug felony; possession of drug paraphernalia, a level 5 drug felony; and possession of drug paraphernalia, a Class A misdemeanor.Schulz is accused of distributing meth in a quantity at least 1 gram but less than 3.5 grams, when he had about .08 grams of meth in his house in four different small bags. He also allegedly had a digital scale, a felony; and a glass smoking pipe, a Class A misdemeanor.••••• Kody Bacon, born in 1996; of Caldwell; and Taryn McHaley, born in 1996, of Hutchinson was charged with possession and consumption of alcohol by minor, a Class C misdemeanor.The two are accused of consuming and possessing vodka in their vehicle after being stopped by a sheriff deputy at 11:42 p.m. May 2 on Drury Road.••••• Bobby Joe Kent, Jr., born in 1979, of Caldwell was charged with battery, a Class B misdemeanor; and disorderly conduct, a Class C misdemeanor.During an argument on May 26, Kent is accused of punching someone in the stomach and using words that would alarm or disturb others.Kent pled guilty to battery on May 29. The disorderly conduct charge was dismissed. He was ordered to serve 90 days in jail and fined $100 with one year probation. He was released to see community service officer.•••••Travis Jay Pauly of Conway Springs was charged with disorderly conduct, a Class C misdemeanor; and littering, a Class C misdemeanor.Pauly is accused of yelling, screaming and cursing at a sheriff deputy after being caught urinating on a public street on the corner of 5th and Spring Street in Conway Springs and did so without the direction of public law enforcement of doing so.Pauly pled guilty to count two. He paid $100 plus court cost and served 30 day in jail suspended with payment.•••••Denelious Williams, born in 1986, of Wichita was charged with possession of marijuana with intent to sell, a level 3 drug felony; possession of drug paraphernalia, a level 5 drug felony; and no drug tax stamp, a level 10 felony.Williams is accused of selling, delivering or distributing marijuana at least 3.5 grams, but less than 100 grams. He also allegedly had a black digital scale and chrome metal grinder, a felony; and not having affixed the official stamp or other indicia as evidence the tax has been paid.•••••Dakota Allen Bellew, born in 1995, of Mulvane was charged with minor in possession on May 24.•••••Jonah Hirschfeld, born in 1995, of Derby was charged with minor in possession on May 24.••••• Stephen Dechenne, born in 1986, of Wellington was charged with possession of methamphetamine with intent to sell, a level 3 drug felony; possession of drug paraphernalia, a level 5 drug felony; no drug tax stamp, a level 10 felony; and possession of marijuana, Class A misdemeanor.Dechenne is accused of distributing more than 3.5 grams but less than 100 grams of meth; having a digital scale, having no drug stamp affixed to indicate tax has been paid, and possessing marijuana.last_img read more


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Grays Harbor Raceway Returns With A Full Lineup On September 14th

first_imgFacebook0Tweet0Pin0 Photo Courtesy of Jim MarshallAfter a week off Grays Harbor Raceway will get back to racing this Saturday September 14th.  The night will feature a full lineup of all five of GHR’s staple classes.  Those classes include the 360 Sprints, Shipwreck Beads IMCA Modifieds, USAC Ford Focus Midgets, Cut Rate Auto Parts Street Stocks, and Hornets.Tickets for Saturday will be Adults $13.00, Senior (62+)/Juniors (13-18)/Military $10.00, Youths (6-12) $5.00, Youths (5 and Under) FREE, Family Pass (Two Adults and Up To Four Youths) $30.00, and Premium Seating $20.00. Pit gates open at 2:30, front gates, 4:30, and racing starting around 6:30.It seems like it has been quite some time since the 360 Sprint were last in action.  After five events completed Reece Goetz continues to sit atop the winner’s list with two feature victories.  Currently he is the only driver to have won more than once while Henry Van Dam, J.J. Hickle, and Evan Margeson have a single triumph apiece.In Shipwreck Beads IMCA Modified action there is a three way tie for most victories.  Joe German, Craig Moore, and Zack Simpson each have won twice this year at Grays Harbor Raceway.  Joining them on the win chart for 2013 is Scott Miller, Jeff Foster, Alan Muenchow, Josh Muller, Jeremy Shank, and Jesse Williamson who have all won once.Chase Goetz continues to dominate the USAC Ford Focus Midget ranks as he seeks his first career GHR championship.  Goetz has visited victory lane a total of seven times while Jared Peterson has won twice and is the only driver to have beaten Goetz so far this year.You could also say the Cut Rate Auto Parts Street Stocks is a realm of pure domination as well.  Jason Tole has won eight times this year including the Cut Rate Auto Parts Iron Man 100.  Cory Sweatman, Austin Kerrigan, and Jack Parshall are the only other drivers to have beat Tole and each of them has done so on one occasion.  A tight point battle is underway with not many races left.  Cory Sweatman has a narrow three point lead over Jason Tole headed into Saturday night.Last but not least the Hornets are putting on a good championship battle.  Defending champ Chad Norton has a slim five point advantage over Willie Wright coming into this weekend.  Chad North and Jeff Daniel have each won three main events while Brian Norton has two triumphs to his credit.  Willie Wright is the only driver to have won in the division once in 2013.The Grays Harbor Raceway is known for its high speeds and side by side racing as well as its large track size. Hosting racing action from April to October regular classes include 360 Sprints, IMCA Modifieds, USAC Ford Focus Midgets, Street Stocks, Hornets, and for the first time the Northwest Extreme Winged Sprint Car Series. Special events include visits by the World of Outlaw Sprint Car Series and American Sprint Car Series-Northwest Region. You can keep up on all the latest activity at www.graysharborraceway.com for the most-recent news and stories.Additional InformationTrack: Grays Harbor RacewayLocation: 32 Elma McCleary Road, Elma, WA, 98541Track Contact: (360)-699-RACEWebsite: www.graysharborraceway.comSponsors: Budweiser, Bully Dog Performance, Cut Rate Auto Parts, Harbor Pacific Distributing, Hoosier Racing Tires, Lucky Eagle Casino and Hotel, The Contingency Connection, Lucas Oil Products, Our Community Credit Union, Pepsi, Shipwreck Beads, Whitney’s Auto Group, Elma Chamber of Commerce, Quinault Beach Resort and Casino, Grays Harbor County Fairgrounds, Adamas Reality, Olympic Eagle Distributing, Midnight Cruisers Rod Fest, PNE Corporation, Push Rods, Q-Mart, Midnight Cruisers, Fosses Hot Rods & Cool Cars, Harrington Financial, I-5 Quarter ¼ Midget Club, Jacknut Apparel, 104.7 KDUX FM, KIX 95.3 FM, RockAuto.com By Ben Deatherage for Grays Harbor Racewaylast_img read more