南京桑拿

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Keeping graves in good condition

first_imgBUSINESS NAME: Tombstone Tender BUSINESS ADDRESS: 1330 Clybourn Ave., Burbank PHONE: (818) 567-2926 E-MAIL: [email protected] WHY DID YOU START THIS BUSINESS? I saw the need for better care of our loved ones’ final resting spots. While attending a funeral, I saw an elderly woman fall as she was trying to clean her son’s marker. WHERE DID YOU GET THE IDEA? I noticed the lack of care the cemeteries provide. The grass and weeds were overgrown on some of the sites I saw while attending a friend’s funeral. HOW LONG WAS IT FROM CONCEPT TO OPENING? approximately two months WHAT DID YOU DO DURING THAT TIME? I stayed employed and started speaking to friends that have lost loved ones, offering my services. Most were happy to hear the idea. WHAT WERE YOUR STARTUP COSTS AND HOW DID YOU FINANCE THE BUSINESS? Very little. Cleaning supplies, towels, clippers, permits and local licenses and advertising cost about $3,000 from personal savings. WHO DID YOU RELY ON FOR ADVICE? Since there’s nobody else that provides this service, I couldn’t ask for advice, but friends helped steering me in the right direction. WHAT HADN’T YOU CONSIDERED BEFORE OPENING? Dealing with the grief of others. Sometimes it’s very hard. WHAT IS YOUR EXPECTED REVENUE THIS YEAR? $25,000 WHAT GOALS DO YOU HAVE FOR THE COMPANY? Right now, Tombstone Tender is only licensed for the San Fernando and Santa Clarita valleys. I would like to expand throughout Southern California. To be considered for a small business profile, you should have fewer than 10 employees and be locally based. For a free profile questionnaire, call (818) 713-3699.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREThe top 10 theme park moments of 2019 OWNER: Evan Johnson ESTABLISHED: 2000 NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES: two DESCRIBE YOUR BUSINESS: I care for and clean grave sites, markers and tombstones as a bimonthly service. IS THIS YOUR FIRST BUSINESS? yes last_img read more



College Footballs Bloated Bowl Season In 3 Charts

It’s a refrain almost as common as “Merry Christmas” this time of year: There are too many bowl games. While hardcore college football fans don’t mind watching, say, the Miami Beach Bowl on a Monday afternoon a full 10 days before the traditional bowlfest of New Year’s Day (guilty!), there’s also the sense that the bloated bowl season has taken away much of the meaning that used to be associated with playing in college football’s postseason.How much expansion has there been? This season will see a record 39 bowl games played, from the Popeyes Bahamas Bowl to the College Football Playoff National Championship. Compare that to 1968, when there were 11 bowls, or even 1984, when there were 18 — a total that would remain more or less static for more than a decade. But in the late 1990s (perhaps not coincidentally, when the Bowl Championship Series began), the bowl field began expanding rapidly, reaching 20 games in 1997, 25 in 2000 and 32 in 2006.In the chart below you can see the proliferation of the bowl field since 1982, the year cable television money and the departure of the Ivy League from Division I-A ushered in college football’s truly modern era:Some of the bloat is associated with an increase in the number of Division I-A (now known as the Football Bowl Subdivision, or FBS) football teams, to 128 this season from 113 in 1982. (A chunk of these new additions have come in just the past few seasons, as part of what FiveThirtyEight contributor David Goldenberg calls a “recent trend of universities starting football programs from scratch with the plan to get to Division I as soon as possible, and reap the PR and financial benefits that come with a major football program.”)But the growth of the FBS only explains a small portion of the bowl explosion. Even as a percentage of all FBS schools, almost twice as many teams will go bowling this season as did in 1996:Economically, there are pros and cons to the inflated bowl field. And these games do matter football-wise, especially to a certain subset of mid-major programs looking for exposure any way they can find it. But, as a natural byproduct of expansion, the caliber of teams in bowls has plummeted over the past three decades.Using an Elo-like estimated version of ESPN’s Football Power Index (FPI) pre-bowl ratings, here is the progression of the average, worst, and 25th-percentile teams in the bowl field for each season since 1982:The average rating for bowl-bound teams is barely lower now than it was in 1982, and the fact that it crested in 1996 — right before the bowl boom — suggests that there were enough good teams to support some type of expansion in the late 1990s. (Why this change took place is up for debate, though it could point to the origins of today’s ongoing trend of reduced parity between college football’s haves and have-nots.)However, the trend lines describing the dregs of the bowl field (the minimum and 25th-percentile ratings) show how much the bar for bowl entry has been lowered since that time. Bad teams occasionally made their way into bowls before 1997, but that’s now commonplace, particularly since the number of bowl entrants has grown by 39 percent since 2005.Monday’s Miami Beach Bowl thriller, between Memphis and Brigham Young, showed that less prestigious bowl games can still provide excitement for fans that bother to tune in. But it’s also fair to question whether we really need to see FPI No. 95 South Alabama and No. 97 Bowling Green (both considered to be in excess of 8 points per game worse than an average FBS team) face off in the Raycom Media Camellia Bowl — as happened on Saturday. Like so much in college football, the bowls are an as yet incomplete experiment in where to find a happy medium between tradition, money-making and the role of academic institutions in the world of high-profile sports. read more


