419推优

No Image

Highly-touted Robert Bolick says ‘hateful messages’ from bashers fuel his fire

first_imgRobert Bolick. Photo by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netMANILA, Philippines—Robert Bolick doesn’t concern himself with the negative opinions of others, but what he does though is use those hateful comments and channel it into his workouts.The former San Beda star and three-time NCAA champion, is busy readying himself for the upcoming PBA Draft and he’s using the ill-will on social media to fuel his workouts.ADVERTISEMENT No.13 lucky for Orlando Bloom View comments Japeth Aguilar embraces role, gets rewarded with Finals MVP plum “I’m reading a lot of articles and there are a lot of people who are angry at me and they don’t know that I’m actually really happy to read those comments,” said Bolick in Filipino during the PBA Draft Combine Wednesday at Gatorade Hoops Center.“The best is when people are sending hateful messages because I feel that there are still things that I have to work on. Another thing I do is read those comments before I train and I just can feel the satisfaction when I’m fatigued because I felt that I let out a lot of steam.”FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup titleSPORTSJapeth Aguilar wins 1st PBA Finals MVP award for GinebraSPORTSGolden State Warriors sign Lee to multiyear contract, bring back ChrissBolick, who stands at 6-foot-1, is poised to become a top three pick like NCAA rival CJ Perez, who played for Lyceum, and Bobby Ray Parks Jr. who has a wealth of experience after playing in the ABL and the NBA Summer League.Nevertheless, the former Red Lion is relishing the position he’s in knowing that the pressure of becoming a potential top three pick makes him one of the most coveted talents in the Draft. MOST READ LATEST STORIES After winning title, time for LA Tenorio to give back to Batangas folk Potential top pick CJ Perez draws inspiration from first born ahead of PBA Draft Will you be the first P16 Billion Powerball jackpot winner from the Philippines?center_img SEA Games 2019: No surprises as Gilas Pilipinas cruises to basketball gold PLAY LIST 06:27SEA Games 2019: No surprises as Gilas Pilipinas cruises to basketball gold00:50Trending Articles00:412 buses bound for SEA Games opening collide in Bulacan02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award Lights inside SMX hall flicker as Duterte rants vs Ayala, Pangilinan anew Lights inside SMX hall flicker as Duterte rants vs Ayala, Pangilinan anew Gretchen Barretto’s daughter Dominique graduates magna cum laude from California college ‘Mia’: Rom-com with a cause a career-boosting showcase for Coleen Garcia Nadine Lustre’s phone stolen in Brazil Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. “Of course, I’m happy and at the same time it’s challenging because everyone of these draftees are talented and every one of them wants to show their skills,” said Bolick. “This is the best thing about basketball because you’re all competing and everything’s a challenge.”Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Nextlast_img read more