Villanova Is Basically Starting From Scratch

2012-13Louisville31–6–Sweet 16 2014-15Duke425.5– 2011-12Kentucky736.3– SeasonChampionNumberWin Share 2010-11Connecticut513.4– 2017-18Villanova726.1– 2006-07Florida1033.7– 2008-09North Carolina20–17–NIT Back-to-back has become a pipe dreamHow men’s NCAA champions have fared the following season in college basketball’s one-and-done era 2011-12Kentucky21–12–NIT 2015-16Villanova32–4–2nd Round 2017-18Villanova2–0? 2005-06Florida35–5–Champion 2008-09North Carolina926.6– 2005-06Florida21.5– The NCAA Tournament’s First Four was known as the First Round until the 2015 tournament.Source: Sports-Reference.com SeasonChampionWinsLossesPostseason Source: Sports-reference.com 2013-14Connecticut20–15–NIT Villanova fans might choose to view things in a more optimistic way, instead thinking themselves as fortunate that they only lost four players, especially seeing the Wildcats of Kentucky lose an unimaginable six players after their championship in 2012 and then stumbling into the NIT a year later. Nova’s relatively tiny rotation last year — Villanova ranked 302nd in total bench usage, according to KenPom — could be a blessing in disguise as the likes of Eric Paschall and Phil Booth are still available to make the leap to the top of the college ranks and potentially beyond.Still, Villanova fans thinking of a repeat might want to curb the enthusiasm.Any team not named Duke, Kentucky or Kansas — whose recruiting prowess means a revolving door of NBA-bound super freshmen — has struggled to be relevant again immediately. If you look past these three blue bloods, Louisville is the only reigning champion to reach the Sweet 16 the year following championship in the last dozen years. It’s why the 2010 North Carolina Tar Heels couldn’t even make the NCAA Tournament after winning the whole thing a year earlier. It’s why last year’s Tar Heels were swept aside in the second round of the tournament by Texas A&M. 2010-11Connecticut20–14–2nd Round The Villanova Wildcats produced one of the most dominant seasons in NCAA history last year, going 36-4, including a complete dissection of a strong Michigan team to win the championship game. The Wildcats scorched teams on offense, ranking No. 1 in the country in offensive efficiency and effective field goal percentage, according to college basketball stats guru Ken Pomeroy. This helped them beat the Wolverines by 17 points.But the team that is defending that title — currently ranked eighth heading into Wednesday’s rematch with Michigan — is hardly recognizable eight months later, as four of coach Jay Wright’s stalwarts from a season ago are now in the NBA.The departure of Jalen Brunson and Mikal Bridges — a pair of juniors left over from the 2015-16 national title-winning team — has left a crater in Wright’s lineup. Along with the exits of Donte DiVincenzo and Omari Spellman, the outgoing quartet combined for a whopping 26.1 win shares last season1Win shares represent the number of estimated wins that a player produces for their team.It’s typical for reigning national champions to lose a large chunk of their talent the following season, especially in the one-and-done era. And while the Wildcats may not have lost the most win shares of past champions, the immediate exodus of talent will have huge consequences for their prospects to repeat as champions this season. This is perhaps a long way of saying winning back-to-back titles, or even coming close, has become very difficult