No Image

Talk is cheap

first_img Unique talent Now Mayor Pothole wants to become head schoolmaster. He also wants to stick it to us on sanitation fees. So it appears that he is an academician, economist, budget expert and political scientist. Wow, what a talented guy. – Bill Rice Winnetka Quelling tensions Re “Mayor tries to quell tensions on neighborhood councils” (Tipoff column, April 10): All 15 council members must change the charter defining stakeholders. Greg Nelson’s reasoning allowing employees to be stakeholders is flawed. Union members join, pay dues and expect their officers to speak for them. Business employees are told by their employers who to vote for. There is no reason for employees to be stakeholders. The internal disputes keeping residents from getting involved reared their ugly heads during our recent elections. Business interests hijacked the election by giving employees time off, a list of preferred candidates and rides to the polls. Residents must get involved or face the consequences. – Marilyn White-Sedel Studio City Built-in tax growth Re “Mayor backs trash fee” (April 13): The city and county leaders seem to forget that not only does the tax revenue increase with the sale from real estate sales in the form of property tax but they also have built-in increases in form of sales tax on gasoline. The county collects 8.25 percent sales tax on each gallon of gas sold. There are million of gallons sold daily in L.A. County. As the price of gas goes up, so does the tax income. Why is there a need for additional trash fees? What is happening to this huge daily increase in sales tax revenue? – W. Fred Beck West Hills You don’t get it It’s very refreshing to see that about 99 percent of the letters being written are denouncing the mayor’s proposed trash fee increase. Hey, mayor, can you tell that the homeowners are sick and tired of getting screwed with rate increases? It doesn’t make any difference who is the mayor, or the makeup of the clowns on the City Council, it’s always stick it to homeowners to pay for what we should be getting already if we had competent people running this city. Keep this up and I would bet my last dollar you will follow the bungler you replaced as a one-term wonder. Of course, that’s assuming you or Roy Romer or Ron Deaton don’t get it first. – George Timko West Hills Negative integrity It appears that our mayor suffers from a paucity of integrity. I was there when he promised, if elected, that he would make sure that Gita, Ruby and Billy – the elephants at the L.A. Zoo – would be sent to a sanctuary and that the exhibit would be closed. He made that promise predicated on all the professional research presented to him by the humane community, which clearly made the case that elephants particularly suffer badly in any zoo atmosphere. I cannot imagine a council agreeing to spend so many millions to erect a monument to inhumanity for the momentary whim of a child, rather then spend that money on a comprehensive disaster program, which the city is still bereft of. – Michael Bell Encino Iraq deaths Re “April’s U.S. death count at 47 in Iraq” (April 17): Every year, more than 42,000 people die in traffic accidents in the U.S. Instead, the Daily News prints big headlines for 47 deaths in Iraq. In the three years we’ve been in Iraq, we have lost about 2,500 military personnel, many of these to illnesses, drownings, and, yes, traffic accidents. During the same three years, more than 12,000 people have died in traffic accidents in California alone. The Daily News should report the high number of deaths due to traffic accidents and guns in the U.S. every year. Maybe someone will get off their butt to try to stop the carnage right here in the U.S. – Earl J. Kangas Santa Clarita Outrageous prices With oil prices going through the roof, you would think our government would have a plan for alternative energy. But they don’t and we know why. The energy companies do not want an alternative source; those sources that would provide the people clean, efficient energy does not lead to profits. So we will still see the need for outrageous prices at the pump and in our homes. – Paul Straughn North Hollywood Defending Defense From all that I hear about Donald Rumsfeld from his supporters – and there are many – he is doing a fine job as secretary of defense. The complaining retired generals could have had their say when they were on active duty. The consensus is that Rumsfeld goes to great lengths to listen to diverse opinions before he makes a decision. My opinion is that the complaining retired generals had their “ox gored” when Rumsfeld reorganized the Army to be a lean and fast-moving fighting machine and now that they are retired, they are complaining. There are many more generals, and admirals as well, who support Rumsfeld as he accomplishes his duties as secretary of defense. I think that history will show that Rumsfeld has been one of the best secretaries ever. – Richard Kinsman Chatsworth Tax cartoon Re “View from the Valley” (April 18): Not quite. Taxes paid to the state of California are addressed to the Franchise Tax Board. Perhaps the caption should have read “We may as well be sending this to Mexico.” – Mary L. Harrington Granada Hills160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREOregon Ducks football players get stuck on Disney ride during Rose Bowl event State of the City? A fabulous speech by Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa, but he failed to tell Angelenos the state of the city. Frankly, he should have told us that he is not going to spend the $39 million for zoo elephants, but instead hire 2,000 policemen by summer and provide accommodations for the homeless, gangs and criminals with that money. It wouldn’t be fabulous, but it would be incredible. – Ray Holm Woodland Hills Our mayor’s first State of the City address regarding education reform was logical and much needed. However, his plans for the city, which promise a lot, may be very hard to accomplish unless he actually takes action. His statement that he planned to be “fiscally conservative with future spending” is a textbook example of political-speak. I would like to see him make one very strong move right now, that would put some substance behind his statement – stop the idiotic idea of spending $39 million on a new enclosure for the city’s three elephants. If our mayor cannot stop this wasteful spending, how will he ever be able to eliminate the city’s $295 million budget deficit? – Bob Bergstrom Woodland Hills last_img read more


No Image

Billy Beane, David Forst and Bob Melvin reflect on A’s early postseason exit

first_imgOAKLAND – The A’s home clubhouse was a mess, but sparse. Not long ago a calm baseball haven, a handful of players returned their summer digs post-Wild Card loss to pack up their memories and gear.“Next year, we battle for the division.” Yusmeiro Petit said as he prepared to depart for the offseason, club option on his contract now hanging in the balance. “I don’t want to play in any more Wild Card games.”The A’s will instead watch (or ignore and disconnect) the 107-win Houston Astros – their …last_img


No Image

Arrow Worms Miss the Mark in Darwin’s Tree

first_imgNature this week1 claims that “The origins of the arrow worms have long been obscure, but molecular studies are finally bringing the true evolutionary position of these beautiful marine predators into sharper focus.” (Emphasis added in all quotes.)  Arrow worms, or Chaetognatha, are “strikingly beautiful marine animals.” writes Maximilian J. Telford.  “Their transparent, slender bodies appear under the microscope like darting shards of glass.”  Despite their visual transparency, their place in the evolutionary “tree of life” has been cloudy: “In the 160 years since Darwin described them as remarkable for ‘the obscurity of their affinities’, arrow worms have been placed by different authors in a myriad of positions in the animal kingdom.”    The confusion has centered on whether they are protostomes (first mouth) or the more advanced deuterostomes (second mouth), because while arrow worms seem to exhibit deuterostomy in their developmental stages, the genetics don’t allow them to be fitted in with deuterostomes.  New phylogenetic studies of mitochondrial DNA have led some molecular evolutionists to place them into an unexpected position in the tree: members of an ancestral group that preceded the protostome-deuterostome split.  Could it be that protostomes descended from a deuterostome-like creature?  Evolutionarily, that seems backwards:Ignoring the possibility of convergent evolution, arrow worms and deuterostomes must have inherited their deuterostomy and other embryological similarities from a common ancestor (Fig. 2).  The new positioning of the arrow worms means that this common ancestor also gave rise to the protostomes.  This gives us an important insight into the early evolution of the protostomes, because it implies that they must have evolved from a creature that had deuterostome-like aspects of embryogenesis.  This result also leaves us with a problem of nomenclature, given that some of the protostomes are, embryologically speaking, deuterostomes….So why are the arrow worms turning out to be so hard to place within the animal kingdom?  The short answer seems to be that the arrow-worm genes studied so far have been subject to more rapid evolutionary change than those of other species.  The result is that, on an evolutionary tree, arrow worms form a long branch, and such long-branch species are notoriously problematic.  Unfortunately, the simplest solution to the long-branch problem – finding a species of arrow worm with a more normal rate of evolution – seems impossible, because all of the 100 or so living species appear to suffer from the same problem.  The unavoidable conclusion is that yet more genetic data need to be gathered in the expectation that the picture will continue to become clearer.  1Maximilian J. Telford, “Evolution: Affinity for arrow worms,” Nature 431, 254 – 256 (16 September 2004); doi:10.1038/431254b.This article illustrates many of the persistent sins of the Darwin Party when faced with uncooperative data.Stretch the rates of evolution to fit the data to the preconceived belief.Change the nomenclature as needed.Invent terms like convergent evolution to whitewash weaknesses in the story.Assume complexity arose even farther back in time, and say it just emerged somehow.Conjure up imaginative ancestors for which there is no fossil record.Speak of evolution in matter-of-fact, eyewitness news terms.Spin each new damaging piece of evidence positively: say it provides new insight into evolution.Use the phrase must have as glue to hold the story together.Claim that future evidence will make the picture clearer (apparently 160 years was not enough).Assume evolution no matter what the evidence says.  Allow no negotiation about the “fact” of evolution.Reread the article above with this list in mind, and decide with your own eyes, guilty or not guilty?(Visited 36 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more