in college basketball — and for good reason. The Florida Gators, in 2006 and 2007, and the Duke Blue Devils, in 1991 and 1992, are the only programs in the past 45 years to repeat as NCAA men’s basketball champions, after John Wooden’s UCLA Bruins capped off seven consecutive titles. Back then, Wooden had the luxury of coaching future NBA Hall of Famers Kareem Abdul-Jabbar2Then Lew Alcindor and Bill Walton for three seasons, something that is largely unheard of in today’s game.3Ironically, those two weren’t allowed to play their freshmen years because of a bygone rule, skipping what likely would be the only year they would play at UCLA today. Likewise, Mike Krzyzewski was able to develop chemistry with college stars like Christian Laettner, Grant Hill, and Bobby Hurley — all of whom stayed a full four years.And when it comes to the one-and-done era, the Gators are an anomaly themselves, as Donovan managed to persuade the likes of Joakim Noah, Al Horford and Corey Brewer to remain in Gainesville for their junior years before winning another title and then moving to lengthy careers in the NBA.For most champions, winning a national title usually means saying goodbye to their best talent — the nation’s top freshman are forced to use college as a stopgap for a year before jumping to the NBA, and upperclassmen often ride their team’s success to test the NBA’s waters. For his part, Wright did well to keep Brunson and Bridges in Philadelphia for another two years after winning their first title, which built a bridge to that second championship.But the team that cut down the nets last year has been gutted, particularly on the offensive side. Among the top four players of each champion since 2006, when the one-and-done began, Villanova’s departed quartet leave the greatest offensive hole for a reigning champion, a hole that might be too great to overcome. 2007-08Kansas27–8–Sweet 16 2016-17North Carolina26–11–2nd Round Departing players Season after championship … 2015-16Villanova511.4– 2016-17North Carolina721.8– 2013-14Connecticut719.8– 2012-13Louisville412.3– 2009-10Duke32–5–Sweet 16 2014-15Duke25–11–Sweet 16 Villanova’s departures have left a sizable holeTotal win share of players who left NCAA championship teams the season after their championship, since the beginning of college basketball’s one-and-done era 2006-07Florida24–12–NIT 2007-08Kansas935.3– 2009-10Duke620.7– Joining senior Paschall, who’s being touted as a first-round pick in the 2019 NBA Draft, and redshirt senior Booth, who netted 23 in his season debut last week, is the 12th best recruiting class, according to ESPN. Five-star recruit Jahvon Quinerly is considered one of the best freshman point guards in the nation, and four-star forwards Cole Swider and Brendan Slater both also have a place on the ESPN 100. Whenever this is enough for Wright’s team to make waves again in March is a question for the season ahead. However, with currently the fifth-best ranked recruiting class for next year, Wildcats fans may have another title-winning team in the not-too-distant future, maybe just not in the immediate one.CORRECTION (Nov. 14, 2018, 3:30 p.m.): An earlier version of this article incorrectly said the Florida Gators were the only team in 45 years to repeat as national champions in men’s college basketball. Duke also did, winning back-to-back titles in 1991 and 1992. read more


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Bucks comfortable with Bauserman as backup