No Image

Human Cloning Is Back

first_imgIf you thought work on human cloning and embryonic stem cell research went out of style with the discovery of induced pluripotent stem cells, watch out.  The pro-cloning people, who never lost their lust for toying with human embryos, are back.Writing for Science Magazine, Gretchen Vogel titled an article, “Human Stem Cells From Cloning, Finally.”  She seems delighted that researchers may be able to treat humans like farm animals:This time it looks like it’s for real: Researchers have made personalized human embryonic stem (ES) cells with a method similar to how Dolly the sheep was cloned—though with an added jolt of caffeine.The success, which produced stem cells carrying DNA belonging to a baby with an inherited disorder, comes 9 years after South Korean researchers claimed in a famously faked paper that they had achieved a similar feat. After their story unraveled, a handful of researchers continued trying, but human eggs, or oocytes, responded poorly to the techniques that have worked in sheep, mice, cows, pigs, and other animals.Now, thanks to years of work in monkey cells, a group led by Shoukhrat Mitalipov of the Oregon National Primate Research Center in Beaverton reports a recipe that works for human cells.Of course, there are those people troubled by the ethics of such research:While welcomed by many researchers, who envision creating personalized stem cells for therapies or research, the achievement is also likely to stir up old ethical debates about human SCNT [somatic cell nuclear transfer], including whether it should be regulated to prevent attempts at reproductive human cloning. In the short term, that shouldn’t be a worry, Mitalipov says.Who’s worried?  After all, the scientists don’t really want to clone human beings for a Star Wars army — at least not in the short term.  They just want to get their hands on those precious embryonic stem cells (ES), and this “success” opens the door for them.  Even so, “the team had surprisingly good success generating embryos,” Vogel said.But this begs the question: who needs ES cells, when induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS) are just as good without the ethical problems?This high efficiency could mean that SCNT is not as impractical for creating personalized human stem cells as many observers had expected. But it faces stiff competition from the current method of making genetically matched pluripotent cells, called induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. By adding extra copies of several genes to skin or other cells, scientists can reprogram them to behave like ES cells. That technique is much easier than SCNT, and it doesn’t require a supply of human oocytes. (The oocytes used in Mitalipov’s experiments were donated by healthy volunteers for research purposes; donors were paid $5000 for their time and trouble, the local rate paid to egg donors for fertility treatments.)Some researchers have found evidence, however, that there may be subtle but potentially significant differences between the genes expressed in iPS cells and ES cells derived from embryos. The chance to compare SCNT-derived human ES cells with iPS counterparts is one of the most important aspects of the new advance, Daley says. “There may be advantages to SCNT-ES cells, but this must be rigorously proven,” he says. In practice, he says, making iPS cells “remains considerably easier.“So just on the supposition that there might be a difference, some researchers are willing to destroy human embryos to find out.  Does that sound ethical?  She quoted a researcher who thinks both methods are “useful” — the language of pragmatism, not ethics.  Vogel had no further ethical qualms.To the editors at New Scientist, it’s “back to the future” all over again.A few years ago, therapeutic cloning looked like the future of medicine. It promised to realise the dream of repairing damaged tissues and organs using a patient’s own cells. But it also had a dark side: producing its supply of stem cells required the creation of human embryos which were later destroyed.What did Nature say about this?  David Cyranoski wrote in Nature this week wearing ethics on his sleeve from the first paragraph:It was hailed some 15 years ago as the great hope for a biomedical revolution: the use of cloning techniques to create perfectly matched tissues that would someday cure ailments ranging from diabetes to Parkinson’s disease. Since then, the approach has been enveloped in ethical debate, tainted by fraud and, in recent years, overshadowed by a competing technology. Most groups gave up long ago on the finicky core method — production of patient-specific embryonic stem cells (ESCs) from cloning. A quieter debate followed: do we still need ‘therapeutic’ cloning?Mitalipov’s experiment “is sure to rekindle that debate,” Cyranoski continued.   He described how Mitalipov used a “university advertising campaign” to attract women to donate eggs for his lab at the Health and Science University in Beaverton, Oregon.  (He first practiced on skin cells obtained from fetuses.)  His method sounds a little Frankensteinish, using electric jolts and caffeine to coax the stubborn skin cells to form stable stem cell lines.  It took longer to get human cells to work than monkey cells, he said, because much of the time was spent “navigating US regulations on embryo research.”Mitalipov is apparently most concerned about making his process more efficient, why? to attract funding:Such improvements might be necessary to convince people that SCNT research is still worthwhile. Egg donors for the experiment received US$3,000–7,000 in compensation. This is expensive and, according to some bioethicists, risks creating an organ trade that preys on the poor. Because the technique requires the destruction of embryos, funds from the US National Institutes of Health (NIH) cannot be used to make or study SCNT-derived cell lines, hampering further clinical research. (Mitalipov maintains a separate laboratory for NIH-funded research.)Another “sticking point” is public fear of human cloning.  Stem-cell opponents might “capitalize on” such fears, the article says.  Mitalipov is trying to convince opponents that creation of a human clone, like Dolly the sheep, is not possible (at least, at this time).But other stem-cell researchers are wondering why Mitalipov is wasting his time.  “Honestly, the most surprising thing [about this paper] is that somebody is still doing human [SCNT] in the era of iPS cells,” said a specialist in regenerative medicine.  Watchers will be waiting to see whether iPS and ES cells really differ in significant ways.New Scientist thinks the ethical battles will be muted during the Obama era:Will we now see a revival of the stem cell culture wars in the US? Probably, but they should be less polarised this time round. The Bush-era laws were relaxed by President Obama in 2009 to no great hullabaloo. The fact that the breakthrough work was done in Oregon may also help: home-grown success has a way of changing hearts and minds. What is clear is that we have entered a new phase in the long-running stem cell soap opera. Expect drama aplenty.But if this is a “soap opera,” it’s one where innocent human lives are at stake — and not only the lives of fertilized human embryos, but potential adult clones.  Live Science asked if this might lead to human cloning someday.  What worried reporter Rachael Rattner more, the pragmatics, or the principle of the thing?Although it would be unethical, experts say it is likely biologically possible to clone a human being. But even putting ethics aside, the sheer amount of resources needed to do it is a significant barrier.Rattner concentrated on practical problems with human cloning.  “It’s like sending your baby up in a rocket knowing there’s a 50-50 chance it’s going to blow up,” she quoted one researcher quipping.  “It’s grossly unethical.”  Practical problems, though, can be remedied with enough research.  If Rattner is willing to put ethics aside rhetorically, the day could come when unscrupulous, pragmatic researchers with government funding will put it aside for real.This story is very disturbing on the heels of the Kermit Gosnell trial.  Remember that abortion was sold in the 1970s in terms of concern for poor women who needed access to “reproductive health” needs.  The callous disregard for human life that resulted from that slippery slope has shocked the nation with revelations about Gosnell’s and other abortion mills described as “houses of horror” by investigators, who found abortion doctors twisting the heads off babies born alive, leaving them struggling for 20 minutes before severing their spinal cords with scissors, and telling mothers that the dead baby in the womb after chemical abortion is just “meat in a crockpot.”  Horrified nurses would find babies swimming in toilets and packed in bloody bags in refrigerators.  Do you think for a minute that “sanctity of human life” will fare any better among those who want free rein with human embryos?Speaking of abortion, Tanya Lewis wrote an interesting article for Live Science about ultrasound and how it has changed attitudes about abortion.  While ultrasound can backfire in cultures that want to use it for sex selection (aborting many female babies), for the most part it has given expectant mothers a view the abortionists never told them about: their baby is a living human being.Ultrasound has enjoyed an enthusiastic reception by pregnant women. In addition to revealing the baby’s health, the images themselves provide a keepsake. “Overwhelmingly, pregnant women expect to be scanned, and are moved and excited by seeing the fetus,” Nicolson said — especially if the baby moves. In fact, Nicolson said, some women report not feeling pregnant until they’ve seen the ultrasound image.Seeing a developing fetus has a humanizing effect, too. Donald, the physician who helped develop the technology, was a devout High Anglican, and knew the images carried moral significance for women contemplating having an abortion.Lewis cited anecdotal evidence that expectant mothers who see their baby with ultrasound are less likely to terminate their pregnancy.  Each moving baby that the mother rejoices to see on the ultrasound scanner was a single cell just a few months earlier.  The DNA for a full human is there in both cases; the difference between a moving baby in the womb and a fertilized cell is only a matter of time. (Visited 34 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more


No Image

14 live bombs recovered in Howrah

first_imgFourteen live bombs were on Thursday recovered from a shop in Howrah district, where a man was injured in an explosion on Wednesday, police said.Bomb squad personnel, during the search in the shop this morning, found the explosives, a police officer said.Komer Ali, the shop owner, who was injured in the explosion, has been admitted to Uluberia hospital with severe burn injuries, the officer said.Investigation into the incident is underway, he said, adding, police has not been able to interrogate Ali as he is in hospital.The explosion happened at the Teen Kapati Pool under the jurisdiction of Manikpur police station on Wednesday evening when Ali was closing the shop, the officer said.last_img