Bauserman entered into the pros before playing at OSU, not for football, but as a minor league baseball player for the Pittsburgh Pirates.  It’s been three years since the backup quarterback walked on for the Buckeyes, and he still feels content about switching sports. “I miss the game,” Bauserman said. “But I certainly don’t miss the business.” Before he ever played at the professional or collegiate level, Bauserman was making waves in both Virginia and Florida, where he played high school ball. He made all-state for both football and baseball, and was verbally committed to OSU before choosing baseball as his destination after high school. Since Bauserman left the minor leagues and returned to his college of choice, he has moved from zero playing time to third string and finally to his current position as backup quarterback to Terrelle Pryor.  His improvement is something that quarterback coach Nick Siciliano has certainly taken note of. “He’s been trying to get better consistently,” Siciliano said. “It always gets better when you’ve played two sports and you’ve been doing it so long; things get clearer for you. It’s just a case of him getting better and better at his craft.” In the past three years, Bauserman has also noticed a change in his game.  Unlike other players at Ohio State, Joe Bauserman didn’t head into the college football scene right after high school. Instead, he skipped a step. “I’ve gotten better at the whole running thing,” Bauserman said. “Now I know if you get four yards, you get four yards. You don’t try running around for 15 yards wasting time.” “My overall consistency is better as well,” he said. “I’ve been making the right reads, taking what I can get. It’s the little things.” Despite not having the starting job, Bauserman continues to battle against the other quarterbacks during practice, trying to prove himself in every aspect of his game. “I feel strongly about the way I perform in practice nine times out of 10,” he said. “I just jump in and take it as it comes. I’m always coming in competing and trying to beat the next guy.” As a backup, Bauserman usually doesn’t see time until the fourth quarter of a game that has already been decided. For him, taking over for Pryor at the end of games is bittersweet. “It’s a good feeling, getting in there, but it’s hard,” Bauserman said. “You’ve been standing there on your feet for two hours, and then you have to go get warmed up.” Some players might get restless spending their time as a backup, but Bauserman is just trying to make the most of his experience at OSU both on and off the field. “It’s just another year under my belt. Any time you can get more experience, it helps you out,” he said. “Everybody’s just trying to get out of college, but I’m just trying to sit back and enjoy the time I’ve got left.” read more


Atacama Desert people found to have evolved greater tolerance of arsenic

first_imgA large sample of native arsenic. Credit: Aram Dulyan/Public Domain This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Native people living in a part of the Atacama Desert in Chile (in a place known as the Quebrada Camarones, where it is drier than any other non-polar spot on the planet) are descended from settlers that moved into the area approximately 7,000 years ago. Those early settlers faced serious health problems due to very high concentrations of arsenic in the only water available. The researchers with this new effort suggest that many such settlers likely perished before they could produce offspring, leaving those that were more physically suited to dealing with the toxic metalloid to keep the population going. To find out how the modern people there are able to drink water that would seriously harm other people, the researchers collected blood from 150 of the local residents and subjected the samples to genetic testing. In particular, the researchers looked for variants of an enzyme called AS3MT—prior research has shown that people with such variants are better able to tolerate arsenic. The team reports that approximately 68 percent of the people they tested had such a variant. AS3MT breaks arsenic down into two compounds: monomethylarsonic acid and dimethylarsinic acid. Those with the stronger gene variant produce more of the latter.The researchers note that their results show that AS3MT variants are only part of the answer; 32 percent of those tested did not have the variant, which suggests there is some other factor at play. The next step, they suggest will be to sequence the whole chromosomal region around the variant that has been found to see if there are others that might be providing some sort of unknown resistance. Citation: Atacama Desert people found to have evolved greater tolerance of arsenic (2017, February 27) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2017-02-atacama-people-evolved-greater-tolerance.html Study identifies first-ever human population adaptation to toxic chemical, arsenic Journal information: American Journal of Physical Anthropologylast_img read more